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Slocum's left; Gen. McCall's position was to the left of the Long bridge road, in connection with Gen. Kearny's left; Gen. Hooker was on the left of Gen. McCall. Between twelve and one o'clock the enemy opened a fierce cannonade upon the divisionsttacked in large force, evidently the principal attack; that in less than an hour the division gave way, and adds: Gen. Hooker, being on his left, by moving to his right repulsed the rebels in the handsomest manner with great slaughter. Gen. Suin position on the highest point of the hill. Couch's division was placed on the right of Porter; next came Kearny and Hooker; next Sedgwick and Richardson; next Smith and Slocum; then the remainder of Keyes's corps, extending by a backward curve n A. M. the enemy commenced feeling along our whole left wing, with his artillery and skirmishers, as far to the right as Hooker's division. About two o'clock a column of the enemy was observed moving towards our right, within the skirt of woods i
not hear from them before to-morrow noon. Colburn has gone with them. . . . 7 A. M. Pretty sharp cannonading has been going on in my front this morning — Hooker's command at Malvern; they are still cracking away pretty sharply. Have not heard details, but will ride out in that direction. . . Aug. 5, Malvern Hill, 1 P. M. (to Gen. Marcy). . . . Hooker has been entirely successful in driving off the enemy; took about one hundred prisoners, killed and wounded several. The mass escaped under cover of a thick fog. Hooker's dispositions were admirable, and nothing but the fog prevented complete success. We have lost three killed and eleven wouHooker's dispositions were admirable, and nothing but the fog prevented complete success. We have lost three killed and eleven wounded, among the latter two officers. I shall retain the command here to-night. Keep all things ready to move out should we be attacked. I shall not return before dark, and may remain all night; will send in for my blankets and ambulance if I stay. I am now starting to look over the ground. I have sent a party to communicate w
on Petersburg, or even the abandonment of the Peninsula. Gen. Hooker, with his own division and Pleasonton's cavalry, was the on account of the incompetency of guides. On the 4th Gen. Hooker was reinforced by Gen. Sedgmick's division, and, having the time: Malvern Hill, Aug. 5, 1862, 1 P. M. Gen. Hooker at 5.30 this morning attacked a very considerable force ad, and I have taken steps. to prepare to meet them. Gen. Hooker's dispositions were admirable, and his officers and men n earnest protest against it. A few hours before this Gen. Hooker had informed me that his cavalry pickets reported large he above telegram from the general-in-chief, to withdraw Gen. Hooker, that there might be the least possible delay in conforming to Gen. Halleck's orders. I therefore sent to Gen. Hooker: . . . Under advices I have received from Washington, I th, were embarked on the 7th and 8th. Simultaneously with Gen. Hooker's operations upon Malvern I despatched a cavalry force u
fortifications and command them for the defence of Washington. I remarked . . . that I could not but feel that giving command to him was equivalent to giving Washington to the rebels. This and more I said. . . . The President said it distressed him exceedingly to find himself differing on such a point from the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Treasury; that he would gladly resign his place; but that he could not see who could do the work wanted as well as McClellan. I named Hooker, or Sumner, or Burnside, either of whom would do the work better. Mr. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, in his book, Lincoln and Seward, New York, 1874, page 194, says: At the stated cabinet meeting on Tuesday, the 2d of Sept, while the whole community was stirred up and in confusion, and affairs were growing beyond anything that had previously occurred, Stanton entered the council-room a few moments in advance of Mr. Lincoln, and said, with great excitement, he had just learned
y. The firing shows that Miles still holds out. Longstreet was to move to Boonsborough, and there halt with the reserve corps; D. H. Hill to form the rear-guard; Stuart's cavalry to bring up stragglers, etc. We have cleared out all the cavalry this side of the mountains and north of us. The last I heard from Pleasonton he occupied Middletown, after several sharp skirmishes. A division of Burnside's command started several hours ago to support him. The whole of Burnside's command, including Hooker's corps, march this evening and early to-morrow morning, followed by the corps of Sumner and Banks, and Sykes's division, upon Boonsborough to carry that position. Couch has been ordered to concentrate his division and join you as rapidly as possible. Without waiting for the whole of that division to join, you will move at daybreak in the morning by Jefferson and Burkittsville upon the road to Rohrersville. I have reliable information that the mountain-pass by this road is practicable for
own, except Rodman's division at Frederick. Hooker's corps on the Monocacy, two miles from Frederth were as follows: May 13th, 11.30 P. M. Hooker to march at daylight to Middletown. May 13th,30 P. M. Sykes to move at six A. M., after Hooker, on the Middletown and Hagerstown road. May 1ed that on the right afterwards taken up by Gen. Hooker. Gen. Wilcox was in the act of moving to ocwhole force as soon as he was informed that Gen. Hooker (who had just been directed to attack on the left of the main column, the right, under Gen. Hooker, was actively engaged. His corps left the Col., Asst. Adj.-Gen., and Aide-de-Camp. Maj.-Gen. Hooker. Meade's division left Catoctin creeky on the slope, but soon ceased by order of Gen. Hooker, and the position of our lines prevented anng to outflank him on his right, applied to Gen. Hooker for reinforcements. Gen. Duryea's brigade, to the rear of the pass. I sent the order to Hooker to move at once. (Burnside had nothing to do [3 more...]
onton, and the three corps under Gens. Sumner, Hooker, and Mansfield (the latter of whom had arrived by Gen. Burnside's corps. Before giving Gen. Hooker his orders to make the movement which will forces then disposable. About two P. M. Gen. Hooker, with his corps, consisting of Gens. Rickett. The firing lasted until after dark, when Gen. Hooker's corps rested on their arms on ground won was perhaps half-past 3 to four o'clock before Hooker could commence crossing and get fairly in motiund in front of his troops. Gen. Hartsuff, of Hooker's corps, was severely wounded while bravely prtion on the right, developed by the attacks of Hooker and Sumner, rendered it necessary at once to s so hotly contested before by Gens. Sumner and Hooker; Gen. Bartlett's brigade was ordered to form aroceeding to the right, I found that Sumner's, Hooker's, and Mansfield's corps had met with serious nded. The death of Mansfield, the mounding of Hooker, Richardson, and Sedgwick, were irreparable lo[11 more...]
, camp near Sharpsburg . . . We fought yesterday a terrible battle against the entire rebel army. The battle continued fourteen hours and was terrific; the fighting on both sides was superb. The general result was in our favor; that is to say, we gained a great deal of ground and held it. It was a success, but whether a decided victory depends upon what occurs to-day. I hope that God has given us a great success. It is all in His hands, and there I am content to leave it. The spectacle yesterday was the grandest I could conceive of; nothing could be more sublime. Those in whose judgment I rely tell me that I fought the battle splendidly and that it was a masterpiece of art. I am well-nigh tired out by anxiety and want of sleep. God has been good in sparing the lives of all my staff. Gens. Hooker, Sedgwick, Dana, Richardson, and Hartsuff, and several other general officers, wounded. Mansfield is dead, I fear, but am not certain. I just learn that he is not mortally wounded.
Sept. 20, 8 A. M., camp near Sharpsburg. . . . Yesterday the enemy completed his evacuation of Maryland, completely beaten. We got many prisoners, muskets, colors, cannon, etc. His loss in killed and wounded was very great; so was ours, unfortunately. Gen. Mansfield was killed (or rather died of his wounds). Gens. Sedgwick, Richardson, Dana, Brooks, Hooker, Weber, Rodman, and two others were wounded on Wednesday. Poor Henry Kingsbury died of his wounds the day after the battle. The battle lasted fourteen hours, and was, without doubt, the most severe ever fought on this continent; and few more desperate were ever fought anywhere. 9 A. M. . . . Am glad to say that I am much better to-day; for, to tell you the truth, I have been under the weather since the battle. The want of rest, and anxiety, brought on my old disease. The battle of Wednesday was a terrible one. I presume the loss will prove not less than 10,000 on each side. Our victory was complete, and the diso
The supply-trains were in the rear, and many of the troops had suffered from hunger. They required rest and refreshment. One division of Sumner's and all of Hooker's corps on the right had, after fighting most valiantly for several hours, been overpowered by numbers, driven back in great disorder, and much scattered, so that they were for the time somewhat demoralized. In Hooker's corps, according to the return made by Gen. Meade commanding, there were but 6,729 men present on the 18th; whereas on the morning of the 22d there were 13,093 men present for duty in the same corps, showing that previous to and during the battle 6,364 men were separatedficers, and 3,708 enlisted men had been wounded, besides 548 missing; making the aggregate loss of this splendid veteran corps, in this one battle, 5,209. In Gen. Hooker's corps the casualties of the same engagement amounted to 2,619. The entire army had been greatly exhausted by unavoidable overwork, fatiguing marches, hunge
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