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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Events leading up to the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
let the men get it from them, but I can have nothing seized by the men. If General Hooker's army remains inactive, you can leave two brigades to watch him, and withd have read already, showing that he crossed the Potomac east of the army of General Hooker, so as to render it extremely difficult, if not impossible, for him to compstates that General Stuart, on reaching the Maryland side, ascertained that General Hooker had already crossed the Potomac, and that on the day before (June 27th) hisuch valuable time in pursuing and capturing trains coming from that city to General Hooker's army, but as he moved northward the Federal army was also moving northwarom that fact, in view of the positive orders that Stuart had received, that General Hooker's army had not yet crossed the Potomac. He remained at Chambersburg from tts of the Confederate army into Pennsylvania had failed to withdraw that of General Hooker from Virginia, contrary to his confident expectation, General Lee began to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
the west, was supporting him. Longstreet was facing east; Hooker in his front, was, of course, facing west. General Lee's much unmolested as the whole army could perform with General Hooker in its front. * * * If your advance causes Hooker to cHooker to cross the Potomac, or separate his army in any way, Longstreet can follow you. So on June 19th it was uncertain whether Long will follow to-morrow. General Lee was then satisfied of Hooker's purpose to cross the Potomac. During the time that Stuace of routes was given to Stuart. General Lee says:If General Hooker's army remains inactive, you can leave two brigades tngstreet's flank as he was by the route he took in rear of Hooker. He did not, as he says, order Stuart to put Hampton in c cavalry was needed, than from Chambersburg. He knew that Hooker's army had crossed the river, and was holding the South MoIf when General Lee was at Hagerstown he had supposed that Hooker was still south of the Potomac he would not have moved nor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
tements have been so long overlooked. In the last days of June a scout of General Longstreet's, who had passed through Washington, and subsequently the Union army, arrived at General Lee's headquarters, in Chambersburg, with the information that Hooker's entire force had crossed the Potomac, and was moving northward, imperilling the Confederate communications with the South. This made necessary the immediate drawing in of the widely-sundered Confederate divisions. Changed his mind. It ising order, found on page 943, Part 3, Volume XXVII, of the War Records. headquarters army of Northern Virginia, Chambersburg, June 28, 1863. Lieutenant-General R. S. Ewell, Commanding Corps. General,—I wrote you last night, stating that General Hooker was reported to have crossed the Potomac, and is advancing by way of Middletown, the head of his column being at that point, in Frederick county. I directed you in that letter to move your forces to this point. If you have not already progr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.25 (search)
almost-panic effect in these cities, it might be well to say that they had been comparatively free from such a visitation so close at home for about two years; not since the privateer Jefferson Davis was off the coast. But lately rumors had been threatening an attack on the New England coast by the Alabama and Florida. Moreover, this period was the climax of the Confederacy. It was straining every nerve in one grand effort. Stonewall Jackson had made his last, but splendid, march around Hooker's right flank at Chancellorsville, doubling him up, and leaving him hors de combat, and General Lee, with his victorious legions, was marching triumphantly into Pennsylvania. The ironclad Atlanta had been sent out from Savannah, Ga., with a view to raising the blockade and making a raid on the Northern cities, and demonstrations were being made in various directions to tighten the tension and prevent reinforcements from being drawn off to oppose Lee's advance. No wonder, then, that affai
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Longstreet-Gettysburg controversy [from the Richmond (Va.) Dispatch, February 16, 1896.] (search)
f the Blue Ridge, in Loudoun county: If General Hooker's army remains inactive, you can leave two they were not moving northward. At that time Hooker was waiting quietly on General Lee; all of histon. When Lee crossed the river, of course Hooker would cross and maintain the same relative poquehanna and at the same time watch and report Hooker's movements on the Potomac? Marched day andwas immaterial so far as giving information of Hooker's movements was concerned whether Stuart crosscrossing he was required to go out of sight of Hooker, and to sever communication with General Lee. ight of the 28th he learned through a spy that Hooker was moving northward. This is equivalent to sagerstown on the 26th he knew that the bulk of Hooker's army was north of the river and holding the South Mountain passes. If Hooker had still been in Virginia there would have been nothing to preven On the morning of June 28th, at Frederick, Hooker was superseded by Meade. His army remained th[2 more...]