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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 249 5 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 196 10 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 104 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 84 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 81 3 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 60 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 48 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 40 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 38 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for O. O. Howard or search for O. O. Howard in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
ground. The ground falls off rapidly to almost a level surface, which extends about 500 yards, then, with another abrupt fall of a few feet, to another plain which extends some 200 yards, and then falls off abruptly to a wide ravine, which extends along the whole front of the city and discharges into Hazel run. The brigade of General Cobb had held the position behind the stone wall against the attack of the Federal Second corps, the three divisions of that corps, French's, Hancock's and Howard's, assaulting successively in the order named. In making his heroic defense, Cobb was supported by the artillery fire from the hill in his rear, and the infantry fire from the crest, delivered by the brigade of General Cooke. When Kershaw arrived, the attack of the Ninth corps was pending, and Sturgis' division of that corps was moving forward. Throwing his two regiments behind the wall, in the sunken road, the line of Confederates, four deep, delivered their fire with such deadly effect
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
zed in seven corps; the First under Reynolds, the Second under Couch, the Third under Sickles, the Fifth under Meade, the Sixth under Sedgwick, the Eleventh under Howard, the Twelfth under Slocum. The artillery included 370 guns, of all calibers. The cavalry force outnumbered General Lee's three to one. General Lee's army waally began the attack from the rear and flank before General Hooker's troops knew that they were being approached by a Confederate force. The Eleventh corps, General Howard, held the Federal right. Jackson's front line was led by Rodes, and so impetuous was the attack, and so complete the surprise, that the divisions of Howard wHoward were at once thrown into confusion and soon into rout. Rodes pressed on up the road and through the forest, followed by Colston and then by Hill, the great Jackson directing the advance. It was known that the enemy had a fortified line at the Talley house, and a second at Melzi Chancellor's house. Jackson's order was to carry th
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
ptly supported by the First corps of Meade's army, three divisions, under General Reynolds. General Hill deployed Heth's division on the right and left of the road, Pender's in support, and the battle became severe. Pushing his battle forward, Hill was checked at the wooded ridge known as Seminary hill, where the First corps with artillery was strongly posted. Putting his artillery in position Heth gallantly charged the heights with his four brigades, and made so strong a battle that General Howard, with part of the Eleventh corps, reinforced the line of the First. At this juncture Ewell's two divisions came in on Hill's left, and the latter ordered Pender forward to relieve Heth. Ewell's line was at right angles to that of Hill's, and both lines now swept onward with irresistible force. Pender's advance was with Thomas' Georgians on the left of the road, and Lane, Scales and Perrin (McGowan's brigade) on the right. The combined assault of Pender and Ewell's divisions swept th
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
and, Colonel Bratton reported, drove the enemy through their camp, and entirely beyond their wagon camp. The brigade became seriously engaged, and apparently had prospects of success, if supported, but the Federal divisions of Carl Schurz and O. O. Howard were close at hand, and Bratton was ordered to withdraw. The loss was heavy, 31 killed, 286 wounded and 39 missing. Colonel Kilpatrick, distinguished for gallantry and efficiency, was shot through the heart early in the engagement. Capt. Jamaptain Coker has written: General Geary's division was attacked by Jenkins' South Carolina brigade. No other troops fired a shot at Geary's men that night. When the order to retire was received, the brigade was withdrawn in good order. General Howard [marching to the support of Geary] made such progress that Jenkins' brigade was in danger of being cut off from the crossing over Lookout creek. With this understanding it is interesting to read General Geary's report: The enemy press
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 19: (search)
n. Finishing this work of destruction on the 29th, Howard and Thomas were ordered to march on the 30th acrossral Hood's only remaining railroad communications. Howard's destination was Jonesboro, 20 miles south of Atle last of Lee's corps did not arrive before 1 p. m. Howard had crossed Flint river with one corps in the afterforce of infantry. Before bedtime of the 30th, General Howard had two corps in position, the Fifteenth east aain advance of General Thomas, and interpreting General Howard's defensive attitude as indicative of his near omas' two corps were on the railroad in the rear of Howard and in supporting distance, and Schofield, with anoG. W. Smith. Hearing late at night of the 31st, of Howard's success in repelling Hardee, Sherman at once ordenk. The whole line was in one rank. From sunrise, Howard was threatening attack, with three corps in positio came up and took position between the railroad and Howard's left. Still later, at 4 o'clock, the Fourth corp
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
ely wounded. The last service of Bratton's brigade in 1864 was a hurried expedition by rail to Gordonsville, December 23d, to the assistance of General Lomax, confronting Sheridan, from which it returned without loss. At the beginning of 1865 General Bratton reported that he entered the campaign with a total of 2,016, had lost 176 killed, 1,094 wounded and 94 missing, total, 1,364, and had present at the date of his report, a total of 1,820. He particularly commended Colonels Hagood and Howard and their regiments, and the valuable services of Adjt.-Gen. J. B. Lyle. Elliott's brigade remained on the Petersburg lines with Johnson's division through the fall and winter, and the reports of General Johnson show that they had almost daily losses in killed and wounded. On the night of October 27th, the enemy carried a part of the picket line of the Holcombe legion, and Gen. W. H. Wallace, then in command of Elliott's brigade, immediately sent forward a force of 200 men from the legi
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 21: (search)
organized in two wings, the right, under Gen. O. O. Howard, composed of the corps of John A. Logan ndezvous near Robertsville and Coosawhatchie. Howard performed his part of the program, but on accoth, General McLaws, confronting the advance of Howard, from Beaufort, reported: I am endeavoring to But the Combahee was an impassable barrier to Howard, and he was compelled to move up its southwestBuford's bridge, Kilpatrick to Blackville, and Howard to cross the Salkehatchie and move for Midway corps was ordered to move toward Winnsboro and Howard to occupy Columbia, which one of his brigades ect tempest of wind was raging. His orders to Howard were, he says, to burn all arsenals and public that he was up nearly all night, and saw Generals Howard, Logan, Woods and others laboring to saverman was delayed by high water in the rivers. Howard's wing, having crossed the Catawba before the r's command, at Mount Elon. General Butler met Howard's advance at Chesterfield, and skirmished to i[1 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
w of Captain Copeland, of the Thirteenth regiment, and they have one child, Kate. Mrs. Nicholls had two brothers in the service, Erwin, of Holcombe's legion, and Howard, who enlisted in 1864 at the age of seventeen years, and was killed three months later, near Richmond. Colonel Jesse W. Norris Colonel Jesse W. Norris was bo Anderson, and on the next day returned to ascertain the whereabouts of a young Federal officer, John A. McQueen, of the Fifteenth Illinois cavalry, and of Gen. O. O. Howard's staff, who had preserved from destruction Dr. Reynold's residence, where Dr. Porter's family was staying. He found Lieutenant McQueen at Camden, and took ginning has grown to the present successful Porter military academy. In 1879, through the influence of his friend, Lieutenant McQueen, with Generals Sherman and Howard, the United States government, by act of Congress, leased to the board of trustees of the academy the old arsenal grounds, where he had begun his ministry in 1855