Your search returned 204 results in 74 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 8: the Southern influence---Whitman (search)
hed by his songs. He talks of labor as one who had never really labored; his Drum Taps proceed from one who has never personally responded to the tap of the drum. He has something of the turgid wealth, the rather self-conscious amplitude, of Victor Hugo, and much of his broad, vague, indolent desire for the welfare of the whole human race; but he has none of Hugo's structural power, his dramatic or at least melodramatic instinct, and his occasionally terse and brilliant condensation. He somHugo's structural power, his dramatic or at least melodramatic instinct, and his occasionally terse and brilliant condensation. He sometimes suggests a young man of rather ideal stamp who used to invite Mr. Emerson and others to give readings at his room in Boston, many years ago. He was an ardent disciple of Fourier, and had painted on his door in large golden letters the motto of Fourier, Universal Unity, with beams of starlight diverging from it in all directions. Below this was the motto, hung separately and painted in neat black and white, Please wipe your feet. Unfortunately, Whitman himself, with all his genius, was n
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
, 117. Historians, New England, 116-119. History of the Jews, 241. History of the United States, Bancroft's, 143. Hoffman, Charles Fenno, 105. Holland, J. G., 124. Holmes, Oliver Wendell, 10, 133, 135, 137, 143, 146, 152-160, 161, 162-164, 197, 242, 264. Hooper, Mrs., 264. Hopkinson, Francis, 54, 55. House of the seven Gables, Hawthorne's, 185. Howe, Mrs., Julia Ward, 264. Howells, W. D., 3, 236, 248-252. Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain's, 248. Hudibras, Butler's, 41. Hugo, Victor, 233. Hunt, Leigh, 66. Hymns of the marshes, Lanier's, 225. Hymn to the night, Longfellow's, 142. Hyperion, Keats's, 225. HIyperion, Longfellow's, 140, 141. I fill this Cup, Pinkney's, 216. In a summer evening, Harriet Prescott Spofford's, 264. Indian Burying-ground, Freneau's, 36. Ingraham, Joseph Holt, 129. Innocents abroad, Mark Twain's, 248. Irving, Washington, 83-92, 94, 119, 140, 142, 161, 240. I sing the body Electric, Whitman's, 230. I slept and drea
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 13: Whittier (search)
s du Cygne and the marching-song of The Kansas Emigrants: We cross the prairies as of old The pilgrims crossed the sea, To make the West, as they the East, The homestead of the free! The ballad of Barbara Frietchie still has power to thrill its readers, and the terrible Ichabod, occasioned by Webster's willingness to make terms with the abhorred evil of slavery, has lost little or none of its original force. It is a fearful thing, says Swinburne, paraphrasing the Scriptures in praise of Victor Hugo, for a malefactor to fall into the hands of an ever-living poet. And nowhere in the Chatiments of the French poet is there to be found a greater finality of condemnation than that with which Whittier stamped the subject of this truly great poem. It will have been observed that many of the pieces already mentioned belong to the class of occasional or personal compositions. This class constitutes a large fraction of the total of Whittier's work. The long list of his friendly tributes
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
s Egbert Craddock. Cable was one of the discoveries of Edward King during his tour of the South for Scribner's monthly in 1872. It was in New Orleans that he found him working as a humble clerk by day, and by night dreaming over a collection of reading matter as foreign to his work-day world as that which once had engaged another dreaming clerk, Charles Lamb. Among his enthusiasms were the old Spanish and French archives of the city; old relations of the priest-explorers; French novels— Hugo, Merimee, About; English literature and American— Thackeray, Dickens, Poe, Irving. The composite of all this, plus a unique and evanescent quality which we call personality, was already finding form in sketches and stories which Cable was writing for himself and for the New Orleans papers. Some of his stories he showed to King, who advised him to send them to Scribner's. One of these, 'Sieur George, was published the following year; others came at intervals. The young artist was not to be
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
cross, 283 Hooper, Johnson J., 153 Hoosiers, the, 364 Hoosier schoolmaster, the, 362, 383 Horace, 234, 240 Houghton, Lord, 268 House of the seven Gables, the, 21, 28 Howard, John, 45 Howe, Julia Ward, 285 Howells, W. D., 229, 237, 284, 351 n., 377, 383 Howe's Masquerade, 25 How old Brown took Harper's Ferry, 276, 279 How the Cumberland went down, 282 How to make books, 405 Huckleberries gathered from New England Hills, 373, 388 Huckleberry Finn, 405 Hugo, Victor, 51, 384 Human wheel, its Spokes and Felloes, the, 229 Humble-Bee, The, 241 Humble romance, a, 390 Humboldt, Alexander von, 130 Hume, David, 399 Hume, Martin, 129 Hunter, General, 155 Hutchinson, Thomas, 104, 106, 113 Hyacinth, the, 174 Hymns to the gods, 290 Hyperion, 34 Ichabod, 51 Iduna and other stories, 388 Ike and his friends, 155 Iliad, 2 Illinois monthly magazine, the, 163 In a cellar, 373 In an Atelier, 242 Independent, the, 280 Indepen
like his own immediate master, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Whitman is a mystic. He cannot argue the ultimate questions; he asserts them. Instead of marshaling and sifting the proofs for immortality, he chants I know I am deathless. Like Emerson again, Whitman shares that peculiarly American type of mysticism known as Transcendentalism, but he came at the end of this movement instead of at the beginning of it. In his Romanticism, likewise, he is an end of an era figure. His affiliations with Victor Hugo are significant; and a volume of Scott's poems which he owned at the age of sixteen became his inexhaustible mine and treasury for more than sixty years. Finally, and quite as uncompromisingly as Emerson, Thoreau, and Poe, Whitman is an individualist. He represents the assertive, Jacksonian period of our national existence. In a thousand similes he makes a declaration of independence for the separate person, the single man of Emerson's Phi Beta Kappa address. I wear my hat as I please
on of mature literary art and impressive general ideas is comparatively rare. There are single poems of Whittier, Lowell, and Whitman which meet every test of effective political and social verse, but the main body of poetry, both sectional and national, written during the thirty years ending with 1865 lacks breadth, power, imaginative daring. The continental spaciousness and energy which foreign critics thought they discovered in Whitman is not characteristic of our poetry as a whole. Victor Hugo and Shelley and Swinburne have written far more magnificent republican poetry than ours. The passion for freedom has been very real upon this side of the Atlantic; it pulsed in the local loyalty of the men who sang Dixie as well as in their antagonists who chanted John Brown's body and The battle Hymn of the Republic; but this passion has not yet lifted and ennobled any notable mass of American verse. Even the sentiment of union was more adequately voiced in editorials and sermons and o
novation. Imagism itself is hardly as novel as its contemporary advocates appear to maintain, and free verse goes back far in our English speech and song. But the new generation believes that it has made a discovery in reverting to sensations rather than thought, to the naive reproduction of retinal and muscular impressions, as if this were the end of the matter. The self-conscious, self-defending side of the new poetic impulse may soon pass, as it did in the case of Wordsworth and of Victor Hugo. Whatever happens, we have already had fresh and exquisite revelations of natural beauty, and, in volumes like North of Boston and A Spoon River Anthology, judgments of life that run very deep. American fiction seems just now, on the contrary, to be marking time and not to be getting noticeably forward. Few names unknown ten years ago have won wide recognition in the domain of the novel. The short story has made little technical advance since the first successes of 0. Henry, though
te what is called the abolition cause. Mark this! If you will break loose from these associates, if you will close your mouth on the slave question, you may reckon on our undivided support on Irish matters. Whenever your country's claims come up, you shall be sure of fifty votes on your side. No, said O'Connell, let God care for Ireland; I will never shut my mouth on the slave question to save her! (Wendell Phillips, speech at the National A. S. Bazaar, Dec. 27, 1851. Lib. 22: 2.) Victor Hugo, Letter to Mrs. Chapman, Paris, July 6, 1851: Slavery in such a country! Can there be an incongruity more monstrous? Barbarism installed in the very heart of a country which is itself the affirmation of civilization; liberty wearing a chain; blasphemy echoing from the altar; the collar of the negro chained to the pedestal of Washington! . . . What! when slavery is departing from Turkey, shall it rest in America? What! Drive it from the hearth of Omar, and adopt it at the hearth of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
which Gayarre had so dramatically rendered. The play is conceived somewhat in the spirit of Victor Hugo; it is in verse, in five acts, and is dedicated to the martyrs of 1769. Very little is known, singing his verses at the top of his voice. His poetry was well received in France, notably by Hugo; it was said that Beranger and Deschamps learned some of his lines by heart. He published two vo de la Louisiane, produced in 1841 Les Imperiales, a volume of homage to Napoleon in the style of Hugo. Felix de Courmont began in 1866 a poetical daily, in which he printed his own mediocre verse, cng volume of poems by Boise, Dalcour, Liotau, Valcour, Thierry, and others, inspired evidently by Hugo and Beranger, but striking at times a note of independence and jocularity. The following, from T, he is now more or less reposing on his laurels, and these are not few. Successful translator of Hugo's Les Miserables, Ibsen's Doll's House, and Hood's The song of the shirt, he was also tireless as
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8