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The Daily Dispatch: June 6, 1864., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 31, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
application, received for answer the following letter: Savannah, July 17, 1864 I have received your note of this day. In reply, I have to inform you that I am instructed by the honorable Secretary of the Navy as follows, viz.: When the services of Assistant-Surgeon Pierson, United States Navy, are no longer needed with the wounded officers and men in the hospital, he will be turned over to the proper military authorities to be treated as other prisoners-of-war. Respectfully, W. W. Hunter, Flag-Officer, etc. In accordance with the above edict, this gentleman was sent to Macon Prison. His daily ration consisted of one pint of unbolted corn-meal, a tablespoonful of rice, a little miserable and sometimes maggoty bacon (called, in derision, soap-grease) a very little salt, and a moderate supply of poor molasses. It was said at that time that the same ration was served out to Confederate soldiers; if that was so, they were in a bad strait, and could not help it. But ther
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
Surgeon, G. H. Marvin; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, R. F. Goodman; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistants,. C. C. Davis and David Newell; Acting-Third-Assistants, H. D. Heiser, A. Stewart and A. Moore. *Governor Buckingham--Third-rate. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, John Macdearmid; Acting-Ensigns, C. H. Sawyer, L. W. Smith, D. M. Gaskins and L. P. Cassan; Acting-Assistant-Surgeon, W. S. Parker; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, G. B. Tripp; Acting-Master's Mates, J. W. Gardner, F. H. Poole and W. W. Hunter; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, F. E. Porter; Acting-Second Assistant, Eugene Mack; Acting-Third-Assistants, Thos. Foley, Owen Kaney, James Fitzpatrick and Chas. Ward. *Aries--Third-rate. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, F. S. Wells; Acting-Ensigns, G. F. Morse, J. A. Brennan and Seth Hand; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, A. C. Fowler; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, C. A. Downes; Acting-Master's Mates, D. McCool and F. A. Haskell; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Simeon Smith; Acting-Thir
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
skirmish by a detachment of the Fifty-seventh Georgia under Captains Tucker and Turner, and a section of Maxwell's battery under Lieutenant Richardson. The Confederate naval forces afloat at Savannah during 1864 were under the command of Capt. W. W. Hunter, a native of Philadelphia, who had espoused the cause of the South, and had been on duty on the Texas coast and in Virginia. Commodore Tattnall remained at the head of the naval forces. During the year the Savannah; an armored ship, was acks on Fort McAllister, Ossabaw sound was usually guarded alone by the Federal gunboat Waterwitch, a famous side-wheel steamer which had taken part in the Paraguay war of 1855, and fought against Commodore Hollins in the Mississippi passes. Captain Hunter detailed 7 boats, 5 officers and 11 7 men to attempt the capture of this vessel, under Lieut. Thomas P. Pelot, on May 31st. They could not find the Waterwitch that night, but hearing the next day of her presence in Little Ogeechee river, the
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
cessary to choose between the safety of his army and that of the city of Savannah, to sacrifice the latter. One of the precautions taken by Hardee to prevent Sherman from cutting off his retreat into South Carolina was the sending of Flag-Officer W. W. Hunter up the Savannah river to destroy the Charleston and Savannah railroad bridge. Taking his flagship Sampson, the gunboat Macon and a small transport steamer laden with supplies, Hunter successfully accomplished his mission and then retuHunter successfully accomplished his mission and then returned to Savannah. As he approached the city, however, he found the Federal batteries in position, and after a gallant attempt to pass, in which the transport was disabled and captured, he was compelled to take his two small wooden gunboats up the river. Taking advantage of unusually high water, he was enabled to pass the obstructions and reach Augusta, where he and the most of his command were finally surrendered under General Johnston's capitulation. To open up communications with the Fede
n Harrison H. Cocke (reserved list), from the 23d of April, 1861. Commander Wm. Green (reserved list), from the 6th of May, 1861. Commander Murray Mason, from the 16th of April, 1861. Commander R. F. Pinkiney, from the 23d of April, 1861. Commander Fred. Chatard, from the 24th of April, 1861. Commander James L. Henderson, from the 18th of April, 1861. Commander Joseph Myers, from the 23d of April, 1861. Commander Wm. C. Whittle, from the 20th of April, 1861. Commander W. W. Hunter, from the 20th of April, 1861. Commander R. D. Thorburn, from the 22d of April, 1861. Commander Chas. H. McBlair, from the 22d of April, 1861. Commander George Minor, from the 22d of April, 1861. Lieutenant Joel S. Kennard, from the 23d of April, 1861. Lieutenant Beverley Kennon, from the 23d of April, 1861. Lieutenant R. L. Tilghman, from the 23d of April, 1861. Lieutenant C. Ap. R. Jones, from the 17th of April, 1861. Lieutenant Charles P. McGary, from the
isturb their equanimity. Importannt from the Valley. We have important information from the Valley of Virginia. Hunter (the successor of Sigel) has advanced as far as Port Republic, in Rockingham county, and Crook is advancing over the Warm Springs road, from the West. Hunter refuses to accept battle from General Jones until he has effected a junction with Crook. It is presumed that we have a sufficient force in that direction to render the safety of Staunton secure. Affairs at m ten to twelve wounded. I will telegraph you more in detail at the earliest moment. I am, very respectfully, W. W. Hunter, Flag Officer. The Water Witch figured somewhat conspicuously in the Paraguay expedition, some years beforwelve men. The enemy lost two killed and twelve wounded. I will report further by letter. I am, very respectfully, W W Hunter, Flag Officer. Lieut. Pendergrast, who commanded the Water Witch, is a son of old Capt. Pendergrast, (now dead
Confederate States Congress. The Senate met on Saturday at 12 o'clock M, Mr. Hunter, of Va, in the chair. Mr. Mitchell, of Ark, introduced a bill to establish a corps of scouts and guards, to facilitate communication with the Trans-Mississippi Department. Referred. Mr. Johnson, of Mo, introduced a bill to provide for paying officers and soldiers, twelve months after the ratification of peace, the loss sustained by them on account of the depreciation of Confederate Treasury Notes. Referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Barnwell, from the Finance Committee, reported back adversely House bill to amend the act to reduce the currency, which, on motion of Mr. Walker, of Miss, was taken up and considered. It provides for allowing loyal persons, and Confederate prisoners of war, who at the times fixed for the funding of the old issue notes, were within the lines of the enemy, to fund the same hereafter within limited periods. After a long discussion the bill was passed.