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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
a, L. W. Spratt; to Mississippi, M. L. Bonham; to Louisiana, J. L. Manning; to Arkansas, A. C. Spain; to Texas, J. B. Kershaw. Alabama.--To North Carolina, Isham W Garrett; to Mississippi, E. W. Pettus; to South Carolina, J. A. Elmore; to Maryland, A. F. Hopkins; to Virginia. Frank Gilmer; to Tennessee, L. Pope Walker; to Kentucky, Stephen F. Hale to Arkansas, John A. Winston. Georgia.--To Missouri, Luther J. Glenn; to Virginia, Henry L. Benning. Mississippi.--To South Carolina, C. E. Hooker; to Alabama, Joseph W. Matthews; to Georgia, William L. Harris; to Louisiana, Wirt Adams; to Texas, H. H. Miller; to Arkansas, Geo. R. Fall; to Florida, E. M. Yerger; to Tennessee, T. J. Wharton; to Kentucky, W. S. Featherstone; to North Carolina, Jacob Thompson; to Virginia, Fulton Anderson; to Maryland, A. H. Handy; to Delaware, Henry Dickinson; to Missouri,---Russell.--McPherson's Political History of the Great Rebellion, page 11. We have had glimpses of these Commissioners at several
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Longstreet's divisionYorktown and Williamsburg. (search)
cut off Johnston's retreat. The divisions of Hooker, Smith, Kearney, Couch and Casey, preceded by r guard. During the night the division of General Hooker, 9,000 strong, had arrived on the field, oaylight as his dispositions could be made, General Hooker commenced a vigorous attack. The Confedrch of the army. At half-past 7 o'clock General Hooker began operations by sending forward a batt and six pounders. The co-operation which General Hooker expected from Smith's division, and the ot which he extended his right flank, to envelop Hooker's left and relieve his front. These brigades fell upon Hooker's left flank, composed of Patterson's and a part of Taylor's brigades, and after a son's brigade with a portion of Grover's which Hooker withdrew from in front of Fort Magruder. Unabmmunition. It happened at this same time that Hooker's division was relieved by the arrival of Kearor numbers had at length regained a portion of Hooker's lost ground, when night put an end to the co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
elicacies of the season, sweet music enlivened the occasion, the committee in charge and the Maryland soldiers generally were all attention and courtesy to their guests, the speeches seemed to be heartily enjoyed, and the mingling together of old comrades a delightful recalling of the hallowed memories of the brave old days of ‘61-‘65. The regular toasts were as follows: 1. The Army and Navy of the Confederate States. This was responded to in an eloquent and effective speech by Hon. Charles E. Hooker, of Mississippi, whose empty sleeve gave touching testimony to the faithfulness with which he served as a private soldier in the Army of Northern Virginia. He was loudly applauded. 2. Our Cavalry. As General W. H. F. Lee rose to respond to this toast he was greeted with enthusiastic cheers, frequently repeated as he proceeded to make the speech of the occasion. After expressing his pleasure at meeting old comrades, General Lee said that it was quite probable that he was too par
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaigns of the civil war — ChancellorsvilleGettysburg. (search)
od, and he apportions the blame for its disaster there much more justly between Hooker, Howard, and Sedgwick than does Colonel Dodge, in his more elaborate and most et he knew Jackson to be moving all day across his front, and had been warned by Hooker to be on his guard. Again, though Sedgwick showed tardiness and lack of enterpdericksburg, General Doubleday sees so clearly the immensely greater blunder of Hooker in lying idle at Chancellorsville with (besides the troops that had been engagen front of 17,000 worn out men, while Sedgwick was being beaten, that he thinks Hooker must have been incapacitated for command by his wounds of the day before. He sn of those 60,000 Confederates who throttled the finest army on the planet, (as Hooker with pardonable pride termed it) on the south bank of the Rappahannock and hurlalry, after the return of May 31st was made Stahl's brigade of 6,100 men joined Hooker, but the Federal cavalry suffered severely in the fights and marches of June, a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The PeninsulaMcClellan's campaign of 1862, by Alexander S. Webb. (search)
rg (May 5) the Confederates found it necessary to check the advance of the Federals, which was pressing their rear. Longstreet and D. H. Hill were halted for this purpose. Longstreet accomplished the end in view handsomely by severely defeating Hooker's division, and inflicting some damage on Kearney's. D. H. Hill, on the Confederate left, did not manage so well, and in consequence Hancock was able there to inflict a severe repulse on Early's brigade. But, on the whole, General Johnston, withsult of a change of commanders in the midst of a battle was seen next day. No concerted, definite plan of operations guided the Confederates on June 1st. Severe but desultory fighting took place between Longstreet's lines and the fresh troops of Hooker's and Richardson's divisions without any decided result, while Smith, now in chief command of the Confederates remained quiet in front of Sumner, though Magruder's large division, which had been unengaged, was at hand. By midday all fighting had
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
all Jackson's battles have been taken in reverse. We found him first on the blood-stained field of Antietam — almost at the close of his career, instead of at the beginning. The world knows how he fought there. We found him at Kernstown fighting one to four--fighting, falling back, grimly giving way to fight again. We saw him strike the Federal armies right and left in the Valley, and fill Washington with white faces. We found him at Fredericksburg on Lee's right; at Chancellorsville in Hooker's rear; at Manassas behind Pope, on his flank, in his front. We have found him at Gaines's Mill. Fate waited for him before striking a last blow. It was the hammer in his grasp which shattered the Federal position. Without him Longstreet and Hill would have been pressed back, routed, annihilated. A Christian in faith — a child in his sympathies — a General who cared not for the world's admiration so much as for the comfort of any single man who followed him in his wonderful marches. <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
owned the hills and filled the earth-works, while the banks were lined with troops, and the pontoon boats were deposited on the brink of the river. Five bridges were to be constructed. Three opposite to the town, for the passage of Sumner's and Hooker's grand divisions, and two for Franklin's grand division, at points about two miles below. Meanwhile General Lee was by no means taken by surprise. It was reported in the army that a good Virginia lady, whose house was in the Federal lines, cam Ninth Corps on its left flank, extended to Deep Run, where it connected with Franklin's Grand Division, which crossed at the lower bridges, and formed behind the bluffs between the Bowling Green road and the river. The Third Corps, belonging to Hooker's Grand Division also crossed at the latter place, his other Corps, the Fifth, being held in reserve on the left bank until the 13th. The fog completely hid the Federal movements until nearly noon, and no fighting occurred, except a liberal shel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
urnside, who was looking on from the Phillips house, and receiving particulars from his balloonists and couriers, ordered Hooker to cross the river with the Fifth corps, which was still in reserve, and to carry that crest. Accordingly the dense colus, which had heretofore been mere spectators of the stirring scene, now poured down toward the pontoon bridges, while General Hooker in person hurried across to examine the position. On the Confederate side the Fifteenth South Carolina, from the cemnd commenced to fire took to their heels to regain the shelter of the Valley — and the plateau was again deserted. General Hooker seems to have been a witness to this attack, and was so discouraged by its result, that he galloped back across the r Marye's Hill had absorbed not only the whole of Sumner's force, except perhaps one division of the Ninth corps, but also Hooker's reserve, leaving no force available for operations on other portions of Sumner's front. Along the rest of Longstreet's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Two foreign opinions of the Confederate cause and people. (search)
lmination of the vulgarity, moral as well as formal, of the unworthiness and ignobleness that had so long dishonored more and more deeply the chair of Washington. Lincoln's uncleanness of language and thought would hardly have been tolerated in a Southern bar. Or, again, take the favorites of the North--the best known names in the camp and Cabinet — Sheridan and Hunter, whose ravages recall the devastation of the Palatinate, political rowdies like Banks and Butler, braggarts like Pope and Hooker, or even professional soldiers like Meade, Sigel, Sherman. These are the household words of the North, and any one Southern chief of the second rank — Ewell, Early, Fitzhugh Lee, Hardee, Polk, Hampton, Gilmer, Gordon — alone outweighs them all. Needless to remind you that among the twenty millions--mostly fools--was no man whom even party spirit dared liken to the stern, simple Virginia professor, the Cavalier-Puritan, whose brigade of recruits stood like a stone wall under the convergent f<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
Southern Historical Society for this special work, and it is with great pleasure that I present to you General Fitzhugh Lee, of Virginia. General Lee arose amid a burst of applause, which lasted for some moments, and as soon as he could be heard commenced the delivery of his lecture. After a full synopsis of the lecture, for which we have not space, the News and Courier thus concluded its appreciative notice: His summing up of the results of the campaign, and quiet humor over Hooker's famous general order, contained some very fine touches. His closing eulogy on Stonewall Jackson, was an eloquent tribute from a gallant and able soldier to one of the great military geniuses of all history. The lecture was, in a word, an able military criticism of a great campaign, a vivid description of interesting movements, and an eloquent tribute to the skill of our leaders, and the heroism of our men which emblazoned Chancellorsville on the tattered battle flag of the Army of Nort
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