Your search returned 6,352 results in 390 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 17: preliminaries of the great battle. (search)
posts his Corps Lee's lines advantageously placed Hooker's advance on the eve of battle should have been reseneral Cox, and assigned the First Corps, under General Hooker, for his right flank. General Burnside was retccess by his reserve. At two P. M. of the 16th, Hooker's First Corps crossed the Antietam at the bridge neft vacant by the change of Hood's brigades. General Hooker was joined, as he marched that afternoon, by hif pending affairs. It subsequently transpired that Hooker thought the afternoon's work ordered for his corps sions well on the flank of the attack to be made by Hooker. Hood with S. D. Lee's batteries received Hooker'sHooker's attack, and arrested its progress for the day. If Jackson could have been put into this fight, and also the brigades under J. G. Walker, Hooker's command could have been fought out, if not crushed, before the afternoon the Twelfth Corps and took position supporting General Hooker's command, with the divisions of Generals A. S.
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 18: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam. (search)
Bloodiest single day of the war comparison of casualties Hooker opens the fight against Jackson's centre many officers among the fhe thunderous crash of cannon-shots. The first impact came from Hooker's right division under Doubleday, led by the choice brigade under Getts's division, engaged in close connection along Lawton's front. Hooker supported his battle by his division under Meade, which called into's battery of four Napoleon guns came. As Jackson withdrew, General Hooker's corps retired to a point on the Hagerstown road about three-qeneral Doubleday established his thirty-gun battery. Jackson's and Hooker's men had fought to exhaustion, and the battle of the Twelfth Corpsnderson's, though longer engaged, did not lose so severely. General Hooker's aggregate of loss was 2590; General Mansfield's, 1746. ThGeneral Sumner testified,--On going upon the field I found that General Hooker's corps had been dispersed and routed. I passed him some dista
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 19: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam (continued). (search)
. A, D, F, and G, Capt. Royal T. Frank; 19th U. S. Inf., Co. G, Capt. Edmund L. Smith ; 19th U. S. Inf., Co. H, Capt. Henry S. Welton. Headquarters Guard, Maj. Granville O. Haller; 93d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Benjamin C. Butler. Quartermaster's Guard, 1st U. S. Cav., Cos. B, C, H, and I, Capt. Marcus A. Reno. First Army Corps, designation changed from Third Corps, Army of Virginia, to First Army Corps, by General orders, no. 129, Adjutant-General's office, September 12, 1862. (1) Major-General Joseph Hooker, wounded September 17. (2) Brigadier-General George G. Meade. escort, 2d N. Y. Cav., cos. A, B, I, and K, Capt. John E. Naylor. First Division, (1) Brig.-Gen. Rufus King, Relieved September 14. (2) Brig.-Gen. John P. Hatch, Wounded September 14. (3) Brig.-Gen. Abner Doubleday:--First Brigade, Col. Walter Phelps, Jr.; 22d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. John McKie, Jr.; 24th N. Y., Capt. John D. O'Brian ; 30th N. Y., Col. William M. Searing; 84th N. Y. (14th Militia), Maj. William H. de B
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 21: reorganization and rest for both armies. (search)
nder. The change was a good lift for the South, however; McClellan was growing, was likely to exhibit far greater powers than he had yet shown, and could not have given us opportunity to recover the morale lost at Sharpsburg, as did Burnside and Hooker. General Burnside, soon after assuming command, and while waiting at Warrenton, made a radical change in the organization of the army by consolidating the corps into three Grand divisions as follows: the right Grand division, General Sumner Commanding.-Second Army Corps, General D. W. Couch; Ninth Army Corps, General O. B. Wilcox. centre Grand division, General Joseph Hooker Commanding. --Third Army Corps, General George Stonemall; Fifth Army Corps, General Daniel Butterfield. left Grand division, General W. B. Franklin Commanding. --First Army Corps, General J. F. Reynolds; Sixth Army Corps, General W. F. Smith. cavalry division.--General Alfred Pleasonton. Artillery, siege, and field batteries, 370 guns, General Henry
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 22: battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
forces. McLaws's division of my corps was posted on the heights in rear of the city, one brigade in the sunken road in front of the Marye mansion, the others extending across the Telegraph road through the wood of Lee's Hill. As the other divisions of the corps came up they were posted, R. H. Anderson on Taylor's Hill; Ransom in reserve, near corps Headquarters; Pickett in the wood, in rear of McLaws's right; Hood at Hamilton's Crossing. The Federal Grand Divisions under Franklin and Hooker marched on the 18th of November, and on the 19th pitched their camps, the former at Stafford Court-House, and the latter at Hartwood, each about ten miles from Falmouth. A mile and a half above Fredericksburg the Rappahannock cuts through a range of hills, which courses on the north side in a southeasterly direction, nearly parallel, and close to its margin. This range (Stafford Heights) was occupied by the enemy for his batteries of position, one hundred and forty-seven siege guns and lon
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 23: battle of Fredericksburg (continued). (search)
but half-way up towards the goal his men stopped to load and open fire, which neither he nor his officers could prevent, so they were driven back. Then he made a like effort with his other brigade, under special orders from Generals Burnside and Hooker that the point must be carried before night,and the dew was then falling. (Just then our second big Parrott gun went into fragments, but without damage to the men.) The troops that had been driven back from previous attacks joined in trying to ith on their face. The losses at Fredericksburg were as follows: Vol. XXI. of the Official Records. Union Army. Organization.Killed.Wounded.Captured or Missing.Total. Right Grand Division (Sumner)52342816405,444 Centre Grand Division (Hooker)35225015023,355 Left Grand Division (Franklin)40127616253,787 Engineers849259 Artillery Reserve0808 Aggregate12849600176912,653 Confederate Army. CapturedOrganization.Killed.Wounded.Captured or Missing.Total. First Army Corps (Longst<
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 24: preparing for the spring of 1863. (search)
Burnside's abortive moves the mud march General Hooker supersedes Burnside the Confederates stred march, was followed by the assignment of General Hooker to command of the Army of the Potomac. ay of April the Army of the Potomac, under General Hooker, took up its march for the fords of the up to strengthen and improve his trenches, while Hooker was intrenching at Chancellorsville. He couldhis trenches, would have been stronger against Hooker than he was in December against Burnside, and have grown stronger every hour of delay, while Hooker would have grown weaker in morale and in confihe one hundred and thirteen thousand under General Hooker. By the time that the divisions of Pickett and Hood could have joined General Lee, General Hooker would have found that he must march to attaunity, and have been in condition to so follow Hooker as to have compelled his retirement to Washingme for concentration and opportunities against Hooker more effective than we experienced with Burnsi[2 more...]
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter25: invasion of Pennsylvania. (search)
Headquarters. The Third Corps, General A. P. Hill, was left in observation of the enemy at Fredericksburg. When General Hooker discovered the thinning of our camps in rear of Fredericksburg, he put a bridge across the Rappahannock at Deep Run, nst Hill, but holding the Second ready to go back to him should there be need. Hill made a similar demonstration against Hooker, threatening on the river below, though not so far as to cross it, which caused the Federals to draw their troops from thorps waited at the court-house to know if indications about Fredericksburg were such as to warrant the onward march. General Hooker, not convinced that General Lee had left him, ordered his cavalry under General Pleasonton, supported by two brigadesto file in between him and Washington. The reconnoissance and cavalry fight made against Stuart at Fleetwood gave General Hooker conclusive evidence of the march of the Army of Northern Virginia, and he drew off from Stafford Heights on the 13th,
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 26: Gettysburg-First day. (search)
ion in conformance with the revelation General Meade had succeeded Hooker in command five days before battle positions on the eve of the firals at night of the 27th, and approximate positions of others. General Hooker had crossed the Potomac on the 25th and 26th of June. On the 2cacy, and the Twelfth, towards Harper's Ferry. On the 26th, General Hooker thought to use the Twelfth Corps and the garrison of Harper's Feneral Halleck forbade the use of the troops of that post, when General Hooker asked to be relieved of the responsibility of command, and was succeeded by General Meade on the night of the 27th. If General Hooker had been granted the authority for which he applied, he would haven to ride and report the trouble. General Stuart was riding around Hooker's army, General Robertson was in Virginia, General Imboden at Hancod been engaged with two corps of the army formerly commanded by General Hooker, and that the remainder of that army, under General Meade, was
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 32: failure to follow success. (search)
heir heads. As this little practice went on, a despatch messenger came bursting through the brushwood, asking for General Longstreet, and reported the enemy marching from Bridgeport along the base of the mountain,--artillery and infantry. General Bragg denied the report, and rebuked the soldier for sensational alarms, but the soldier said, General, if you will ride to a point on the west side of the mountain I will show them to you. We rode and saw the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps under General Hooker, from the Army of the Potomac, marching quietly along the valley towards Brown's Ferry. The general was surprised. So was I. But my surprise was that he did not march along the mountain top, instead of the valley. It could have been occupied with as little loss as he afterwards had and less danger. He had marched by our line of cavalry without their knowing, and General Bragg had but a brigade of infantry to meet him if he had chosen to march down along the top of the mountain, and
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...