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ral rebel prisoners — among the latter Brigadier General Young of Cheathaur's command. There are no breaks on the Chattanooga road, though the rebel cavalry are prowling near the line. A force of five hundred crossed the track near last night, fifteen miles south of Nashville. The Prison at Shelbyville were attacked of a body of rebel cavalry on Monday night after some severe skirmishing to rebels retired. Skirmishing at the front is of daily occurrence. There is no change in Hooker's position. In every skirmish, so far, the Union troops appear to have had the advantage. Our forces have evacuated Shelbyville, and it is now in the hands of the rebels. Opinions are rife as to Hood's movements. Ample preparations have been made, and are making, to defend Nashville, should he attempt is capture. The following, from the Heralds account, shows what a cheerful effect was produced in Nashville by the "victory" of Thomas: Great panic prevails among the peo
ampaign. Our forces were not entrenched on the 20th of July, when the battle of Peachtree creek was fought. Newton's division, whose position was on the left of Hooker's corps, were building a barricade of rails when the enemy's columns rushed against them, but Hooker's men, on whom the heaviest of the fighting fell, had no protHooker's men, on whom the heaviest of the fighting fell, had no protection. Ward's division, everybody who has read of the battle knows, met the enemy's charge by a counter-charge, and the opposing masses were in the open field and the hostile ranks were mixed, and the fighting hand- to-hand, before the rebels were routed.--If the Gazette's historian does not believe this, let him go to General Hooker and inquire whether his men were entrenched on the 20th of July last!--"All rebeldom now" (after the battle of the 20th), the Gazette says, "took the alarm and lost confidence in Johnston." The farewell address of General Johnston was dated on the 17th and issued on the 18th of July. The battle of the 20th was Hood's first
States hopes to conquer a peace. Those concessions are made, be it remembered, in the face of those successes which have caused such croaking and despondency among the nervous and dyspeptic of our own people, after the defeat of Hood, the capture of Savannah, the triumph, by overwhelming odds, at Fort Fisher. These temporary advantages have not extinguished in Yankee minds memories of Bull Run, the two battles of Manassas, the defeat of McClellan, the defeat of Burnside, the defeat of Hooker, the defeat upon defeat of Grant, who started from the Rapid Ann for Richmond nearly a year ago with the largest army the United States ever has raised, or ever will raise, and has not got here yet. The conquest of such a nation by force of arms, even the United States military leaders see to be impossible, unless the great heart of the country gives way, and our own traitor doubts and fears deliver up the keys of the citadel. We have never been of those who denied the Yankees the quali
er skirmishing on that and the following day, on the 7th passed back our advanced troops to Mill Creek gap. On the same day Brigadier-General Canty reached Resaca with his brigade, and was halted there. On the 8th, at 4 P. M., a division of Hooker's corps assaulted Dug gap, which was bravely held by two regiments of Reynolds's Arkansas brigade and Grigsby's brigade of Kentucky cavalry, fighting on foot until the arrival of Lieutenant-General Hardee with Granbury's brigade, when the enemy wood's corps was placed with its centre at New Hope church, and Polk's and Hardee's ordered between it and the Atlanta road, which Hardee's left was to cover. An hour before sunset, Stewart's division, at New Hope church, was fiercely attacked by Hooker's corps, which it repulsed after a hot engagement of two hours. Skirmishing was kept up on the 26th and 27th. At half-past 5 P. M., on the 27th, Howard's corps assailed Cleburne's division, and was driven back about dark with great slaughter. I
either funds or supplies to any person now in captivity. Such parcels or remittances as may have accumulated since the last shipment, or may hereafter arrive, will be returned to the shippers. John E. Mulford, Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant General of Exchange. Miscellaneous. Lincoln has now nominated Hugh B. McCullogh for his Secretary of the Treasury. The Senate of Kentucky has rejected the constitutional amendment abolishing slavery in the United States. Major General Hooker is in Washington, to testify about his defeat at Chancellorsville. The Toronto Globs states that Burley will be tried at Port Clinton, Ottawa county, Ohio, on the charge upon which he was extradited, namely: robbery.--If acquitted, he will have a safe convoy out of the United States, Mr. Seward having written to that effect to Mr. Russell, the United States district attorney at Detroit, who will conduct the prosecution. It is not yet known when the trial will commence. Lambert
n the 27th, in the afternoon of that day, the Tiger was towed into the Rappahannock by the gunboat Banshee, Captain --, in order to clear a rope which had fouled the propeller, and anchored under Windmill Point near the Commodore Reed, Lieutenant Commander Hooker, say within five hundred yards of the shore. Lieutenant Hooker informed Lieutenant Evans that he had intelligence that was reliable that about one thousand of Mosby's men were in the immediate neighborhood, and that they had been undeLieutenant Hooker informed Lieutenant Evans that he had intelligence that was reliable that about one thousand of Mosby's men were in the immediate neighborhood, and that they had been under arms all the previous night, and expected some trouble from them that night. About dark the rumbling of wheels was heard distinctly by the officers and men on board the Tiger, which was supposed to be the wheeling of artillery.--About 8 P. M. a volley of musketry was heard issuing from the woods, near the beach, and a few minutes afterwards the guard ship opened fire and shelled the woods. Not knowing exactly what the trouble was, but apprehending a foe in that direction, the Tiger's cr
sat down together. They seemed very friendly. Stanton had his arm around Seward's neck, and constantly whispered in his ear. Welles sat by himself, and nobody spoke to him. Andy Johnson talked to everybody. Chief Justice Chase sat erect and dignified, evidently reflecting that he ought to be in Lincoln's place. Senator Sumner stood prominently forward, as if to attract attention. Negroes excluded ladies from the rear of the platform. Every black face beamed with joy and pride. Major-Generals Hooker and Ingalls were in sight. Colonels and captains were as plentiful as roses in June. The President smiled to himself and seemed greatly to enjoy the sunshine which now streamed upon him. He was dressed in black, with a plain frock coat. In his hand he held a printed copy of his inaugural address. The marshals of the day were grouped around the President, swelling with pride, and often excluding him from sight.--The planks of the platform were wet, and the airy position ra
efence, if not for attack. From all the outer garrisons and troop depots the rebel army at the capital is being augmented. Silently but surely the storm is gathering. Let us not be too sanguine of success. It may be that the rebel General will make it a Waterloo for us, while upon him, through the smoke of that day's battle, will shine the sun of a second day's Austerlitz. Lee will not throw away a single chance. He is not the man of Lost Opportunities.--Had Lee had command of our armies at the outset of war, we verily believe the rebellion would have been crushed in less than eight months. But we had only such second-rate Undertaker as Burnside and Hooker, Butler and Pope. Let us trust that our Lieutenant-General may be thoroughly prepared for the conflict; that when the conflict comes, our immense plurality of men may not be driven to their deaths in vain attempts to accomplish an impossible purpose, and that for once our leaders may be equal to their Herculean task.
Illness of General Hooker. --General Hooker, Commander of the Department of the East, is dangerously sick at his home, in New York city. He has for a few days been in a doubtful condition, though his symptoms are now more favorable. His disease is erysipelas in the head. He has no visitors, and no business is allowed to trouble him. Illness of General Hooker. --General Hooker, Commander of the Department of the East, is dangerously sick at his home, in New York city. He has for a few days been in a doubtful condition, though his symptoms are now more favorable. His disease is erysipelas in the head. He has no visitors, and no business is allowed to trouble him.
Military against civil law in New York. --Major-General Hooker made a return, yesterday, to the writ of habeas corpus issued in relation to Robert Martin, one of the alleged city incendiaries, at present confined in Fort Lafayette. The return refuses to produce Martin on the ground that he is a military prisoner and outside the power of the civil law. Judge Leonard, before whom the case was argued, decided that the body of Martin should be produced in court at 11 o'clock on Wednesday nexts corpus issued in relation to Robert Martin, one of the alleged city incendiaries, at present confined in Fort Lafayette. The return refuses to produce Martin on the ground that he is a military prisoner and outside the power of the civil law. Judge Leonard, before whom the case was argued, decided that the body of Martin should be produced in court at 11 o'clock on Wednesday next, or he would be compelled to issue an attachment against General Hooker for contempt of court.--New York Herald.
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