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Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Index. (search)
al, 240. Grant, General, 56, 57, 265, 283, 292. Greeley, 152. Greene, W. T., 267. Gulliver, Rev. J. B., Reminiscences, 309. H. Halpine, Colonel, 63, 278 Hammond, Surgeon-General, 274, 275 Hanks, Dennis, 299. Harris, Hon., Ira, 175. Hay, John, 45, 149. Henderson, Rev. Mr., 320. Henry, Dr., (Oregon,) 302. Herndon, Hon., Wm. H.; analysis of Mr. Lincoln's character, 323. Higby, Hon., William, 148. Holland, Dr., 79, 191. Holmes, O. W., 58. Holt, Judge. 32, 33. Hooker, General, 233. Hospitals, 107. Hubbard, Hon. Mr., (Ct.,) 253. I. Independent, New York, 88, 230, 287. Ingenious Nonsense, 158. Inman, (Artist,) 69. J. Jackson, Stonewall, 234, 268. Johnson, Hon., Andrew, 102. Johnson, Oliver, 77. Jones, (Sculptor,) 34. K. Kelly, Hon., Wm., 92, 165, 294 King, Starr, 228. Knox, William, (Poet,) 60. L. Lincoln, Hon. G. B., of Brooklyn, 110, 113, 234. Lincoln, Mrs. 165, 293, 301. Lincoln, President, account of Emancipa
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 1 (search)
a landing at Brown's Ferry, completely surprising the guard at that point, and taking most of them prisoners; at seven o'clock Smith's force had been ferried across, and began to fortify a strong position; and at ten a bridge had been completed. Hooker's advance, coming up from Bridgeport, arrived the next afternoon, the 28th, at Brown's Ferry. The river was now open from Bridgeport to Kelley's Ferry, and the wagon road from that point to Chattanooga by way of Brown's Ferry, about eight miles ecovered from his surprise, he woke up to the importance of the achievement; Longstreet was despatched to retrieve, if possible, the lost ground. His troops reached Wauhatchie in the night of the 28th, and made an attack upon Geary's division of Hooker's forces. The fight raged for about three hours, but Geary succeeded in holding his ground against greatly superior numbers. During the fight Geary's teamsters had become scared, and had deserted their teams, and the mules, stampeded by the sou
t of the Eleventh and Twelfth corps, under General Hooker, from the Army of the Potomac. With this n Nashville and Stevenson, and given orders to Hooker to concentrate at Bridgeport such portions of was successfully accomplished by the moving of Hooker's command to Rankin's and Brown's ferries in cg troops from his left, which circumstance led Hooker to advance on the northerly face of Lookout Mofirst, with good glasses, we could plainly see Hooker's troops driving the Confederates up the face practically the fight had been already won by Hooker's men, the enemy only holding on with a rear-gThe officer soon returned with the report that Hooker was all right, that the cannonading was only aowned with the success anticipated. Meanwhile Hooker and Palmer were swinging across Chattanooga Va genius, for the manoeuvering of Sherman's and Hooker's commands created the opportunity for Thomas'cess of execution advantage was taken of it by Hooker in a well-planned and well-fought battle, but [1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville-report of Major-General Stuart. (search)
emy had crossed at Fredericksburg, and taken Marye's hill. An aide-de-camp of Gen. Sedgwick, captured by Col. Wickham's regiment on the right near Banks' ford, reported two corps under command of Sedgwick. The Commanding-General decided to hold Hooker, beaten as he was, in his works, with Jackson's corps, and detach enough of other forces to turn on Sedgwick. The success of this strategy enabled him again to concentrate to force Hooker's position; and arrangements were made for attack with thHooker's position; and arrangements were made for attack with this corps on the morning of the 6th (Wednesday); but before it was begun our skirmishers found the enemy's works abandoned, and, pressing forward to the river, captured many prisoners. The enemy had another work, two miles in rear of the other, which was also abandoned. This region of country is known as The Wilderness. Rapid pursuit in such a country is an impossibility, where the enemy takes care to leave his trains beyond the Rappahannock, and avails himself, as he does, of the appliances o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the defeat of Gen. Lee's Army at the battle of Gettysburg-opinions of leading Confederate soldiers. (search)
been, for it was elated with the victory over Hooker, and bouyant with the prospect of carrying thenearly, if not quite double its numbers, under Hooker. In this condition of things, it was very app take the aggressive. The first was to attack Hooker's army in position, and endeavor to destroy itopt one of the other alternatives. Of course, Hooker would not have undertaken another forward moveectly on Washington would have been idle, for Hooker would have moved back into the defences of thahe chose to do so. It was impossible to attack Hooker at Fredericksburg, when he was only 10 or 12 mctive on the Rappahannock. 2d. ---- thinks Hooker should have been defeated on the southside of der 70,000 in his entire department, to defeat Hooker so long as the latter remained in the. vicinitthe main column of the army, he found that General Hooker had interposed between him and General Lee00 under General French at Harper's Ferry. General Hooker, who was relieved but a few days before th[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg. (search)
oeuvre in Virginia inviting an attack, but in vain-at least he gave Hooker opportunities which were not availed of, and no disposition shown twhile, with 18 guns of my own batallion and Cabell's 18, I attacked Hooker's corps at the Peach Orchard. McLaws' division was, during this, i no time in doing so, and he was expected to give notice as soon as Hooker crossed the Potomac. As no report had been made it was believed that Hooker was still in Virginia, and, under this impression, orders were issued to move on Harrisburg. Ewell, with two of his divisions, Johnysburg pike. During the night of the 28th a scout reported that Hooker had crossed the Potomac and was moving north and towards South mounoutheast of Gettysburg, bivouacked the First and Eleventh corps of Hooker's army; and an infantry division of the Federal army camped at Fairinvasion of the North was under consideration: Should we defeat General Hooker in a general engagement south of the Potomac any where in the v
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Second paper by Colonel Walter H. Taylor, of General Lee's staff. (search)
en thousand of General French. In this latter matter the evidence is against General Meade. General Hooker, on the 27th of June, 1863, telegraphed to General Halleck, from Poolesville: My whole forceived by General Halleck at nine A. M. On reaching Sandy Hook, subsequently, on the same day, General Hooker telegraphed as follows concerning the garrison at Harper's Ferry, under General French: I fiis evident that the garrison at Harper's Ferry was not embraced in the returns alluded to by General Hooker in his first dispatch. Although General Halleck refused these troops to General Hooker, theGeneral Hooker, they were immediately awarded to General .Meade on his assuming command when General Hooker was relieved. Without more accurate returns of the two armies at Gettysburg, we are left to form our concluGeneral Hooker was relieved. Without more accurate returns of the two armies at Gettysburg, we are left to form our conclusions as to their strength from the data given above. I put the Army of the Potomac at one hundred and five thousand, and the Army of Northern Virginia at sixty-two thousand of all arms-fifty thousan
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ille is very clear. The order directing your corps to move to the support of General Lee was received about the time General Hooker crossed the Rappahannock. Unfortunately, we had been compelled by the scarcity of forage to send off our wagons intot be borne in mind that the cavalry did not join General Lee at Gettysburg until late in the evening of July 2.112,000 Hooker telegraphs to Staunton, June 27, 1863: Strength of rank and file, 105,000; adding commissioned officers not included in aed not an in inch of ground and the enemy could not be pursued. After the battle of Chancellorsville matters stood thus: Hooker in my front, with an army more than a hundred thousand strong; Foster preparing to advance into North Carolina; Dix prepa crossed the Potomac, orders were issued countermanding the advance of Foster and Dix. As soon as my Second corps crossed Hooker loosened his hold, and Old Virginia was freer of Federal troops than she had ever been since the commencement of the war.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
8th of June, that the Federal army, then under Hooker, had crossed the Potomac. Those brigades crosge before it crossed the Potomac, in which, if Hooker's telegrams are to be accepted as correct, ours' being left behind, as already stated. Even Hooker, who estimated our force that passed through Hle itself. It must he borne in mind that when Hooker moved from the banks of the Rappahannock, his exact figures. On pages 417-8, he says: General Hooker had had in mind, as a part of his operatio0,000 or 11,000 men under General French. General Hooker's intention had been to take that garrisont also have increased, and accordingly we find Hooker telegraphing to Halleck on the 27th of June, af Professor Bates that the 105,000 reported by Hooker had been reduced to only 72,000 between the 2 opportunity to strike him a fatal blow. When Hooker was crossing the Potomac at Edwards' Ferry, it hin to fulfill General Lee's expectations, as Hooker immediately threw one corps to Knoxville, on t[2 more...]
afternoon of this day I was ordered, after great fatigue and hunger endured by my soldiers, to take position near the Hagerstown pike, in an open field in front of In my official report erroneously called St. Mumma Church. Dunkard Church. General Hooker's Corps crossed the Antietam, swung round with its right on the pike, and, about an hour before sunset, encountered my division. I had stationed one or two batteries upon a hillock, in a meadow, near the edge of a corn field and just by the hrough the woods and the standing corn, over the ploughed land and clover, the line of fire swept to and fro as one side or the other gained a temporary advantage. Hood was now fighting with his right toward the main line of the enemy, for General Hooker had swept round so far, that, as we have said, his line was almost at right angles with its original position. Hood threw himself into the action with great gallantry, and says in his report: Here I witnessed the most terrible clash of arms
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