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From Georgia. Atlanta, July 20. --The enemy made strong demonstrations yesterday and this morning on our right, near Decatur. Gen. Hood attacked their right at 4 o'clock this afternoon on Peach Tree Creek, near the Chattahoochee. In a few minutes the enemy were driven into their works. The colors of the 33d New Jersey and about 300 prisoners were captured from Hooker's corps. Our loss was not heavy; mostly slightly wounded. Brig Gen. Stevens, of South Carolina was wounded, it is feared mortally. Major Preston, formerly of Gen. Johnston's Staff, was killed. There was some skirmishing on our right, where the enemy attacked our entrenchments. After being repulsed, our cavalry, under Gen. Wheeler, drove them with repeated charges towards Decatur. Yesterday evening Reynolds's (Arkansas) brigade, which crossed Peach Tree Creek, drove the enemy back, taking two stands of colors and 130 prisoners. Our troops are in fine spirits to-night.
ition on the extreme left, Schofield having the left centre, Howard the centre, Hooker the right centre, and Palmer the extreme right. On the morning of the 19th of track. On the evening of the 19th and morning of the 20th of July, Howard, Hooker, and Palmer crossed the balance of their corps, forming a line of battle along te and sudden assault on Howard in great force. The attack soon extended to Hooker's corps, the rebels advancing three lines deep. A portion of our line at first hundred wounded on the field. Our loss will reach 2,000 men, principally from Hooker's corps. The rebel loss in killed, wounded, and missing exceeded six thousand,ely around Atlanta; and on the 23d (Friday) they had withdrawn entirely from Gens. Hooker and Palmer's front, and at 2 P. M. of that day portions of our army entered i Commercial puts down the official report of the loss in the four divisions of Hooker's corps at 1,713. Gresham, commanding one division, was wounded. The Washingt
e victory plainly won, and the only regret expressed among the men is, that the officers in command were, as they believe, in the present in stance, over-prudent in pitting probability against what seemed a certainly. Our losses in the affair will doubtless not fall short of a thousand or twelve hundred men. Six hundred and five killed and wounded have been reported in the corps of General Stewart. Our captures are two or three stands of colors and some three or four hundred prisoners. Hooker's corps is reported by prisoners to be badly crippled. General Stevens was shot while leading his men, the ball entering behind the right ear and lodging in the brain, from which it has not, up to this writing, been removed. His horse was killed at the same moment, and two men who went to his relief were wounded. One may judge of the severity of the enemy's fire from these statements.--General Stevens will probably be sent to Macon to morrow, and, if possible, from that point homeward
al Stoneman and five hundred of his command. General Iverson's men are still capturing stragglers. Howell Cobb; Major General. Major General Stoneman, who has been captured, is one of the best cavalry officers in the Yankee service. He will be remembered by our citizens as the commander of the expedition which made the raid around Richmond early in the month of May, 1863. It was during the strategic movements and fighting on the Rappahannock, which resulted so disastrously to Hooker, that a large force of cavalry crossed the Rapidan with the view of cutting off General Lee's army from his base of supplies at Richmond. Dividing into detachments, one under the command of Kilpatrick, (who has since been wounded in Georgia and retired from the service,) one under Wyndham, and one under Davis, they damaged the railroads to some extent and plundered the inhabitants heavily on their route. The damage was soon repaired, however, and the raid, so far as its main object was con
The following is condensed from the news summary of the Baltimore Gazette of the 4th instant: The most important announcement this morning is the probable change in the chief command of the Army of the Potomac. The Washington correspondents of the New York Tribune, the World and the Herald, all concur in stating that General Hooker has been ordered to report to the Adjutant-General at Washington, for the purpose, it is supposed, of succeeding to the command now held by General Meade. It is intimated that General Early, whose forces still occupy such postions west of Harper's Ferry as have been selected by him to protect the Valley of the Shenandoah against an advance of Federal troops in that direction, has probably been reinforced by the troops that were recently sent from Petersburg to the north bank of James river to meet Hancock's threatened attack. A skirmish has taken place near Cumberland between the Federal forces under General Kelly and a body of Confe
iers from the Lincoln Hospital attacking a number of colored men. For a time the affair threatened to be serious, stones, brickbats and crowbars being extensively used. Finally, a colored man got an axe and made an assault upon the soldiers, killing one, and wounding another, it is believed, mortally. The soldiers finally set fire to the shanties, and some half dozen of them were burned. The police at last succeeded in quelling the riot, and made many arrests. Miscellaneous. General Hooker reached Washington Thursday night and was serenaded. He made a speech about putting down the rebellion with bullets, bayonets, and so on, for half an hour. The death of the Rev. Daniel Waldo, at Syracuse, New York, at the advanced age of one hundred and two years, reduces the number of Revolutionary pensioners to eleven. Colorado Jewett telegraphs the New York Herald that Ben Wood, Dean Richmond, and a number of other Democrats, are now at Niagara Falls, consulting with Clay,
onsiderable loss. Both armies are engaged in strengthening their defensive works. A few days since fifty rebel deserters attempted to come into our lines in a body, but our troops, not understanding their intentions, fired on them, and twenty-nine of the number were killed or wounded. Miscellaneous. A dispatch from Fort Smith, Arkansas, says that the rebels, under Generals Cooper, Gaines and Standwaite, were defeated near that place on the 31st ultimo. They were in full retreat, pursued by the Union forces. Lincoln has revoked General Hunter's order banishing rebel sympathizers from Central Maryland. General Hooker has not been assigned to any command yet. He will visit New York. Admiral Dahlgren has published a letter attempting to prove that his son, Ulric, did not write the orders found on his person. The so-called Governor Hahn, of Louisiana, has arrived in Washington. The last quotation of gold in New York is two hundred and fifty-seven.
, however, of what we consider the main design of the enemy in all these desultory and perplexing operations along the Upper Potomac, we think the panic-stricken yeomanry of the Pennsylvania border have some reason for their alarm. The rebellion now is in serious danger of a violent death from strangulation. Grant has it by the throat at Richmond, and cannot be made to relax his hold, except by some desperate and formidable diversion that will compel him, as McClellan was compelled, and as Hooker was compelled, to turn his back upon Richmond in order to save Washington. That this great design underlies all these guerrilla movements along the Maryland border we do most seriously believe. We dare say that Early, Breckinridge, Mosby, Imboden and Company are for the present engaged in the important work of providing, at convenient stations, all the way up the Shenandoah Valley, the depots of supplies necessary to enable an army of sixty or eighty thousand men to move down in light
nd it must come at last. If the Republicans, with their unsparing efforts, could do nothing against the South, it is not to be imagined that the Democrats, with their half-and-half policy, could do any more. If McClellan is to be their champion, we know already what may be expected. The armies of the North would be more prudently handled, and, after a check, would be more expeditiously withdrawn; but they would certainly make no more impression on the South than the armies of Grant or Hooker. It appears to us, then, that if the Democratic party make a fight for power, they must do it substantially on principles of peace, and the events of the next few weeks will probably enable us to anticipate the result. The London Army and Navy Gazette says: Pending the great Presidential contest in the North, on which the attention of all men in America is fixed, as upon its result hangs the issue of peace or war for the year 1865, nothing so decisive has occurred lately in t
ended to his business and spoke little. They sent him to Western Virginia--a small theatre — when Beauregard was at Manassas and Johnston at Winchester; he went, and made no comment. The campaign failed; they called him Turveydrop; he did not attempt to excuse himself. Soon we find him in a blaze of glory, the hero of the battles around Richmond. He is still silent. He marches to Manassas, and achieves another great victory; not a word escapes him. He takes Winchester; is foiled at Sharpsburg for the want of men; defeats Burnside at Fredericksburg; Hooker at Chancellorsville; but he breaks not his silence. He has the terrible trial of Gettysburg. He only remarked. It was my fault; and then, in the present year, he has conducted this greatest of all his campaigns — undoubtedly one of the finest in war. Silent still. When will he speak? Has he nothing to say? What does he think of our affairs? Should he speak, how the country would hang upon every word that fell from him!
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