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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Hancock and Howard in the first day's fight. (search)
e manner in which he handled his troops on the field. The reserves have never before during this war been thrown in at just the right moment. In many cases when points were just being carried by the enemy, a regiment or brigade appeared to stop his progress and hurl him back. Moreover, I have never seen a more hearty cooperation on the part of general officers as since General Meade took command. In a resolution dated January 28th, 1864, the thanks of Congress were tendered to General Joseph Hooker and his army for the movement covering Washington and Baltimore; and to Major-General George G. Meade, Major-General Oliver O. Howard, and the officers and soldiers of that army, for the skill and heroic valor which, at Gettysburg, repulsed, defeated, and drove back, broken and dispirited, beyond the Rappahannock, the veteran army of the Rebellion. On May 30th, 1866, the thanks of Congress were given to Major-General W. S. Hancock, for his gallant, meritorious, and conspicuous share
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.42 (search)
upon the ridge between Cemetery Hill and Little Round Top.--editors. Map 16. positions July 2d. About 2:30 P. M. time that I was called upon to meet deficiencies under such circumstances, and I was, therefore, prepared for this, having directed General Tyler, commanding the Artillery Reserve, whatever else he might leave behind, to bring up every round of ammunition in his trains, and I knew he would not fail me. Moreover, I had previously, on my own responsibility, and unknown to General Hooker, formed a special ammunition column attached to the Artillery Reserve, carrying twenty rounds per gun, over and above the authorized amount, for every gun in the army, in order to meet such emergencies. I was, therefore, able to assure General Meade that there would be enough ammunition for the battle, but none for idle cannonades, the besetting sin of some of our commanders. He was much relieved, and expressed his satisfaction. Now, had he had at this time any intention of withdrawin
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The cavalry battle near Gettysburg. (search)
the 28th of June, 1863, General Meade relieved General Hooker, who, since the 13th, had been moving northwardng up the rear of the Confederate army. This corps Hooker had desired to reenforce by the large garrison of Hashington, positively refused to permit. Thereupon Hooker ordered the Twelfth Corps back, and requested to beentrate his forces at Gettysburg. The wisdom of Hooker's policy in desiring to assail the rebel communicatght of the 28th, to the effect that the army of General Hooker had crossed the Potomac and was approaching the, was a severer threat to Lee than a persistence in Hooker's plan. The movement against the Confederate commu essentially the same result as that which followed Hooker's division of his forces at Chancellorsville. On tead of persisting in the division of the army which Hooker had initiated, was largely influenced by that intenng before learned of the crossing of the Potomac by Hooker, recalled his advanced divisions from Carlisle and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.89 (search)
nt of the campaign, and to lose it was virtually to lose all east Tennessee south of Knoxville. If Bragg knew at the time of the prospective help coming to him from the Army of Northern Virginia, it was of still more importance to hold the town, that he might be the more readily in communication with Longstreet on his arrival. Under similar circumstances General Lee detached Early's division to hold the heights of Fredericksburg, and neutralized Sedgwick's corps, while he marched to attack Hooker at Chancellorsville. Bragg, however, may have felt too weak to spare even one division from his command. Whatever may have been his motive, he completely abandoned the town by the 8th, and Crittenden took possession of it next day. My corps, Breckinridge's division of my corps had come up from Mississippi and was substituted for Stewart's, sent to Knoxville to join Buckner. D. H. H. consisting of Breckinridge's and Cleburne's divisions, had led in the withdrawal, and was halted at Lafa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 9.96 (search)
he east to his assistance under command of General Hooker. Marching orders were received on the 22d the advance reached Bridgeport, and on the 3d Hooker established headquarters at Stevenson, and Howridgeport, General Grant says [see p. 689]: Hooker had brought with him from the east a full supphave been the fact, but unfortunately was not. Hooker's command, when ordered west, had land transpon after most seriously felt on the Tennessee. Hooker's troops were supplied from the corral at Nash I quote from my Diary: Oct. 5, 1863.-General Hooker was over yesterday . . . and examined the 19th, under General Rosecrans's orders to General Hooker, I was charged with the work on this road.l Meigs arrived on their way to the front with Hooker and staff. I accompanied them as far as Jaspe000 pounds of forage, within five miles of General Hooker's men, who had half a breakfast ration lefmidnight I started an orderly to report to General Hooker the safe arrival of the rations. The orde
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 9.97 (search)
ttanooga, the following details were made: General Hooker, who was now at Bridgeport, was ordered towhich the troops had been so long deprived of. Hooker had brought with him from the east a full supp strength on Lookout Mountain was not equal to Hooker's Panoramic view of the Chattanooga region ongstreet's corps. When the battle commenced, Hooker ordered Howard up from Brown's Ferry. He had evacuation. Orders were accordingly given to Hooker to march by this route. But days before the bh the troops on Missionary Ridge. By marching Hooker to the north side of the river, thence up the ne across the valley and on Lookout Mountain. Hooker's order was changed accordingly. As explainedow hold the eastern slope and a point high up. Hooker reports two thousand prisoners taken, besides Sherman was directed to attack at daylight. Hooker was ordered to move at the same hour, and endedo so escaped. Many, however, were captured. Hooker's position during the night of the 25th was ne[29 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Sherman's attack at the tunnel. (search)
so protected behind rifle-pits, logs, and bowlders, that they could throw stones on the assaulting column and do almost as much harm with them as with bullets. More regiments were sent in to Corse, and the hand-to-hand assault was renewed till Corse himself was borne wounded from the field. Still his men fought on, retreating not a foot. Around to our left, General J. E. Smith's division was gradually getting possession of that part of the enemy's line, and far off across Lookout Valley, Hooker's men, in possession of the heights, were driving in the left flank of the rebel army. It was 2 o'clock when our division, my own regiment with it, was ordered to fix bayonets and join in the assault on the ridge. We had been concealed from the enemy all the forenoon by the edge of a wood; yet his constant shelling of this wood showed that he knew we were there. As the column came out upon the open ground, and in sight of the rebel batteries, their renewed and concentrated fire knocked
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Comments on General Grant's <placeName reg="Chattanooga, Hamilton, Tennessee" key="tgn,7017496" authname="tgn,7017496">Chattanooga</placeName>. (search)
lf, which was as to the relative time at which Hooker's column was to move from Bridgeport. That to could not join Sherman, it was turned over to Hooker, who was ordered, with his command thus strengkirmishing varied by some artillery practice. Hooker had carried Lookout Mountain after a fight whi the battle above the clouds. This victory of Hooker's compelled Bragg to withdraw his troops from ge. As the day wore on, and no news came from Hooker, Thomas grew anxious, but could give no order ion of Sherman and the threatening movement of Hooker. The battle was then ended and nothing leftomas looked toward following up the success of Hooker at Lookout Mountain by turning the left flank a bridge into Lookout Valley, or a movement by Hooker's command from Bridgeport, although 1 was his phed to Mr. Stanton that Rosecrans had ordered Hooker to concentrate his troops with a view to movincessary to throw a bridge after the arrival of Hooker's troops in that Valley. With Bragg's force, [4 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The army of the Cumberland at Chattanooga. (search)
At daylight on the morning of October 28th General Hooker crossed the river at Bridgeport with the Eone bright from before midnight till morning. Hooker's troops were sleeping soundly after their hary more of the enemy, were killed and wounded. Hooker thus gained Lookout Valley; the siege of Chattnt Secretary of War Dana, General Thomas, Generals Hooker, Granger, Howard, and other distinguisheds division and Grose's brigade were crossing. Hooker's command, now united in the enemy's field, wan. But all the enemy's works had been taken. Hooker had carried the mountain on the east side, haded the gallant boys in blue. At 2 o'clock Hooker reported to General Thomas and informed him thot definitely known even to General Grant; for Hooker was only ordered to make a demonstration, and,teau. The enemy was seen to be in flight, and Hooker's men were in pursuit! Then went up a mighty an's artillery crossed. At 1 o'clock, just as Hooker was rounding the front of Lookout Mountain, th[20 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Opposing forces in the Chattanooga campaign. November 23d-27th, 1863. (search)
Brigade loss: k, 14; w, 160; in, 1==175. Artillery, Capt. Cullen Bradley: Ill., Battery, Capt. Lyman Bridges; 6th Ohio, Lieut. Oliver H. P. Ayres; 20th Ohio, Capt. Edward Grosskopff; B, Pa., Lieut. Samuel M. McDowell. Eleventh Corps, Maj.-Gen. Joseph Hooker, commanding Eleventh and Twelfth Army Corps, had under his immediate command the First Division, Fourth Corps; the Second Division, Twelfth Corps; portions of the Fourteenth Corps, and the First Division, Fifteenth Corps. Co. K, 15th Ill. Cav., Capt. Samuel B. Sherer, served as escort to Gen. Hooker. Maj.-Gen. O. O. Howard. General Headquarters, Independent Co., 8th N. Y. Infantry, Capt. Anton Bruhn. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Adolph von Steinwehr. First Brigade, Col. Adolphus Buschbeck: 33d N. J., Col. George W. Mindil; 134th N. Y., Col. Allen H. Jackson; 154th N. Y., Col. Patrick H. Jones; 27th Pa., Maj. Peter A. McAloon (mn w), Capt. August Reidt; 73d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Joseph B. Taft (k), Capt. Daniel F. Kelly (c), L
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