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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 36 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 17 3 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 3 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
ountry for the last hundred days with ability and constancy, and to them I tender my warmest thanks. All under their command I must leave without special notice, from the fact that otherwise the list would be too extended. For gallantry, efficiency, unflinching activity, and gentlemanly deportment I commend the different members of my staff, viz: Col. F. T. Sherman, chief of staff (captured while reconnoitering, July 7); Lieut. Col. J. S. Fullerton, assistant adjutant-general; Lieut. Col. C. H. Howard, assistant inspector-general; Lieut. Col. H. Hayes, chief quartermaster; Lieut. Col. D. Remick, chief commissary of subsistence; Surg. J. Theo. Heard, medical director; Capt. E. P. Pearson, Seventeenth U. S. Infantry, commissary of musters; Capt. Henry Kaldenbaugh, provost-marshal; Capt. Joseph A. Schoeninger, staff quartermaster; Capt. It. M. Stinson, aide-decamp (seriously wounded through the lungs, May 27); Capt. F. W. Gilbreth, aide-de-camp; Capt. E. H. Kirlin, volunteer aide-de
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 16 (search)
Gen. David S. Stanley, U. S. Army, commanding Fourth Army Corps, of operations July 27-September 8. headquarters Fourth Army Corps, Atlanta, Ga., September 15, 1864. I have the honor to report that upon the morning of the 27th of July General Howard, commanding Fourth Army Corps, turned the command over to me, and left the same morning to take command of the Army of the Tennessee. The corps was at this time occupying a line of works confronting the fortifications of Atlanta, extending ffortifying across the road and railroad, about one mile north of Lovejoy's Station. Arrangements were made at once for advancing upon the position-Newton's division forming the right of the line, Wood's the center, and Kimball's the left. General Howard, commanding the Army of the Tennessee, notified me that he woulh advance in concert with the Fourth Corps, and that he would notify me when ready to advance. This he did at 3.30 o'clock in the afternoon. The troops of this corps were immedi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Eleventh Corps at Chancellorsville. (search)
ld the enemy come. General Hooker's circular order to Slocum and Howard neither reached me, nor, to my knowledge, Colonel Meysenberg, my ads Letters sent book and in one of the two Letters received books of Howard's headquarters. The entry in Howard's book appears to have been maHoward's book appears to have been made in the latter part of June. In Hooker's book a notation in red ink reads, Copy furnished General Howard ; and the inference is that it wasGeneral Howard ; and the inference is that it was this copy that was entered in Howard's book in June.--editors. From some confused notion it was issued to Slocum and Howard, when Slocum was Howard's book in June.--editors. From some confused notion it was issued to Slocum and Howard, when Slocum was no longer within two miles of me, and had not been in command of my corps after Hooker's arrival at Chancellorsville. Slocum, naturally suppoHoward, when Slocum was no longer within two miles of me, and had not been in command of my corps after Hooker's arrival at Chancellorsville. Slocum, naturally supposing that I had a copy, would not think of forwarding a joint order to me after that, and certainly no such order came to me. But Generals Devs, consisting of Barlow's stanch brigade. Steinwehr and I, with Major Howard as guide, went far enough southward to see what was to be done w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Stonewall Jackson's last battle. (search)
Federal force found here and at Talley's, a mile farther west, was the Eleventh Corps, under General Howard. General Fitz Lee, with cavalry scouts, had advanced until he had view of the position of HoHoward's corps, and found them unsuspicious of attack. Reaching the Orange Plank road, General Jackson himself rode with Fitz Lee to reconnoiter the position of Howard, and then sent the Stonewall brHoward, and then sent the Stonewall brigade of Virginia troops, under Brigadier-General Paxton, to hold the point where the Germanna Plank road obliquely enters the Orange road. Leading the main column of his force farther on the Brock r] About a mile had been passed, when he halted and began the disposition of his forces to attack Howard. Rodes's division, at the head of the column, was thrown into line of battle, with Colston's fooague and Palmer, and all the rest, ready to bark loud and deep with half a chance? Alas! for Howard and his unformed lines, and his brigades with guns stacked, and officers at dinner or asleep und
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Hooker's comments on Chancellorsville. (search)
cellor, whose home at the time of the battle was at Dowdall's Tavern, where General Howard had his headquarters. On setting out, General Hooker suggested that we shoncellorsville, Va., May 2d, 1863, 9:30 A. M. Circular.Major-Generals Slocum and Howard: I am directed by the Major-General commanding to say that the disposition y. Van Alen, Brigadier-General and Aide-de-camp. [This is the dispatch which General Howard states he did not receive at the time. See p. 196. In the Official Records the word circular does not appear, and the address is Major-Generals Howard and Slocum.--editors.] to Generals Slocum and Howard, the latter commanding the EleventhHoward, the latter commanding the Eleventh Corps, which stood upon the extreme right, saying that I had good reason to believe that the enemy was moving to our right, and that they must be ready to meet an atas at 9:30 in the morning. In the course of two hours I got a dispatch from General Howard, saying that he could see a column of the enemy moving westward, and that h
o him and to Dr. Duncan, the staff surgeons, the officers and soldiers at headquarters of the army are indebted for all the medical aid they require. Major C. H. Howard, Senior Aid-de-Camp, is commended for his diligence in causing my orders to be executed; in bearing despatches by perilous and distant routes; and for affordingr special gallantry at Allatoona, where he was severely wounded. I recommend for promotion the following officers of my staff: For Brevet Colonel: Major C. H. Howard, Senior Aid-de-Camp, for gallant and meritorious conduct during the Atlanta and the Savannah campaigns. For Brevet Colonel: Major T. W. Osborne, Chief of Art next morning. The troops only marched as far as Nickajack, and went into camp to await the arrival of the wagons, detained at the river by the crossing of General Howard's troops. On the fifth, the corps marched to connect with the Fourth corps, near Kenesaw Mountain; but owing to its being on the flank, and having to take
tention to the comfort and interest of myself and staff, while acting in his capacity of Commandant of Headquarters. No department of this army has been better conducted on this campaign than the Medical. To Assistant-Surgeon D. L. Huntington, Acting Medical Director, is due great praise for his diligence and eminent success. To him and to Dr. Duncan, the staff surgeons, the officers and soldiers at headquarters of the army are indebted for all the medical aid they require. Major C. H. Howard, Senior Aid-de-Camp, is commended for his diligence in causing my orders to be executed; in bearing despatches by perilous and distant routes; and for affording me the sympathy and moral support of one who identifies himself completely with the interests of the service. Captain W. M. Beebe, Acting Aid-de-Camp, receives my thanks for his generous assistance, being ever anxious to undergo any risk or perform a gallant action. Captain F. W. Gilbreth, Aid-de-Camp, is always at the post o
eld with the wounded-General Hunter was in one of them; there were men with broken arms; faces with bandages stained with blood; bodies pierced; many were walking or limping to the rear; meanwhile shells were shrieking and breaking in the heated air. I was sorry, indeed, that those left of my men had to pass that ordeal. It was about 3 P. M. Away over toward the Warrenton Pike and by the Henry house there was still a fitful rattling of small arms and a continuous roar of heavy guns. Send Howard to the right to support Ricketts's battery. Captain J. B. Fry, of McDowell's staff, brought me the word and led the way to the right, well across Young's Branch to a hill not far from the Dogan house. In the little ravine north of this hill I formed my two brigade lines, the Second Vermont and Fourth Maine in the front, and the Third and Fifth Maine in the second line. When forming, I so stationed myself, mounted, that the men, marching by twos, should pass me. I closely observed them. M
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 12: General George B. McClellan and the organization of the army of the Potomac (search)
hing working parties for the construction of the fortifications about Washington. Here I was under General Sedgwick. No one of his command will forget his quiet, watchful discipline and his fatherly management. An unexpected visit on August 8th from McDowell escorting Prince Jerome Napoleon through our camps had a cheering feature for me. Just before the general with his cavalcade rode away he turned to me and spoke of the orders of McClellan which had dissolved my brigade. He said: Colonel Howard, that action is not final; you shall not suffer nor lose your brigade. The remark had its fruition on September 3, 1861, when I received my commission of brigadier general of volunteers. For several weeks thereafter I had, however, that unhappy experience of waiting for orders. Restless, talking with my adjutant, walking to and fro, reading the papers, conning over some books, and going over the regulations, or at orderly hours sitting in the anteroom of General Marcy, father-in-law a
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 24: the battle of Gettysburg begun (search)
ilar effect. Speaking of the same thing in another letter to a friend in February, 1877, Hall says: The impression has always been firmly fixed in my mind that the first suggestion that I ever heard about occupying Cemetery Hill was from General Howard. Once more, in a subsequent letter to me, Captain Hall used these words: I know to a certainty that nobody anticipated you in seeing the importance of Cemetery Hill, and immediately acting upon that conclusion. Major E. P. Pearson, of t the First Corps and at the same time occupy the enemy's attention, I ordered Schurz to push out a strong force from his front and seize a wooded height situated some distance north of Robinson's position; but the order had hardly left me when Major Howard brought me word that Early's division of Ewell's corps was at hand; in fact, the entire corps was coming in from the north and east. Reports from Schurz and Buford confirmed the alarming intelligence. Barlow against a shower of bullets mad
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