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t marched back to Petersburg, and thence towards Suffolk — a movement I never could satisfactorily account for, and which proved unfortunate, since it allowed General Hooker, who had superseded Burnside the latter part of April, to cross the Rappahannock and attack General Lee in the absence of one-half of his Army. The transcend refuge upon Stafford Heights. But alas! at a terrible sacrifice, an irreparable loss to the Confederacy: the immortal Jackson. I had received information of Hooker's anticipated advance, and was most anxious to rejoin my old'chief, General Lee. Never did I so long to be with him as in this instance, and I even proceeded so ough separated from me. I have always had you in my eye and thoughts. I wished for you much in the last battle, and believe had I had the whole Army with me, General Hooker would have been demolished. But God ordered otherwise. I grieve much over the death of General Jackson--for our sakes, not for his. He is happy and at pea
e produced to testify to the truth of my assertion. It would, indeed, seem strange that, after battling three long years with the same enemy, wearing the same uniform, and bearing the same colors, I should be so grossly deceived as to make a false report, especially when I had a full view of this same enemy in an open field, within a distance of four to five hundred yards. Since the foregoing was penned, General Carson, of the Federal Army, who is now engaged in writing an account of General Hooker's operations, informs me that it was a portion of General Butterfield's command which appeared on the Canton road, and fired into my column. I did not fall back, and form across the Canton road, as General Johnston states; his chief of staff overtook me too soon to allow this movement; in accord with General Mackall's instructions, I marched back to join Polk's right, which had remained in the same position I had left it. Whilst Major Austin was still engaged with this same enemy on
, for the purpose of skirmishing, and delaying the enemy — which work he properly left to the cavalry — he threw his colors to the breeze, and, with martial music, marched to the line of Gordonsville and Fredericksburg. A few months later, when the Federals appeared in his front, he marshaled his forces, which, refreshed by their long rest, were anxious for battle; he at once attacked, defeated the enemy, and pursued him to the Potomac. He thus drove back, successively, Pope, Burnside, and Hooker. After the battle of Gettysburg, Meade likewise followed Lee south of the Potomac. Again, he marched to the line of the Rapidan, as in the first instance, leaving his cavalry to observe and check the advance of the enemy. General Grant subsequently appeared in his front, with a large and well-equipped Army. Although our great chieftain had only about forty-five thousand (45,ooo) effective men wherewith to oppose him, he, true to his past history, attacked instantly — having cut roads t<
he counterbalancing quality. Again, few men are endowed with the capacity to execute such moves as those of Stonewall Jackson, at Second Manassas, and at Chancellorsville, for the reason that, whilst en route to the rear of the enemy, the appearance of a light squad of their cavalry will cause a majority of officers to halt, form line, reconnoitre, and thus lose time and the opportunity. Jackson's wagon train was attacked by Federal cavalry whilst he was marching to the rear and flank of Hooker, at Chancellorsville; he wisely paid little attention thereto, and moved boldly on towards the main object, and achieved a signal victory. I shall allow to pass unnoticed, in this reply several statements of General Johnston which, although equally erroneous and illiberal in spirit, are too trivial to demand my attention. I shall, therefore, end this unpleasant discussion with a brief reference to his unpardonable conduct towards me, after he again assumed command in North Carolina. He
y; and Thomas was crossing Peach Tree in line of battle, building bridges for nearly every division as deployed. There was quite a gap between Thomas and Schofield, which I endeavored to close by drawing two of Howard's Divisions nearer Schofield. On the 20th I was with General Schofield near the centre, and soon after noon heard heavy firing in front of Thomas's right, which lasted an hour or so, and then ceased. I soon learned that the enemy had made a furious sally, the blow falling on Hooker's Corps (the Twentieth), and partially on Johnston's Division of the Fourteenth, and Newton's of the Fourth. The troops had crossed Peach Tree creek, were deployed, but at the time were resting for noon, when, without notice, the enemy came pouring out of their trenches down upon them, they became commingled, and fought in many places hand to hand. General Thomas happened to be near the rear of Newton's Division, and got some field batteries in good position, on the north side of Peach Tre
riod. He erred likewise in attributing the lack of spirit in Hardee's troops to fatigue from the march of the night previous. Decatur is but six miles from Atlanta, and the detour required to be made was but slight. Beside, those troops had been allowed almost absolute rest the entire day of the 2 Ist. Stonewall Jackson made a hard march, in order to turn Pope at Second Manassas, and again to come up in time at Antietam, or Sharpsburg; as also at Chancellorsville, in order to fall upon Hooker's flank and rear. Longstreet likewise made hard marches, prior to the battles of Second Manassas and Gettysburg. The men were often required, under Lee, to perform this kind of service an entire day and night, with only a halt of two hours for sleep, in addition to the ordinary rests allowed on a march; and were then expected to fight two or three consecutive days. Indeed, in movements of this character, it is rare that a decided advantage is gained over an enemy, without the endurance of
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, V. (search)
y had; and, to carry it out, he was going to employ Hooker's command, at this time sent to re-enforce him. It ooga. That night the enemy under Longstreet fought Hooker on Lookout Mountain to retrieve this loss, but fail to creep round and there turn Bragg's flank, while Hooker was to turn the other flank on Lookout Mountain. Tr Sherman on Tuesday, on the left. On the right, Hooker was unexpectedly strengthened by a part of Sherman'tter than he had planned. At the mountain's front, Hooker displayed himself; and, while he thus occupied the earer and nearer the top of the mountain. By night Hooker was established there. The Wednesday morning waseally get away without further harm to himself. So Hooker was ordered across from Lookout Mountain to interru divert the enemy's increasing blows from Sherman. Hooker, coming behind them from Lookout Mountain, could do it; but no Hooker was to be seen. His speed had been checked by a destroyed bridge. He was on his way, but
welfth corps from the army of the Potomac, under the command of General Hooker, and he was assured of the fullest support by the government. . With wondrous energy, aided by his able subordinates; Thomas and Hooker, he had changed the aspect of affairs, loosened the clutch of the eew order of things in the army now, and especially at the west; and Hooker, who had chafed at the delays and want of vigor in the Peninsular cd success of the Union army. The reader knows the story well,--how Hooker on the right, climbing the precipitous sides of Lookout Mountain, dof operations, from Lookout Mountain on the right, down whose sides Hooker was driving the rebel left, to the extreme of Missionary Ridge on tr, Grant quietly but keenly watched the tide of battle, waiting for Hooker to get into the designated position, when he might order the attackopportunity for which he laid his plans, without waiting longer for Hooker, ordered the assault on the enemy's weakened centre. The troops ea
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter3 (search)
forcements as we asked for could be furnished to the army; that the whole country was applying for arms and troops; that he could take none from other points for that army, and could do no more to increase its strength than send it as many recruits as there were arms in our ordnance-store-twenty-five hundred. This, of course decided the question of active operations then. Mr. Davis then proposed some operations of a partisan character, especially an expedition, by a detachment, against Hooker's division, in Maryland, opposite to Evansport. I objected to this proposition, because we had no means of transporting any sufficient body of men to the Maryland shore quickly; and the Potomac being controlled by Federal vessels-of-war, such a body, if thrown into Maryland, would inevitably be captured or destroyed in attempting to return, even if successful against the land forces. Upon my declining such an enterprise, the conference terminated. The army had advanced to Fairfax Court
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 4 (search)
second route would be the most difficult to meet; for, as the march in Maryland would be covered by the Potomac, the Federal general might hope to conceal it from us until the passage of the river was begun, and so place himself at least two days march nearer to Richmond than the Army of Northern Virginia, on Bull Run. I did not doubt, therefore, that this route would be taken by General McClellan. The opinion was first suggested by the location of a division of the United States army General Hooker's. on it, opposite to Dumfries. On the 5th, information from Brigadier-General Whiting, of unusual activity in the division opposite to him — that referred to above-suggested that the Federal army was about to take the field; so I determined to move to the position already prepared for such an emergency — the south bank of the Rappahannock-strengthened by field-works, and provided with a depot of food; for in it we should be better able to resist the Federal army advancing by Manassa
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