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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 167 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 145 11 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 129 7 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 36 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 31 1 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 20 2 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 18 6 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 17 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 13 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 11 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career.. You can also browse the collection for Samuel G. Howe or search for Samuel G. Howe in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Esq. his regard for the Law School. his Admission to the bar. Sumner's Reports. Compliment of Baron Parke. lectures to the Dane Law School. Edits Andrew Dunlap's Admiralty practice. his Promise as a Lawyer. his acquaintance with Dr. S. G. Howe. It is by dint of steady labor; it is by giving enough of application to the work, and having enough of time for the doing of it; it is by regular painstaking and the plying of constant assiduties,--it is by these, and not by any process dance, and ready in the law. I remember that on his return from Europe he seemed proud to relate that Lord Brougham had expressed to him the opinion that Mr. Justice Story was the greatest judge in the world. Mr. Sumner's acquaintance with Dr. S. G. Howe--a true and intimate friend — commenced, it is said, at the great Broad-street riot in 1837. The rioters had got possession of some barrels of whiskey; when Dr. Howe, seeing a stalwart young man endeavoring with an axe to knock in the head of
love thee, But never more be officer of mine. In this forcible letter, the writer uses these memorable words indicating the eternal source of rectitude as the guide for the settlement of the great political question: Aloft on the throne of God, and not below in the footprints of a trampling multitude of men, are to be found the sacred rules of right, which no majorities can displace or overturn. In a speech against the Mexican War at a public meeting in November following, when Dr. Samuel G. Howe was brought forward as a Congressional candidate in opposition to Mr. Winthrop, Mr. Sumner said, It is with the Whigs that I have heretofore acted, and may hereafter act; always confessing a loyalty to principles higher than any party ties. On this solid platform of conscience and of duty, dealing his blows against the peculiar institution, Mr. Sumner proudly stood. He clearly saw and openly rebuked the subservience of his party to the slaveocracy of the South; and though not then
yed to menace the Black Republic of Hayti. He denounced Baez as a usurper who would sell his country, and said that the treaty was a violation of the Constitution of the United States, as well as of that of San Domingo. On the ensuing day Mr. Howe replied to Mr. Sumner, defending Baez; and he insinuated, in conclusion, that Mr. Sumner, Judaslike, was trying to stab the Republican party in the back. Replying to Mr. Howe, Carl Schurz in a very brilliant speech said, Mr. Sumner had plunged ution of the United States, as well as of that of San Domingo. On the ensuing day Mr. Howe replied to Mr. Sumner, defending Baez; and he insinuated, in conclusion, that Mr. Sumner, Judaslike, was trying to stab the Republican party in the back. Replying to Mr. Howe, Carl Schurz in a very brilliant speech said, Mr. Sumner had plunged his dagger not into the Republican party, but into Caesarism; and we cannot forget that the world has agreed to pronounce Brutus the noblest Roman of them all.
he picture known as The Miracle of the slave, with the injunction that the trustees shall do with them what they think best, disposing of all for the benefit of the Museum. 5. I bequeath to my friends of many years, Henry W. Longfellow and Samuel G. Howe, my bronzes, to be divided between them; also to Henry W. Longfellow the Psyche and the bust of the young Augustus, in marble; to my friend Joshua B. Smith the picture known as The Miracle of the slave; and to the city of Boston, for the Art Museum, the bust of myself by Crawford, taken during my visit to Rome in 1839. 6. I bequeath to the daughters of Henry W. Longfellow $2000; also to the daughters of Samuel G. Howe $2000; and to the daughters of James T. Furness of Philadelphia $2000; which I ask them to accept in token of my gratitude for the friendship their parents have shown me. 7. I bequeath to Hannah Richmond Jacobs, only surviving sister of my mother, an annuity of $500, to be paid by my executor for the remainder of