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's way. Where ‘Stonewall’ Jackson fell In this tangled nook Lee's right-hand man was shot through a terrible mistake of his own soldiers. It was the second of May, 1863. After his brilliant flank march, the evening attack on the rear of Hooker's army had just been driven home. About half-past 8, Jackson had ridden beyond his lines to reconnoiter for the final advance. A single rifle-shot rang out in the darkness. The outposts of the two armies were engaged. Jackson turned toward hihat fierce contested field when Chickamauga lay Beneath the wild tornado that swept her pride away; Her dimpling dales and circling hills dyed crimson with the flood That had its sources in the springs that throb with human blood. ‘Go say to General Hooker to reinforce his right!’ Said Thomas to his aide-de-camp, when wildly went the fight; In front the battle thundered, it roared both right and left, But like a rock ‘Pap’ Thomas stood upon the crested cleft. ‘Where will I find you, Ge
find an honored grave and rise to a higher bliss than this world gives. ‘Their searching message from those distant hours’ With a stained and crumpled picture Of a woman's aged face; Yet there seemed to leap a wild entreaty, Young and living—tender—from the face When they flashed the lantern on it, Gilding all the purple shade, And stooped to raise him softly,— ‘That's my mother, sir,’ he said. ‘Tell her’—but he wandered, slipping Into tangled words and cries,— Something about Mac and Hooker, Something dropping through the cries About the kitten by the fire, And mother's cranberry-pies; and there The words fell, and an utter Silence brooded in the air. Just as he was drifting from them, Out into the dark, alone (Poor old mother, waiting for your message, Waiting with the kitten, all alone!), Through the hush his voice broke,—‘Tell her— Thank you, Doctor—when you can,— Tell her that I kissed her picture, And wished I'd been a better man.’ Ah, I wonder i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address on the character of General R. E. Lee, delivered in Richmond on Wednesday, January 19th, 1876, the anniversary of General Lee's birth (search)
orthern Virginia which met and mastered army after army, baffled McClellan, and destroyed successively Pope, Burnside and Hooker; which twice invaded the enemy's country, and which, when at last against it was thrown all the resources of the United Sconclusions with many of that brilliant band, and prove himself the master of each in turn, of McClellan, of Burnside, of Hooker, of Pope, of Meade, of Grant, of whomsoever could be found to lead them by the millions he confronted. When the war of s and by which timidity forbade him to profit. Witness that crowning glory of his audacity, the change of front to attack Hooker, and that march around what Hooker called the best position in America, held by the best army on the planet. Witness hisHooker called the best position in America, held by the best army on the planet. Witness his invasion of Pennsylvania, a campaign whose only fault was the generous fault of over confidence in an army whose great deeds might, if anything, excuse it; an over confidence, as we ourselves know, felt by every man he led, and which made us reckles
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville--report of General R. E. Lee. (search)
Lee's, the whole under the immediate command of General Stuart. About the twenty-first small bodies of infantry appeared at Kelly's ford and the Rappahannock bridge, and almost at the same time a demonstration was made opposite Port Royal, where a party of infantry crossed the river about the twenty-third. These movements were evidently intended to conceal the designs of the enemy, but, taken in connection with the reports of scouts, indicated that the Federal army, now commanded by Major-General Hooker, was about to resume active operations. At half-past five o'clock A. M., the twenty-eight of April, the enemy crossed the Rappahannock in boats near Fredericksburg, and driving off the pickets on the river, proceeded to lay down a pontoon bridge a short distance below the mouth of Deep run. Later in the forenoon another bridge was constructed about a mile below the first. A considerable force crossed on these bridges during the day, and was massed out of view under the high banks o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative numbers at Gettysburg. (search)
the return for July 10th is this note: Brigade of regular batteries, aggregate 595, omitted in last report of June 30 (on account of loss of previous returns and absence of the officer who could replace them), included as gain in this report. Hooker in his testimony (page 162) says that, at Fairfax Courthouse, Stahl's cavalry, numbering 6,100 sabres, was added to his cavalry — which was about the 16th or 17th of June. As the cavalry for duty on the 31st of May numbered 10,192, the additiocrease of thirteen per cent. in the numbers reported for duty on the 30th of June, or stated to have been present for duty on the 28th, in so short a space of time. In order to succeed, he must first show that false returns were made out by both Hooker and Meade. The return for May 31st showed 10,192 present for duty in Pleasonton's cavalry, and there was added to it Stahl's cavalry of 6,100 sabres, making the whole about 16,300, and this the Comte reduces to 10,440 at the battle, thus dispo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual meeting of Southern Historical Society, October 28th and 29th, 1878. (search)
Day of Judgment would come before Richmond would pass into the possession of the enemy, and I felt sure that they would have important business elsewhere about that time. And a day of judgment did come first, too, or a day about as near like it as my imagination can compass. That this confidence was not without some warrant in 1865 what I have said about our defences will justify. There had been many bold attempts made to capture Richmond. Generals Scott, McDowell, McClellan, Burnside, Hooker, Pope and Grant had all tried it with immense forces at command, and all had failed. Rushing raids, led by Stoneman, Kilpatrick, Dahlgren and Sheridan, had been checked short of the objective point. There seemed to be no getting On to Richmond. General Grant had been fighting it out on that line longer than all summer. General Grant, according to Federal official reports, carefully collected and collated and published by your efficient Secretary, had started from the Rapidan in May, 18
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson — the story of his being an Astrologer refuted — an eye-witness describes how he was wounded. (search)
n books as well as in a more fleeting form, and no two of them agree as to the circumstances attending the wounding of General Jackson. A book entitled Keel and Saddle, and written by General Revere, who served in the Army of the Potomac under Hooker, appeared several years since, in which is contained a very remarkable story about General Jackson, in connection with the subject of astrology and his being wounded at Chancellorsville. In this book, General Revere, who seems to have belonged awas evident that his intention was to storm the enemy's works at Chancellorsville as soon as the lines were formed and before the enemy had recovered from the shock and confusion of the previous fighting, and to place the left of his army between Hooker and the river. While the orders were being issued, General Jackson sat on his horse just in front of the line, on the pike. From this point he sent me with an order to General Hill. I galloped back and met General Hill in about fifty yards, ri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of General J. E. B. Stuart before Chancellorsville. (search)
that General Lee received opportune intelligence of what was passing on his left. Neither the records nor events themselves justify this view of the case. General Stuart, usually so vigilant, seems on this occasion to have been surprised. General Hooker says that four hours after his three corps had crossed the Rappahannock the Southern cavalry were still picketing Richards' ford, and the writer knows that when, thirty-six hours after the passage, General Meade came within sight of Chancello, General Stuart had not yet interposed any body of horse between his advance and Fredericksburg. Nor is it possible that General Lee received timely information of the Federal operations. It is incredible that he would, by choice, have allowed Hooker to concentrate at Chancellorsville with the option, when there, of taking his line in reverse, or of moving upon his line of communications and forcing a battle upon unequal terms. Two brigades (Mahone's and Posey's) of Lee's army were stationed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), McClellan and Lee at Sharpsburg (Antietam).--a review of Mr. Curtis' article in the North American review. (search)
0 men, held McClelland's army in check all day. On the 15th, Stonewall Jackson, with 9,793 Confederates, captured over 11,000 Federals, more than 70 cannon, several thousand horses, and all of their small arms, colors and equipments! On the 15th, Lee took position at Sharpsburg, with 17,460 infantry and several thousand cavalry and artillery, while McClellan's army confronted him on the line of the Antietam. On the 16th, about 3 P. M., McClellan assaulted Lee with the three corps of Hooker, Mansfield and Sumner, which were so severely punished, that McClellan tells us that about the middle of the afternoon he went in person to the scene and found the aspect of affairs anything but promising ; in fact, they were driven from the field by Lee in utter confusion. On the 17th, the attack was renewed by McClellan with a fresh corps. During the day Stonewall Jackson came to Lee — his force was 9,793 infantry, which brought Lee's whole army up to 27,253 infantry, and less than 8,0
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Williamsburg and the charge of the Twenty-fourth Virginia of Early's brigade. (search)
e van retired. That evening McLaws was relieved, as already said, by R. H. Anderson, commanding the brigades of Anderson and Pryor. In the morning, after much skirmishing, without advantage to the enemy, he appeared on the right, in force under Hooker, attacking with spirit, but, though reinforced by Kearney, he was pressed back, driven and almost routed. Testimony before Congressional Committee on Conduct of War. Part I, pages 353-366. Here was fighting pretty much all day, but night foundursuit was fifteen miles in rear, and had remained below Yorktown Evidence of Governor Sprague and others before Congressional Committee on Conduct of War.--he took no part in what was going on around him; and though importuned for aid by both Hooker and Kearney, who were almost routed, he declined to part with a man; and when Hancock, finding the empty redoubt on the left, ventured into it, he actually commanded him to return. In fact, he seems to have forgotten that he was in pursuit of wh
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