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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 5 (search)
turned by the eight field-pieces belonging to General R. H. Anderson's command. That officer, observing that a division Hooker's. of Federal troops had entered the wood a thousand yards to the right of Fort Magruder, placed Wilcox's brigade before e dead and wounded of both parties lay, supposed that of the enemy to be from three to five times greater than ours. General Hooker, on oath before the committee on the conduct of the war, said that his division alone lost seventeen hundred men. Abo necessarily left in the road where we found them. Longstreet reported nine thousand men of his division engaged with Hooker's and Kearney's divisions on the right. General Sumner, the ranking Federal officer on the field, stated that two-thirdsrates to their camps on Monday, although his statement shows clearly that all his troops and Keyes's Kearney's division; Hooker's was not engaged. that fought there were defeated, and driven back six or seven miles to the shelter of intrenchments pr
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
mainder to the ground then occupied by Kelly's troops, in front of our right. About four o'clock P. M., a division of Hooker's corps, said to be Geary's, assailed our outpost in Dug Gap-two very small regiments of Reynolds's Arkansas brigade, comma) and Austin's sharpshooters, in all about three hundred men. After advancing about a mile, this detachment encountered Hooker's (Twentieth) corps. Having the written order of his corps commander to hold his ground after meeting the enemy, Coloneld resolutely the attack of the overwhelming Federal forces. But, after a gallant So gallant a one that the commander of Hooker's leading division thought he was engaged with a brigade, at least. (See General Geary's report.) fight, he was, of courssday the 20th, on Peach-Tree Creek, and it was not either any demoralization on our side, nor the electric effect of General Hooker's presence on his troops, that saved him that day. Did not the troops fight well on the 20th and 22d, and everyw
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Memoranda of the operations of my corps, while under the command of General J. E. Johnston, in the Dalton and Atlanta, and North Carolina campaigns. (search)
they were constantly skirmishing till night of 12th. May 8th. Cleburne's division moved to Dug Gap, and assisted Grigsby's cavalry to repel attack of part of Hooker's corps. Walker had to be sent to Resaca, and moved subsequently to left front of Calhoun, to meet advance of McPherson. May 12th. At night my corps moved tbrigade of Stevenson's division. The engagement continued actively until night closed in, the enemy being repeatedly and handsomely repulsed at all points. Then Hooker's entire corps was driven back by three brigades of Stewart's division; prisoners taken were of that corps. Too much praise cannot be accorded to the artillery ud of June, the divisions of Stevenson and Hindman attacked the enemy, driving him from two lines of works, and capturing some prisoners belonging to Schofield and Hooker. From here the army changed position to the vicinity of Nickagack Creek, my corps on the left. We subsequently withdrew from this position, and took up a lin
ible fire, finally reached the schooner; but, finding her aground, made a breastwork of her and opened a deadly fire, which, with the assistance of a few shots from our long-range gun, drove the enemy back to a distant cover with loss, and the boats, after firing the schooner, returned without further molestation. Acting-master Furness estimates the loss of the rebels to be at least eight in killed and wounded, as he saw that number carried off. Our loss was one seriously wounded, Acting-master Hooker, and three very slightly. I have but praise to bestow on those engaged in the boats for their coolness and intrepidity when assailed by such overwhelming odds. They were yet some three hundred yards from the schooner when fired upon, but they preferred pushing on and returning through it, rather than fail in accomplishing their object. During the reconnoissance, last night, two of their despatch sloops were captured. A. Murray, Lieutenant Commanding. Flag-officer L. N. Goldsboro
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 162. affair of the schooner Maryland. (search)
Doc. 162. affair of the schooner Maryland. New York times account, Baltimore, Friday, Nov. 15, 1861. from Lieut. C. H. Colburn, of the Eleventh Massachusetts regiment, Company H, attached to Gen. Hooker's brigade, on the Maryland shore of the Potomac, and who arrived in this city this evening, I have the following interesting particulars of a rebel attack upon the schooner Maryland. The schooner was loaded with wood, and yesterday, while passing the rebel battery off Pig Point, and directly off the encampment of the Massachusetts Eleventh, became becalmed. The crew, immediately on perceiving preparations making by the rebels to attack their vessel from the Virginia shore, dropped their anchor, and taking to their boats, rowed away to the United States flotilla, which was anchored about four miles up the river. Lieut. W. L. Chandler, of the Eleventh, in command, and accompanied by Lieut. Colburn and two or three others, immediately leaped into a small boat and put off
ire subsided, I judge that the quantity of stores must have been considerable. The enemy fired but a few musket shot. I am, very respectfully, &c., R. H. Wyman, U. S. N., Lieutenant-Commanding Potomac Flotilla. The correspondent with General Hooker's Division, near Budd's Ferry, says of this affair: December 9, 1861. The lower Potomac was enlivened this morning by the gunboats of the upper flotilla shelling the woods and burning the buildings at Freestone Point, while about the same time there was a fine review of New Jersey troops on the Maryland side. At nine o'clock in the morning the New Jersey Brigade, recently arrived in General Hooker's Division, was reviewed and inspected by him. The day was one of the finest ever known in Maryland at this season. It was like a delightful day of the early Indian summer. The brigade, consisting of the Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth regiments, is under command of Colonel Starr, of the Fifth, an officer of extensive experie
t there is but one way to save the country and bring the authorities to their senses, and that is to say: I cannot guard Bermuda Hundred and Petersburg both, with my present forces. I have decided that Petersburg is the important point and will withdraw my whole command to that place to-night. It is arrant nonsense for Lee to say that Grant can't make a night march without his knowing it. Has not Grant slipped around him four times already? Did not Burnside retire from Fredericksburg, and Hooker from the Wilderness without his knowing it? Grant can get ten thousand or twenty thousand men to Westover and Lee know nothing of it. What, then, is to become of Petersburg? Its loss surely involves that of Richmond,--perhaps of the Confederacy. An earnest appeal is called for now, else a terrible disaster may, and I think will, befall us. Very respectfully, D. H. Hill, Major-General and Aide-de-Camp. [no. 71. see page 692.] Jackson, N. H., July 8, 1891. Gen. B. F. Butler : Dea
Jan. 16.--The army telegraph now consists of over one thousand miles of wire stretched through the different camps, from the headquarters of Gen. Hooker on the left, running towards the right wing till it reaches Hancock, Maryland. One hundred and ten Mr. Eckert, the Assistant Superintendent in charge of this Department, has run a separate line to the Headquarters of each general commanding a division. For instance, Gen. McClellan can sit at the table in his private house, and talk to the different generals, all at one and the same time, and independent of one another. When any division moves, the line can also be extended, as each division has a corps of builders, and a supply of wire, poles and insulators always ready. In several divisions each brigadier — general has an instrument upon the line, and is in direct conference with his immediate commanding general the whole time. Large wagons have been provided for the operators and their batteries to travel in, with sleepi
First and Ninth corps, under Generals Reno and Hooker, forming the right wing under General Burnsideable misfortune. About three o'clock P. M., Hooker's corps, of Burnside's column, moved up to thes to the Mountain House, on the main road. Gen. Hooker sent Meade, with the division of Pennsylvane mountain sides thus gallantly passed over by Hooker on the right of the gap and Reno on the left, untains, the cavalry, and the corps of Sumner, Hooker and Mansfield were ordered to pursue them via e attack. On the afternoon of the sixteenth Hooker's corps, consisting of Ricketts's and Doubledaennsylvania reserves, which was at the head of Hooker's corps, became engaged in a sharp contest wited between Hooker and the enemy in his front. Hooker's attack was successful for a time, but masses checked it. Mansfield brought up his corps to Hooker's support, when the two corps drove the enemy n Mansfield losing his life in the effort. Gen. Hooker was, unhappily, about this time wounded, an[4 more...]
r our heads. In two hours the broad fields on the south bank were swarming with Union soldiers drawn in line of battle. Hooker's and Franklin's grand divisions crossed below the city. The rebels occasionally opened their batteries from the mountaiscover his unhappiness. The army of the Potomac is composed of three grand divisions, commanded by Sumner, Franklin, and Hooker. Each grand division is divided into corps; each corps into divisions; each division into brigades; the brigades, of cou wind. At this time on the high, clear plain, this side the Rappahannock, and north-easterly from Fredericksburgh, was Hooker's grand division, drawn up in war's magnificently stern array, presenting a most superb and redoubtable appearance. An autes. I looked at my watch. Gen. Burnside put every man into action that went in at South-Mountain — that is, Reno's and Hooker's corps. Franklin took his in at Crampton's Gap. Tell----he must send me those boots, or I will be barefooted. I am qu
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