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ortunity that Grant was about to give him. At the very outset of the campaign he could strike the Federals in a position where superior numbers counted little. If he could drive Grant beyond the Rappahannock — as he had forced Pope, Burnside and Hooker before him — says George Cary Eggleston (in the History of the Confederate war ), loud and almost irresistible would have been the cry for an armistice, supported (as it would have been) by Wall Street and all Europe. Meade learned the positiith the success of brilliant flank movement. The graveyard of three campaigns As this photograph was taken, May 12, 1864, the dead again were being brought to unhappy Fredericksburg, where slept thousands that had fought under Burnside and Hooker. Now, once more, the sad cavalcade is arriving, freighted still more heavily. The half-ruined homes, to which some of the dwellers had returned, for the third time become temporary hospitals. It was weeks before the wounded left. The Wilderne
led against the Federal left, driving it back. But at this point the Twentieth Army Corps under Hooker, of Thomas' army, dashed against the advancing Confederates and pushed them back to their formertures are seen the entrenchments which the Confederates had hastily thrown up and which resisted Hooker's assaults on May 25th. For two days each side strengthened its position; then on the 28th the there was not what might be called a pitched battle. Late in the afternoon of the first day, Hooker made a vicious attack on Stewart's division of Hood's corps. For two hours the battle raged without a moment's cessation, Hooker being pressed back with heavy loss. During those two hours he had held his ground against sixteen field-pieces and five thousand infantry at close range. The name H them, Hood abandoned the city, and the next day, September 2d, General Slocum, having succeeded Hooker, led the Twentieth Corps of the Federal army within its earthen walls. Hood had made his escape
led against the Federal left, driving it back. But at this point the Twentieth Army Corps under Hooker, of Thomas' army, dashed against the advancing Confederates and pushed them back to their formertures are seen the entrenchments which the Confederates had hastily thrown up and which resisted Hooker's assaults on May 25th. For two days each side strengthened its position; then on the 28th the there was not what might be called a pitched battle. Late in the afternoon of the first day, Hooker made a vicious attack on Stewart's division of Hood's corps. For two hours the battle raged without a moment's cessation, Hooker being pressed back with heavy loss. During those two hours he had held his ground against sixteen field-pieces and five thousand infantry at close range. The name H them, Hood abandoned the city, and the next day, September 2d, General Slocum, having succeeded Hooker, led the Twentieth Corps of the Federal army within its earthen walls. Hood had made his escape
on, Ga. Union, Second Division of Fourteenth Corps and Cavalry, Army of the Cumberland. Confed., Gen. Johnston's command. Losses: Union, 16 killed, 59 wounded. May 18, 1864: Bayou de Glaize or Calhoun Station, La. Union, Portions of Sixteenth, Seventeenth Corps, and Cavalry of Nineteenth Corps; Confed., Gen. Taylor's command. Losses: Union, 60 killed, 300 wounded; Confed., 500 killed and wounded. May 19-22, 1864: Cassville, Ga. Union, Twentieth Corps, Maj.-Gen. Hooker; Confed., Gen. Johnston's command. Losses: Union, 10 killed, 46 wounded. May 20, 1864: Bermuda hundred, Va. Union, Tenth and Eighteenth Corps, Army of the James; Confed., Gen. Beauregard's command. Losses: Union, 702 killed and wounded. Confed., (estimate) 700 killed, wounded, and missing. Siege of Petersburg. While the navy was perfecting the blockade along the coast, General Grant at Petersburg was trying to get across Lee's entrenchments. In the
ht be added to their height. in the open, was repulsed, but later sat down behind entrenchments in front of Rosecrans at Chattanooga, and almost starved out the Federal army before it could be relieved. Grant attacked Bragg to drive him off. Hooker was successful at Lookout Mountain, but Sherman did not make any headway against the right of the Confederate army, being checked before the heavy trenches. Grant ordered Thomas' men to take the works at the foot of Missionary Ridge and halt. Baign to Atlanta can be had unless the difficult character of the country and the formidable nature of these artificial defenses are remembered. Returning to the armies of the Potomac and of Northern Virginia, we find that, at Chancellorsville, Hooker lost precious time by stopping, after attaining Lee's flank, and entrenching, instead of making an immediate attack; and another entrenched line — this time of value — was taken up after Howard Engineers. For its murderous artillery fir
were made possible under conditions never before encountered in a great war. The inception of the present Corps of Engineers in the When the bridge was finished at Franklin's crossing April 29, 1863 Hopeful and proud these pontoniers of Hooker's engineer battalion stand upon their just-completed bridge — rushed across in one hour and ten minutes. The bridge train, wagons and boats, had been masked about a mile from the river in dense woods. Then the boats were carried to the river at been chopped down, but here the earth, freshly upturned to make an approach to the bridge, and the little pup-tents just going up across the river, both indicate that the soldiers have just arrived. They were not aware that Jackson was to circle Hooker's right in the woods, take him in reverse and cut him off from United States Ford — and that he was to be huddled into a corner in the Wilderness, hurrying messages to Sedgwick's corps to come to his relief. This bridge, three hundred and ninety
as relieved and while the Army of the Potomac was lying at Fredericksburg under Hooker, the construction corps experimented busily with portable trusses and torpedoestographs that instructed the Federal armies in bridge-building while you wait. Hooker's first plan of operations, given in confidence to General Haupt, required larg. After he was removed, and while the army was lying near Fredericksburg under Hooker, the construction corps was experimenting with trusses and torpedoes; and the Ustruction of rails was perfected. The battle of Chancellorsville was fought; Hooker was repulsed, and the same annoyances of guerrilla raids were experienced on tht this point-bridgeport, Alabama previously felt elsewhere. On June 28, 1863, Hooker was relieved by General Meade. The crucial period of the war came at Gettysburel McCallum soon gave an affirmative answer, and the result was the transfer of Hooker, with two corps, about twenty-two thousand men, over twelve hundred miles in el
ured and the crew was taken to Philadelphia. There, Walter W Smith, prize-master, was tried for piracy in the United States Court, October 22-28th, and was convicted. Soon after the news reached Richmond, the following order was issued: Awaiting transportation to a Northern prison, 1863 In this photograph appear more of the prisoners represented on the previous page, captured at the battle of Chattanooga, November 23, 24, and 25, 1863. In the background rises Lookout Mountain, where Hooker fought his sensational battle above the clouds, driving his opponents from every position. Their work is over for the present; in a few days more these prisoners will be shivering in the unaccustomed climate of the North. Shelter was provided for such unfortunates in Federal prisons, but fuel was often scanty and in some cases wholly lacking. The Northern winters destroyed many Southern lives. The medical and surgical attendance of the prisoners was unsatisfactory on both sidles; 10,000
one with amputation of thigh, and one who refused to submit to amputation—I never amputated a limb without consent of the wounded man—after the nature of his case had been fully explained to him. Despite all arguments and reasoning, this man refused amputation, was greatly depressed and despondent from the first, and died on December 23d, as Hospital work in a farm-house after the battle of fair oaks The old farm-house in this photograph was serving as a hospital for the troops of Hooker's division after the battle of Fair Oaks, in the month of June, 1862, when Mc-Clellan had made his passage up the Peninsula in his celebrated campaign against Richmond. It lay to the right of the battlefield. To it the wounded were hurried in ambulances. The earliest arrivals were placed in the interior of the house and the slave-hut immediately adjacent. Those who were brought in later rested in the tents shown in the lower photograph. Patients are visible in the windows of the buildin
one with amputation of thigh, and one who refused to submit to amputation—I never amputated a limb without consent of the wounded man—after the nature of his case had been fully explained to him. Despite all arguments and reasoning, this man refused amputation, was greatly depressed and despondent from the first, and died on December 23d, as Hospital work in a farm-house after the battle of fair oaks The old farm-house in this photograph was serving as a hospital for the troops of Hooker's division after the battle of Fair Oaks, in the month of June, 1862, when Mc-Clellan had made his passage up the Peninsula in his celebrated campaign against Richmond. It lay to the right of the battlefield. To it the wounded were hurried in ambulances. The earliest arrivals were placed in the interior of the house and the slave-hut immediately adjacent. Those who were brought in later rested in the tents shown in the lower photograph. Patients are visible in the windows of the buildin
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