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ich renders their chances as good as they were when the campaign of 1863 opened. That circumstance is the possession of a General superior to any they have ever yet had. That Grant is a man of far more energy and ability than any that has yet commanded the army of the Potomac, cannot be denied. But, then, what sort of men have commanded it? The imbecile McDowell, the lying charlatan McClellan, the low, brutal, boasting poltroon Pope, the murdering coward Burnside, the drunken braggart Hooker, the timid, but gentlemanly Meade. That Grant is a much superior leader to all these, cannot be denied. And yet, it may be denied that he is a great General, since he has never done anything to prove that he is so. Let us see what he has done. We first hear of him at Belmont, where he was signally defeated and driven to his boats by Gen. Polk, and whence get dated a lying bulletin claiming the victory. He next appears before Fort Donelson, where, with eighty full regiments, an enormous f
The Yankee army of the Potomac. Not withstanding the bluster of the Yankee journals about the extensive preparations for the capture of Richmond, there can be no doubt that the army under Grant, on the Rappahannock, is much weaker numerically than that which was overwhelmed under Hooker a year ago at Chancellorsville. An officer who came down on the Central train last night informs us that our scouts report that the statement of heavy reinforcements to Grant are greatly exaggerated, and that the enemy's army, with all the reinforcements received up to this time, does not exceed 60,000. It is stated, how ever, that Grant is making preparations for an advance.
ickets walking dull and monotonous beats. Everything is life, animation, and activity, Burnside, after a long season of preparation, has quit Annapolis, and is once more about to essay the fortunes of war with the ill-fated Army of the Potomac. Hooker has also come to help Grant out of or into a difficulty, most probably the latter; and Grant, like the Irishman who was asked if he would take the woman to be his wedded wife, replied "Yes, and the niggers, too." For the first time in the historyirst, Second, Third, Fifth, and Sixth corps, which have been consolidated into three corps, the old Ninth army corps, formerly Burnside's, the Eleventh and Twelfth army corps, which have been merged into the Twentieth army corps, and placed under Hooker, also six thousand negroes — these latter forming Burnside's corps d'armee. From all that I can gather, the Yankee army comes entirely in obedience to the behest of power, and have little hopes of success. Our army is hopeful and buoyant, and wi
From North Georgia. Dalton, May 5. --Contrary to all expectations, the enemy have advanced but little to-day. One division of Hooker's corps is at Lee & Gordon's mills. Palmer's corps and one division are in front of Tunnel Hill, occupying our old picket station; Howard's corps and two divisions between Varnett's Station and Red Clay, all busily engaged outing roads, can swaying, and building bridges, Their advance will be necessarily very slow, Numerous deserters have come into our lines to day and given themselves up, saying that their time expires from the 10th to the 12th and none of them will fight in the approaching engagements.
s will be apparent to the reader upon the inspection of a good map. The distance from the Court-House to the Telegraph road is about eight miles, and to Fredericksburg it is eleven miles. It must be confessed that Grant has shown a good deal of cleverness in one respect, and that was in avoiding the route by Fredericksburg which proved so disastrous to Burnside. At the time Burnside moved down the north bank of the Rappahannock and attempted to cross at Fredericksburg, it is known that Hooker pointed out the route by which Grant has advanced as the better of the two; and it will be remembered when he succeeded to the command of the army, then occupying the heights of Stafford, he adopted his original plan in part and succeeded in getting as far as Chancellorsville. The thing which we have chiefly to regret is the loss of the devoted town of Fredericksburg, which has passed, temporarily at least, into the hands of the invader. We hear that Grant brought twenty two days supplies
The Daily Dispatch: May 18, 1864., [Electronic resource], Operations around Richmond — the battle not renewed yesterday — firing at Chaffin's Bluff — another steamer destroyed in St. John's river, &c. (search)
e, and communications are maintained as usual this morning. At Dalton there was heavy firing heard at Mill Creek Gap, which continued sharp till sunrise. It became slower when the train left, leaving the impression that the enemy had made two assaults upon Mill Creek Gap and were repulsed. No particulars have been received. The enemy continued still cautiously approaching our position on both wings and centre. It is reported they are 80,000 strong, in three columns, commanded by Thomas, Hooker, and Howard. Our forces are in excellent condition and spirits. No further particulars of the affair at Resaca. [Second Dispatch] Atlanta, May 12. --The telegraph is again working to Dalton. The press reports received state that the assault yesterday on the face of the ridge at Mill Creek Gap, at 2 o'clock A. M., was repulsed with great slaughter. The wounded of the enemy are unknown. Private reports from Dalton represent all quiet this morning. Among the prison
o much liquor, and that the war on the part of the North is conducted as if it were a matter of frolic and compact. Our lines were withdrawn a few hundred yards last night, and from the enemy's immediate front, for the purpose of improving their position. Not understanding exactly what the movement meant, Grant advanced with heavy force this morning at half-past 10 o'clock, but he seen discovered where the Confederate troops were, He was driven back with ease, and now at sunset is cowering behind his entrenchments in the Wilderness. His troops have not done as well as they did under McClellan, Burnside, or even Hooker. The Confederates, on the contrary, never fought better--Gen. Lee had caused it to be circulated among them some days ago that they must not think of defeat as possible; it was a thing not to be even dreamed of. Nobly have his invincible regions responded to the call of their great chief. Oh, that we may ever have such a leader and such an army! Sallust.
nday morning, we get the following interesting details of the above intelligence: About 10 o'clock yesterday morning Hooker's corps, backed by the whole Federal army, attacked three divisions of our army a little to the west of Resaca. Hooker'sHooker's corps had been in this vicinity for some time, and on Thursday night the whole of Sherman's army shifted down Sugar Valley towards Resaca. Before abandoning their position in front of Rocky Face Ridge and Bolton, the enemy on Thursday night seemed idently expected a small force at this point, and doubtless hoped to reach Johnston's rear unawares and cut him off. Hooker's corps opened the attack on three divisions of our army at 10 A. M. For three hours the roar of artillery and the rattle outward to the Ohio! The demonstrations of the enemy upon our flank and rear are as yet undeveloped. McPherson and Hooker seem to be the presiding spirits over these efforts to drive us from our great network of natural fortification. They ar
rs from the front be correct, remarks the Macon Telegraph, a most interesting and desperate game of strategy has been going on in the past few days, which probably found its solution yesterday, or will find it within a few hours.--The movement of Hooker's corps by way of Villanow, through Snake Creek Gap, if at first intended by the enemy as an isolated raid in Johnston's rear to take possession of Resaca and destroy the Oostenaula bridge no longer maintains that form. Immense columns of the enemy, with their trains of artillery and wagons, were on the 11th plunging down the valley west of the Chattanooga Ridge, and entering by Snake Creek Gap the plateau west of Resaca and the line of the railroad and joining Hooker's corps, already there. This gap has been left open to the enemy for a number of days. It is seventeen miles southwest of Dalton, and the next gap above it, in the same ridge, is Dug Gap, which we hold, and where the enemy has made repeated assaults in vain. Dug G
Sherman's field Marshals wounded. --Sher man's operations around Reach, which were protracted through three days cost him quite dearly. The enemy estimate their losses in front of Resaca at 4,000. Four Generals were wounded — Hooker, (lighting Joe,) slightly; Kilpatrick, the raider, who did not get as near Richmond as Dahlgren painfully; Manson, a Kentuckian, well known in Louisville, seriously; and Willich, it is believed, mortally. Willich is a German, and has figured in this army of the Cumberland, as it is called, ever since the war commenced. He entered as a lieutenant; subsequently commanded a regiment of lager beer drinkers from Cincinnati, and fought at the battle of Murfreesboro' as a General where he was captured by Gen Polk's division before breakfast. He has probably fought his last battle now.
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