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How will the Yankees receive the news of the defeat of their great army under Hooker? Never before, if we may judge from their press, were they so jubilant with hope and expectation of a victory as they were when Hooker crossed the Rappahannock. Never before were they so inflated with gas and bombast — never so excessively rol itself! To cap the climax of this bombast, it is positively announced that Gen. Hooker remained behind at the crossing "to superintend the Cutting Loose of the Brillion and taking possession of all the wealth and good things of the South! In Hooker they beheld another Gideon, who was invincible. Puritanism thought he wielded re are you going?" by replying, "Back again!" was certainly one of their kith. Hooker might so reply.--He has certainly gone back again, whether he "cut the bridges" premature rejoicing, apparently cut off their own retreat, but we shall see them "go back" as easily as Hooker, and prepare probably for the eighth on to Richmond.
ches reach the ground and whose gnarled trunks nearly touch each other, and some idea may be had of the country in its natural condition. Here and there, an intervals of perhaps half a mile, was a cleared spot of from 50 to 100 acres. Upon these Hooker had thrown up his entrenchments, and behind them posted his artillery and infantry. In approaching them our forces had either to huddle in the narrow pass way, or feel their way as best they could through the woods above described. In additichmond would fall be fore the close of the week, basing their hopes upon, the great feats to be accomplished by Stoneman in the destruction of our lines of communication. Since the trains have commenced running through, and they have learned of Hooker's defeat, their spirits have greatly fallen, and they begin to realize that little hope exists of their reaching Richmond, save as prisoners of war. Address of Gen. Lee to his army. The following appropriate address has been issued by Ge
The Daily Dispatch: May 9, 1863., [Electronic resource], A Specimen — the Yankees in Goochland. (search)
leader of the brigands no doubt concluding that the threat was sufficient to make him disgorge if he had any money. The Doctor was then released, and proceeded on his route minus his medicines, but was immediately brought back a short distance and ordered off in a different route from that he was traveling. As he departed the commander said to him: "You will see us again in a few days, when we will burn you damned rebels entirely out!" This amiable threat was made upon the expectation that Hooker would soon be in Richmond. This body of the raid makers consisted, the Doctor supposed of to 1,200 or 1,500 men. They were commanded by an officer in the uniform of a Captain, but he was called Colonel. The Doctor politely asked his name, but was rudely ordered to answer questions but ask none. The column separated near the point of this arrest — part going to Ashland and a part continuing along the Three-Chop Road; the latter being no doubt the body which stopped Sunday night at Sho
Quiet. --The city was even more quiet than usual yesterday, the fact that Hooker had been driven across the Rappahannock having singularly enough dissipated every apprehension felt on account of the thieving raids of Stoneman's invincible cavalry. A rumor prevailed in the city, and caused some speculation, relative to a batch of late Yankee papers said to have been brought by Mr. Clayton, of Baltimore, since the last fight. Rumors represents all the Yankee journals as concurring in the ok having singularly enough dissipated every apprehension felt on account of the thieving raids of Stoneman's invincible cavalry. A rumor prevailed in the city, and caused some speculation, relative to a batch of late Yankee papers said to have been brought by Mr. Clayton, of Baltimore, since the last fight. Rumors represents all the Yankee journals as concurring in the opinion that Hooker had sustained a terrible repulse, and that it was useless to make any further attempt to save the Union.