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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 465 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 382 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 375 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 344 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 303 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 283 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 274 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 267 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 253 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 250 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. B. Hood or search for J. B. Hood in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
s bravery. Indeed, the entire command at the burning bridge was efficient and brave. Our campaign in the barren turpentine peninsula was very uncomfortable. Food was scarce, and we all got smutted by lightwood fires. In fighting Terry's troops we encountered the first enemy armed with repeating rifles, one of his regiments (I believe the Tenth Connecticut) having Spencer seven-shooters. Soon after reaching Goldsboro we moved to Kinston, and General Bragg was reinforced by troops from Hood's army, now commanded by General D. H. Hill. The enemy came out from Newbern under General Cox, and Bragg advanced to meet him at or near Wise's Fork. Hoke's Division was put in motion in the night, Kirkland's Brigade this time leading, and by a long detour through woods and swamps, completely turned the enemy's right and advanced upon his rear. About noon on the 8th of March, 1865, Hoke formed his division in line for attack, Kirkland's Brigade on the right, and there was no sign that
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
ttingly impeached by superficial writers in search of a scapegoat for the untoward results of this fatal battle, and in justice to the troops engaged, it will hardly be regarded as out of place to cite some facts which have not ordinarily attracted attention. On the morning of the 3d of July the Federal line was complete, and occupied all the hills and ridges from Culp's Hill to Round Top mountain, without a break, while Kilpatricks cavalry enveloped the Confederate right, where McLaws and Hood, with about eight thousand men, were confronted by the Fifth and Sixth army corps occupying an impregnable position. These facts, it would seem, decided General Lee to form a column of attack on the point where Wright's Brigade had penetrated the Federal line on the previous evening. An interview with Lee. On the night of July 3d, General Imboden states that in response to a message he had an interview with General Lee, during which the latter, in a voice tremulous with emotion, said:
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Longstreet-Gettysburg controversy [from the Richmond (Va.) Dispatch, February 16, 1896.] (search)
letter from the Count of Paris, propounding a series of questions as to the causes of Lee's defeat at Gettysburg, and asking that I secure replies from leading Confederate officers, who were in position to know. I sent copies of this letter to prominent men in every corps, division, and arm of the service, with a personal letter requesting a reply. The result was a series of papers on Gettysburg from such men as Generals J. A. Early, A. L. Long, Fitz. Lee, E. B. Alexander, Cadmus Wilcox, J. B. Hood, H. Heth, L. McLaws, R. L. Walker, James H. Lane, and B. D. Fry, Colonels William H. Taylor, William Allen, J. B. Walton, J. R. Winston, and W. C. Oates, Major Scheibert, of the Prussian Engineer Corps, Captain R. H. McKim, and the Count of Paris. General Longstreet did not send me a paper, as I requested him to do, but published a second paper in the Philadelphia Times, in which he undertook to reply to his critics, who had handled his first article pretty roughly. It is clear that I wa