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Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 128 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 2 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 1 1 Browse Search
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d the solemn words, I heard a voice saying unto me, Write, Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth: yea, saith the Spirit, that they rest from their labors; and their works do follow them. As the body, in the last beam of fading day, was lowered into the grave, the grand old song of Luther, Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott, arose; and a cross and wreath of rarest flowers, prepared by the request of Mrs. Julia Hastings, sister of the deceased in California, was dropped by Miss Maud Howe upon the casket, amidst the statuesque silence of the surrounding multitude, broken only by the reverberation of the tolling of the distant bells. God rest his gallant spirit! give him peace, And crown his brows with amaranth, and set The saintly palm-branch in his strong right hand. Amid the conquering armies of the skies Give him high place forever! let him walk O'er meads of better asphodel; and be Where dwell the single-hearted and the wise,--Men like himself, severely, simply g
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eleventh: his death, and public honors to his memory. (search)
vices began. After Chaplain Sunderland had recited the Lord's Prayer, a choir of forty gentlemen from the Apollo Club sang that inimitable ode of Horace, Integer vitoe. While this solemn music was rising, two ladies, the only mourners of their sex within the enclosure, stepped forward and placed upon the coffin, already laden with floral tributes of rarest beauty, an exquisite wreath, and a cross. A request was received from Mrs. Hastings, Mr. Sumner's sister in San Francisco, asking Miss Maud Howe, daughter of Dr. S. G. Howe, to have prepared for her a wreath and cross, the description of which was fully given, which she wished to have placed on the Senator's coffin previously to burial. The order was tenderly executed at the grave in Mount Auburn. Rev. Henry W. Foote pronounced the words, I heard a voice from Heaven saying unto me, Write:— From henceforth blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, for so saith the Spirit. They have rested from their labors, and their works d
vices began. After Chaplain Sunderland had recited the Lord's Prayer, a choir of forty gentlemen from the Apollo Club sang that inimitable ode of Horace, Integer vitoe. While this solemn music was rising, two ladies, the only mourners of their sex within the enclosure, stepped forward and placed upon the coffin, already laden with floral tributes of rarest beauty, an exquisite wreath, and a cross. A request was received from Mrs. Hastings, Mr. Sumner's sister in San Francisco, asking Miss Maud Howe, daughter of Dr. S. G. Howe, to have prepared for her a wreath and cross, the description of which was fully given, which she wished to have placed on the Senator's coffin previously to burial. The order was tenderly executed at the grave in Mount Auburn. Rev. Henry W. Foote pronounced the words, I heard a voice from Heaven saying unto me, Write:— From henceforth blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, for so saith the Spirit. They have rested from their labors, and their works d
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
t off very successfully, and I was much applauded, as were most of the others. Supper afterwards at Mrs. Richard Hunt's, where I had to appear in plain clothes, having been unable to accomplish evening dress after the play. Dear Flossy went with me. Another performance of that summer is not noted in the Journal; an impromptu rendering of Horatius at the bridge, in the green parlor at Oak Glen, with the following cast:-- HoratiusF. Marion Crawford. Spurius LartiusJ. W. H. HerminiusMaud Howe. The green parlor was an oval grass plot, thickly screened by tall cedars. Laura recited the ballad, keeping her voice as she could while the heroes waged desperate combat, but breaking down entirely when Horatius plunged headlong in the tide, and swam with magnificent action across — the greensward! September 18. Preached in Tiverton to-day. Text: The fashion of this world passeth away. Subject: Fashion, an intense but transient power; in contradistinction, the eternal things o
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
and his wife joining forces with her at 241 Beacon Street. In Harry's college days, mother and son had made much music together; now the old music books were unearthed, and the house resounded with the melodies of Rossini and Handel. It was a gay household, with Crawford living in the reception room on the ground floor; play was the order of the evening, as work was of the day. The new inmates brought new friends to the circle, men of science, the colleagues of her beloved Bunko, now Professor Howe of the Institute of Technology, Italians, and other Europeans introduced by Crawford. There was need of these new friends, for old ones were growing fewer. Side by side in the Journal with the mention of this one or that comes more and more frequently the record of the passing of some dear companion on life's journey. Those who were left of the great band that made New England glorious in the nineteenth century held closely to each other, and the bond between them had a touching signi
-52, 80, 100, 106, 109-11, 143, 164, 186, 189-91, 211-14, 237, 258, 271, 282, 308-10, 320, 336, 340, 342, 346, 359, 369, 378, 382, 393, 401, 403. Letters of, I, 31, 67, 71, 72, 79-82, 84-93, 107-33, 137, 142, 148, 149, 155-62, 164-72, 184, 196, 303; II, 58, 59, 63-70, 73, 78, 81-96, 98, 111-14, 119, 122-25, 132, 138, 155-58, 193, 195-200, 202, 203, 206, 208-10, 217, 218, 220, 221, 223, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 236, 267, 277, 285, 298-300, 391-93, 396-98. Howe, Laura E., see Richards. Howe, Maud, see Elliott. Howe, S. G., I, 72-83, 85, 86, 88-90, 92-95, 97, 101-06, 110, 111, 113-16, 118, 119, 121-24, 126-28, 130, 131, 133, 138, 139 141, 146-55, 161, 165, 167-70, 173, 177, 178, 181, 184-86, 195, 203, 206, 208, 217, 220, 222, 227, 231, 243, 245, 246, 248-251, 253, 255, 258, 261-65, 267, 273, 275, 278-80, 283, 287, 288, 292, 296-98, 306, 308, 315, 317, 321-25, 334-40, 343, 345, 350, 353-58, 362, 364, 372, 381; II, 3, 6, 23, 43-45, 63, 74, 77, 118, 120, 127, 134, 141, 145, 146, 164
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 4: home life: my father (search)
yself like a young damsel of olden time, shut up within an enchanted castle. And I must say that my dear father, with all his noble generosity and overweening affection, sometimes appeared to me as my jailer. My brother's return from Europe and subsequent marriage opened the door a little for me. It was through his intervention that Mr. Longfellow first visited us, to become a valued and lasting friend. Through him in turn we became acquainted with Professor Felton, Charles Sumner, and Dr. Howe. My brother was very fond of music, of which he had heard the best in Paris and in Germany. He often arranged musical parties at our house, at which trios of Beethoven, Mozart, and Schubert were given. His wit, social talent, and literary taste opened a new world to me, and enabled me to share some of the best results of his long residence in Europe. My father's jealous care of us was by no means the result of a disposition tending to social exclusiveness. It proceeded, on the contra
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 10: a chapter about myself (search)
Chapter 10: a chapter about myself If I may sum up in one term the leading bent of my life, I will simply call myself a student. Dr. Howe used to say of me: Mrs. Howe is not a great reader, but she always studies. Albeit my intellectual pursuits have always been such as to task my mind, I cannot boast that I have acquireMrs. Howe is not a great reader, but she always studies. Albeit my intellectual pursuits have always been such as to task my mind, I cannot boast that I have acquired much in the way of technical erudition. I have only drawn from history and philosophy some understanding of human life, some lessons in the value of thought for thought's sake, and, above all, a sense of the dignity of character above every other dignity. Goethe chose well for his motto the words:— Die Zeit ist mein Vormachtipline and instruction which I, never having received, was quite unable to give them. During the first years of my residence at the Institution for the Blind, Dr. Howe delighted in inviting his friends to weekly dinners, which cost me many unhappy hours. My want of training and of forethought often caused me to forget some ver
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 11: anti-slavery attitude: literary work: trip to Cuba (search)
which visited Charles Sumner never fell upon Dr. Howe. This may have been because the active life th her Mr. Eames entered the room, and said, Mrs. Howe, my wife has always had a menagerie here in e had planned a journey in South America, and Dr. Howe had promised to accompany him. The sudden faiHavana, he was able to go about somewhat with Dr. Howe. He had, however, a longer voyage before himou the Mrs. Hampton? She asked, Are you the Mrs. Howe? We became friends at once. The Hamptons wtanzas, where we passed a few pleasant days. Dr. Howe was very helpful to the beautiful invalid. Smean to fight for it, said Wade Hampton. But Dr. Howe afterwards said to me: They cannot be in earn now spoken of that I first saw Edwin Booth. Dr. Howe and I betook ourselves to the Boston Theatre ecame one of his victims. I say this because Dr. Howe made the purchase without much deliberation. ook which ran much out of its proper course. Dr. Howe converted it into a most charming outof-door [4 more...]
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 12: the Church of the Disciples: in war time (search)
near at hand. Parker was soon made aware of Dr. Howe's views, but no estrangement ensued between t. It may have been a year or more later that Dr. Howe said to me: Do you remember that man of whom body of men on the arsenal at Harper's Ferry. Dr. Howe presently came in, and I told him what I had man Clarke, Governor Andrew, and my husband. Dr. Howe had already passed beyond the age of militaryerests of the newly freed slaves. Although Dr. Howe had won his spurs many years before this time armed men seated on the ground near a fire. Dr. Howe explained to me that these were the pickets dswered back, Good for you! Mr. Clarke said, Mrs. Howe, why do you not write some good words for tof its success, one of my good friends said, Mrs. Howe ought to die now, for she has done the best seated ourselves in the car, he said to me, Mrs. Howe, I will sit beside you, but you must not expctor gave me the nickname of Madame Comment (Mrs. Howe), and I told him that he was the most perfec[7 more...]
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