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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 64 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Thomas Hopkinson or search for Thomas Hopkinson in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
e judges, the chaplain, and members of the bar and other gentlemen. He gathered, on these festive occasions, such guests as Chief Justices Parker and Shaw, Judges Prescott, Putnam, Wilde, Morton, Hubbard, Thacher, Simmons, Solicitor General Davis, Governor Lincoln, Josiah Quincy, John Pickering, Harrison Gray Otis, William Minot, Timothy Fuller, Samuel E. Sewall; and, among the clergy, Gardiner, Tuckerman, Greenwood, Pierpont, and Lyman Beecher. His son Charles, and his son's classmates, Hopkinson and Browne, were, once at least, among the youngest guests. He gave a dinner, in 1831, to surviving classmates; at which were present Pickering, Jackson, Thacher, Mason, and Dixwell. He made the duties and history of his office the subject of elaborate research. He read to the bar, and published in the American Jurist, July, 1829, a learned exposition of the points of difference between the office in England and in Massachusetts, stating clearly its duties in each jurisdiction, and gi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 4: College Life.—September, 1826, to September, 1830.—age, 15-19. (search)
Sophomore and Senior years; Jonathan F. Stearns, of Bedford, his chum in the Freshman year; Thomas Hopkinson, of New Sharon, Me.; and Charlemagne Tower, of Paris, N. Y. Of these, only Stearns and Towe church in Newark, N. J. He took high rank in college, and has fulfilled his early promise. Hopkinson received the highest honors in the class. He was as a student quite mature, and was older tha of the forty-eight members of his class were awarded parts. The highest honors were borne by Hopkinson, Stearns, Tower, and Andrews. Sumner's was an inferior part, not equal to his general abilityt, keeping even its existence a secret, and calling it The Nine, from their number. They were Hopkinson, Stearns, Sumner, Browne, Warren, Worcester, Appleton, Carter, and McBurney. They met in eachusing kind, to be read at the next meeting. On Nov. 2, 1829, Sumner read, in 22 Holworthy, Hopkinson's and Carter's room. an essay on the English Universities of Cambridge and Oxford, which he ha
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 5: year after College.—September, 1830, to September, 1831.—Age, 19-20. (search)
lled it, on his favorite classmates, Browne, Hopkinson, Hopkinson wrote, May 10, Leave off readi He gave a Byron to Browne, and a Milton to Hopkinson; and received from Browne Sterne's Sentimental Journey, and from Hopkinson a polyglot Bible. Sumner gave his classmate Kerr, in their Seniors to Browne. Of the letters to Browne and Hopkinson, the two classmates to whom he wrote most co unhappy; and he opened his heart frankly to Hopkinson, —a young man of mature reflection and six ytter stored than that of any of your class. Hopkinson rebuked Sumner's apprehension of failure in tame world and this tame reality of things. Hopkinson thus closed this thoughtful letter, which mun to the meeting-house, in which our friend Hopkinson walked amongst the corporation, professors, ock, when, as I was ascending the steps with Hopkinson, Browne presented himself before us. The exhg for which they need blush. McBurney and Hopkinson were here last evening, and spent in my room[4 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. (search)
acquaintance he then made; and with his classmate Hopkinson, who joined the school in the autumn of that year.e teachers, appear thus early warm and active. Hopkinson wrote, Oct. 28, 1831, taking him to task for assumman by man, and kill them all up by computation. Hopkinson, Jan. 6, 1832, calls him the indefatigable, ever-dice, patriotism, and the true Christian faith. Hopkinson wrote, July 17:— Congratulations are matter ofd a greater elasticity. Again, on May 9, 1833, Hopkinson wrote from Lowell, where he was practising law as cial to you. It would be a joyous event to me. Hopkinson wrote from Lowell, July 13:— Dear Charles,—Iiety. You kindly mentioned my sister. Tower, Hopkinson, Stearns, and Converse wrote to Sumner letters of s left Cambridge, and is for the winter at Salem. Hopkinson has also left, and is with H. H. Fuller in Boston.d wish particularly to be here on that day. Unless Hopkinson or Stearns or you perform the master's part, I dou<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 7: study in a law office.—Visit to Washington.—January, 1854, to September, 1834.—Age, 23. (search)
Chapter 7: study in a law office.—Visit to Washington.—January, 1854, to September, 1834.—Age, 23. Having finished his studies at Cambridge in Dec., 1833, Sumner entered as a student, Jan. 8, 1834, His father noted the day in his interleaved copy of Thomas's Farmer's Almanac. His classmate Hopkinson had desired Sumner to enter his office at Lowell, and Mr. Alvord also invited him to his office in Greenfield. the law-office of Benjamin Rand, Court Street, Boston; a lawyer having a large practice, but distinguished rather for his great learning and faithful attention to the business of his clients than for any attractive forensic qualities. Mr. Rand in the autumn of 1834 visited England, where he was well received by lawyers and judges. His partner, Mr. A. H. Fiske, remained in charge of the office. He had access to the remarkably well-stored library of Mr. Rand, which was enriched on the arrival of almost every English packet. He followed very much his tastes while in th<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
against parties who divert for mill-uses the waters of Merrymeeting Pond, which flow into the Lake. In June, 1835, he was appointed by Judge Story a commissioner of the Circuit Court of the United States, Office resigned by letter, Dec. 9, 1853, but vacated by law on his acceptance of the office of Senator, in 1851. and a year later was admitted to practice in that court. Sumner, at this period, succeeded as well as the average of young lawyers; but he did not, like his classmate Hopkinson, step into a lucrative practice, nor obtain the business which, with his laborious studies and many friends, he had expected. His docket was a slender one even for those days. He was too much absorbed in amateur studies to become a shrewd and ready practitioner; and his mind, while so employed, was the less inclined to the petty details of an office. His engagements at the Law School, yet to be mentioned, for the first three months of each year—the busiest season for a lawyer—seriously
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 9: going to Europe.—December, 1837.—Age, 26. (search)
Chapter 9: going to Europe.—December, 1837.—Age, 26. From his boyhood Sumner had longed to visit Europe, and with his reading of history this desire grew into a passion. The want of the necessary funds compelled him to postpone its gratification until he had in part earned them, and won friends who would advance the rest. A circumstance gleaned from the letters of Browne and Hopkinson, which occurred during his last year in the Law School, is significant of his earnestness in this direction. He nearly completed, at that time, a negotiation by which a gentleman was to defray his expenses for a year's travelling abroad, in consideration of certain personal services to be rendered at home. Its details are not preserved; but the two classmates, who did not hear of the proposed arrangement until it had fallen through, upbraided him in a friendly way for proposing to assume an obligation which they thought would compromise his personal independence. This strong desire, increasing