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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 178 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 151 3 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 65 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 44 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 41 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 3 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 24 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 15 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 14 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 27, 1862., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Benjamin Huger or search for Benjamin Huger in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
ere under the command of Brigadier-General H. A. Wise, the Department commander being Major-General Benjamin Huger, of South Carolina, whose Headquarters were at Norfolk. Owing to the illness of .Gennder Major G. H. Hill. And four hundred and fifty men, under Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson. Benjamin Huger. several batteries had been erected on prominent points of the shores of Roanoke, which one of the most gallant and brilliant actions of the War, and laid the blame, if any existed, on Huger and Benjamin, especially on the latter, who, it was said, had positively refused to put the Islao capture or pass Roanoke Island in Twenty-four hours. Wise also asked for re-enforcements from Huger's fifteen thousand men, lying idle around Norfolk. He was answered by a peremptory order, when ators was too powerful to allow much complaint from the outraged people. in his Report to General Huger, Wise said Roanoke Island was the key to all the defenses of Norfolk. It unlocked two sound
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 14: movements of the Army of the Potomac.--the Monitor and Merrimack. (search)
f McClellan's great army, there were only about five thousand Confederate soldiers behind incomplete earth-works. General McClellan estimated Magruder's force at from fifteen thousand to twenty thousand men, while the eight thousand troops under Huger at Norfolk, he supposed to be fifteen thousand in number. When General McClellan arrived at Fortress Monroe, he found fifty-eight thousand men and one hundred cannon of his army there. Large numbers of troops were continually arriving. Perceh rapidly to the head of the Peninsula. Johnston's desire was to concentrate all his forces around Richmond, and give the National troops a decisive battle there. He was overruled; and it was determined to hold the Peninsula, if possible, until Huger might dismantle the fortifications at Norfolk, destroy the naval establishment there, and evacuate the seaboard. Battle-fields of the South, by an English Combatant, page 169. Mr. Swinton says (Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, page 103) t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
ktown, when President Lincoln and Secretaries Chase and Stanton visited Fortress Monroe, that his suggestions were favorably considered. He then renewed his recommendations; and when, on the 8th, May, 1862. he received positive information that Huger (who, with Burnside in his rear and McClellan on his flank, saw that his position was untenable) was preparing to evacuate that post, orders were given for an immediate attempt to seize Sewell's Point, and march on Norfolk. Arrangements were madty-nine Wool's Landing-place at Ocean view. mounted cannon, but no troops. Onward they marched, and just before reaching the city they were met by a flag of truce, heralding the approach of the Mayor with a proposition to surrender the town. Huger had been instructed not to attempt to hold the city against any demonstration of National troops; and when he was informed that Wool had landed at Ocean View, he turned over Norfolk to the keeping of Mayor Lamb, and with his troops fled towards R
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
arters of its commander at Cool Arbor. When Huger fled from Norfolk, and the Merrimack was blownrted by General Roger A. Pryor, with a part of Huger's division, which did not get up in time to joLee, Baldwin, Jackson, A. P. Hill, D. H. Hill, Huger, Longstreet, Branch, Wise, Anderson, Whiting, his movement would leave only the divisions of Huger and Magruder between McClellan's left, at Fair Lee was perplexed by these circumstances, for Huger and Magruder all that day reported the Nationaotion in pursuit. June 29, 1862. Magruder and Huger were ordered to push along the Williamsburg ansing the Nationals to be advancing, he sent to Huger for aid. Two brigades were forwarded, but these fugitive army; the other, under Magruder and Huger, pushed along the Charles City road to the rig of the Nationals, when Armistead's brigade of Huger's division was to advance with a shout and caro a better position. Meanwhile Magruder and Huger had made a furious attack on Porter at the lef[2 more...]