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ollows: On Sunday morning firing commenced as usual, but nothing of particular importance occurred until 1 P. M. At that time a determined charge was made by Hooker's corps, which now occupied our left-Palmer, Howard, and Schofield having been shifted towards the right to fill up the gap occasioned by Hooker's withdrawal the Hooker's withdrawal the day before.--This charge was at first believed to be successful. The enemy were driven from a portion of their second lines, and Wood's brigade, of Butterfield a division, stormed a small fort and took a battery of four guns. The rebels, however, having massed on this part of the line very heavily the day before, our men were exed missing. We have doubtless killed and wounded two thousand of the enemy and taken sixteen hundred prisoners. Four of our Brigadier Generals have been wounded — Hooker, slightly; Kilpatrick, painfully; Manson, seriously; Willich, it is feared, mortally. Three General officers of the rebels are known to have been killed. Ou
From North Georgia. Battle Field, 8 Miles West of Marietta, June 6. --The enemy are still moving towards Altoona. Hooker's corps are fortifying the hills between Acworth and Atlanta. Heavy rains for the past two days here have made the roads almost impassable for artillery, and retarded movements considerably. Some slight skirmishing occurred near Lost Mountain yesterday. All quiet this morning. [Second Dispatch.] Atlanta, June 6. --Press reporters who left the front at noon report that our army is still moving towards the railroad, the right of the enemy having already crossed near Ackworth, and Hooker's corps is reported 5 miles east of it on the Altoona road. Gen. Johnston's headquarters are west of Marietta, with our left resting at Lost Mountain. Hardee is commanding the right, with Polk the left, and Hood the centre. The Yankee cavalry dashed into Big Shanty at 10 o'clock this morning, and were met by Williams's brigade who were fight
ountry more open. Details of the position of our troops and contemplated movements are given, but are not needed for public information. The dispatch further states that "the enemy is not in our immediate front; but his signals are seen at Lost Mountain and Kenesaw." Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Yankee account of Sherman's repulse on the 27th. The Herald publishes details of Sherman's repulse by Johnston on the 27th ult. The corps which suffered so severely was Hooker's. The writer says: For this desperate charge the troops now debouching through the thick woods were rapidly forming into line. Gens Howard and Wood superintended the movement themselves, and while doing so were repeatedly fired on by sharpshooters, severely wounding Capt Stenson, of Gen Howard's staff, and cutting Gen Howard's boot. Capt Beslow, Gen Wood's Adjutant General, and Capt McElvene, of his staff, had a narrow escape — the latter was struck by a speat ball. The troops
From North Georgia. Top of Kansas Mountain, via Marietta, June 15. --There has been considerable cannonading and skirmishing on our right and centre to day. The enemy advanced his lines the previous night very near ours, and both lines are distinctly visible from this point. The weather is beautiful, and the roads are rapidly drying. Loring is now in command of Polk's corps. Lieut. Elisha P. Gaines, of Ky., was captured by our scouts this morning. He says the enemy lost 1,500 in Hooker's fight with Stewart, on the 25th of May, and that it was a useless sacrifice of life on the part of the enemy.
From North Georgia. Three Miles this side of Marietta, June 16. --There was little skirmishing by the enemy on our batteries yesterday, and scarcely any replying. Sharpshooters were firing all day. The most of the wagons of the enemy were moved in front of the locality occupied by them yesterday. During the skirmishing yesterday Major Massey, of the 20th Mississippi, was killed. At five o'clock yesterday afternoon Hooker's corps made a charge on Cleburne's division in three lines of battle, and was repulsed with great slaughter. A few prisoners were taken, who confirm the above.--Cleburne's division fired 315 times with shot, shell and canister. The enemy was not able to bring his artillery to bear.
ve our line the intended direction. What position McPherson took after the success of his afternoon's work, I am not at liberty to state; let it be sufficient at present to say that he is some distance from the position he held on the 12th. Hooker's operations on the same day — also the other corps. Simultaneously with the movement of McPherson's troops the rest of the corps were advanced — Palmer directing himself towards the enemy's position on Kenesaw Mountain, Howard at Pine Mountain, the other corps filling up the gaps and participating in the general action. Hooker during the day made one of his magnificent assault is upon the enemy's works at the base of Los. Mountain. He soon carried their outer line of rifle pits, and charged with such impetuosity that he was not long in driving the enemy completely out of his first line of fortifications, forcing him up the mountain. In the position taken from the enemy Hooker remained, and after little labor placed it in a safe
In Georgia the Confederate cavalry are seriously interrupting Gen Sherman's communications. On the 18th inst, Gen Wharton, at the head of 2,500 men, captured and destroyed, on the railroad between Kingston and Dalton, five freight trains loaded with supplies for Sherman's army. Two days later two other freight trains, also loaded with supplies, were captured by the Confederates near Resaca. We have nothing to report from Sherman. Our last intelligence, it will be remembered, was that Hooker's corps captured the strong position occupied by the Confederates on Lost Mountain, but was subsequently compelled to abandon it. From Arenas. A telegram from St. Louis states that all the military posts between Cape Girardeau and Little Rock have been abandoned, and that the Confederates have regained all but a small portion of Arkansas. Lincoln's Foreign policy. In the Yankee House of Representatives, on Monday, Mr Davis, of Md., from the Committee on Foreign Relations, i
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n fact, the staples of domestic life have advanced rapidly on old prices, and still their tendency is upward. The Herald. does not conceal the discontent this condition of things is producing. In New York Major Gen Dix was arrested on the 1st instant and taken before judge Roosevelt, upon the charge of unconstitutionally suppressing the World and Journal of Commerce newspapers — He was afterwards released and the matter postponed to a future day. The Federal Gen Parker is dead and Hooker reported wounded, both in Sherman's army. The distinguished irishman, Smith O'Brien, is dead. We learn from the Chronicle that Gen Ewell is at Marietta, Ga., with his corps, en route to relieve Gen Johnston. In the Yankee Senate the joint resolution repealing the act prohibiting the sale of gold and foreign exchange was passed on the 1st instant, by a vote of ayes 24, nays 14 The House agreed to this action the same day, by ayes 88, nays 29. Congress cannot, however, agree up
s of Lee. His only idea of the science of war is that primitive one of overpowering an enemy by force of superior numbers. He has so many thousands or hundreds of thousands of men placed under his command. His way of utilizing the unhappy raw material is to hurl it against the enemy, regardless altogether of the loss of life.-- As Federal Generals are estimated over there by the magnitude of their achievements in this line, Grant must now be a hero of the first class. McClellan, Pope, and Hooker have slain their thousands, but Grant has slain his tens of thousands. Up to the 11th the Federal report confesses to a loss of 40,000 in seven days--40,000 killed, wounded, and missing. It is difficult to realize the full import of such an admission — the army of Wellington in the Peninsula, the British in the Crimea, the sum total of our countrymen who fought at Waterloo, lost in a week. As Grant's army appears to consist of four divisions, each, at the utmost, of 35,000 men, he must alr
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