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al McCausland's command was unfounded. He has returned to Romney, having accomplished what he was sent for. He was ordered to obtain one hundred thousand dollars in gold as a ransom for Chambersburg, (in retaliation for the property destroyed by Hunter in the Valley during his raid), or in default of that to burn the town. The gold was not paid, and the town was fired--two hundred and fifty-four houses being destroyed. Hunter's raid will cost the Yankee nation more towns than this one. Thererdered to obtain one hundred thousand dollars in gold as a ransom for Chambersburg, (in retaliation for the property destroyed by Hunter in the Valley during his raid), or in default of that to burn the town. The gold was not paid, and the town was fired--two hundred and fifty-four houses being destroyed. Hunter's raid will cost the Yankee nation more towns than this one. There have been about twenty towns burnt in the Confederacy, and it takes nineteen more to get us even with the Yankees.
onsiderable loss. Both armies are engaged in strengthening their defensive works. A few days since fifty rebel deserters attempted to come into our lines in a body, but our troops, not understanding their intentions, fired on them, and twenty-nine of the number were killed or wounded. Miscellaneous. A dispatch from Fort Smith, Arkansas, says that the rebels, under Generals Cooper, Gaines and Standwaite, were defeated near that place on the 31st ultimo. They were in full retreat, pursued by the Union forces. Lincoln has revoked General Hunter's order banishing rebel sympathizers from Central Maryland. General Hooker has not been assigned to any command yet. He will visit New York. Admiral Dahlgren has published a letter attempting to prove that his son, Ulric, did not write the orders found on his person. The so-called Governor Hahn, of Louisiana, has arrived in Washington. The last quotation of gold in New York is two hundred and fifty-seven.
erceive what advantage he has gained by approaching it now from the south side if he fails in his purpose of cutting the Confederate communications. That the combination on which he relied for that purpose has signally failed cannot be doubted. Hunter may have done damage to the western lines, but he has suffered dearly for his interference, and the injury was speedily repaired. The cavalry, in which the Federal seem to have established a decided preponderance, have failed to effect a perde to march a whole corps and a division to their assistance, with results yet unknown to us. Sheridan, from whom a good deal was expected, has not turned out to be a Zeidlitz, a Murat, or even a Paget. He failed in a very feeble effort to reach Hunter, and he has since lost, we are told, one thousand men in a scamper across the Peninsula, south of Richmond, with the view of getting his corps across the James river to aid the cavalry force belonging to Grant's army. The next great Federal army
Hunter. We published from the Central Presbyterian in the Dispatch of yesterday the narration of the murder of David S. Creigh, of Greenbrier, by order of General Hunter, of the Yankee army. MrGeneral Hunter, of the Yankee army. Mr. Creigh was one of the most estimable citizens of Greenbrier, and was put to death for defending himself and family against the outrages of a Yankee soldier who had first attempted to take his life. This act of the "fiend" Hunter will not be forgotten, and will yet "return to plague" him. There were several other murders perpetrated by him in his invasion of Virginia. They will be remembered, aely ever lead his army in a retreat, as he did in his disgraceful night from Lynchburg. General Hunter, it is said, was not born in Virginia, but in the District — either in Georgetown or Washington. He is said to be the son of the late General Hunter, of the United States army, who was related to some of the Virginia Hunters. It is disgraceful enough that any Virginia blood, however small
an army of sixty or eighty thousand men to move down in light marching order so rapidly as to be in Maryland again in advance of any reliable warning of their numbers or their near approach. In this view of the subject, we care less to know what Hunter, Crook and Averill are doing than what the Administration is about at Washington. When we were satisfied that General Joe Johnston had been removed from the command of the rebel army of Georgia and recalled to Richmond, we guessed that it waur years a chief magistrate who has given such signal proofs of his incompetency, in the first place, and whose plans for securing a re-election are likely, in the second place, to lead to such disastrous consequences. Miscellaneous. General Hunter has been superceded in the command of the Army of the Upper Potomac by General Sheridan. Of thirty-two hundred men comprising McCook's command, only some six hundred succeeded in returning to Sherman's lines. The Union convention wh
indeed for John Bull! And no sooner has Lord Ellenborough, in the name of the new Government, disapproved of this hitherto unexampled measure, than up rise The Times and a host British papers to defend this wholesale robbery, and break a lance for the right of John Bull to confiscate everything he likes. But then, John is an exceptional being, and what is virtue in him, according to The Times, would be infamy in others. " The only difference in the conduct of the British in India and that of the Yankees in the South is that the British officers tried to stop the outrages, whilst the Yankee officers are the leaders in robbery, devastation and murder. Contrast the conduct of Sir Colin Campbell and General Hunter! As to confiscation, what was Lord Canning to Lincoln?--Yet here is the Tribune now urging on and applauding the same crimes against Christian humanity in the South which it execrated as the climax of human abominations when practiced upon cruel barbarians in India!
at truth--"it was all my fault." Apologies for failure form but a very poor substitute for success, and of all people in the world the Yankees are the least willing to accept such apologies in payment for services due. "Resolutions do not build railroads," and excuses do not take cities. It would be more honorable in Grant to release his subordinates and take the blame on himself. His case is that of many a much greater man than himself. He did not take Petersburg for the very same reason that Pompey did not beat Cæsar. He did not defeat Lee, because Lee defeated him. Let him imitate the magnanimity of Beau Brummell's valet, who, far from claiming infallibility for his master, directed the attention of a visitor to a bushel or two of rumpled cravats lying on the floor, and exclaimed, with true grandeur of soul, "these are our failures." The Wilderness, Spotsylvania Courthouse, Cold Harbor, Sheridan's raid, Kantz's raid, Hunter's campaign, are Grant's failures, and let him say so.