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that awful potentate King Jeff, the great secesher; He looked exceedingly forlorn, Harassed and vexed, annoyed and worn; 'Twas plain his office didn't return Much profit or much pleasure. Says Jeff (he thus soliloquized:) ”This isn't quite as I surmised; It really cannot be disguised, The thing is getting risky: Winchester, Donelson, Roanoke, Pea Ridge, Port Royal, Burnside's stroke At Newbern — by the Lord, I choke!” Jeff took a drink of whisky. “McClellan, too, and Yankee Foote; Grant, Hunter, Halleck, Farragut, With that accurst Fremont to boot;” (Right here he burst out swearing; And then, half-mad and three parts drunk, Down on his shaking knees he sunk, And prayed like any frightened monk, To ease his blank despairing.) He prayed: ”O mighty Lucifer! Than whom of all that are or were There is no spirit worthier To be our lord and master; O thou Original Secesh! Please pity our poor quaking flesh, And break this tightening Union mesh, And stop this dire disaster! ”We t
18. a Contra-band-ditty. Dar's a mighty famous Hunter in de ‘partment of de Souf-- And he gubberns all ob Dixie, as you know, And he talks to de darkies by de words of his mouf-- Sayina: Niggers, you's at liberty to go! You may lay down de shobel and de hoe-o-o! You may dance wid de fiddle an' de bow ; Dar is no more cotton for de contraband to pick, Dar is no more cotton for to mow! chorus — Den lay down, etc. Bress de Lord and Massa Hunter-we is berry glad to hear Dat he's gwine for to treat de darkies so; While dar's yams in de barn, or dar's corn in de ear, We'll nebber tote de shobel or de hoe! We'll trow down de shobel an' de hoe-o-o-- And we'll dance wid de fiddle an' de bow; Dar is no more cotton for de contraband to pick, An‘ dar's no more rice for to mow! chorus.--Den lay down, etc. --N. Y. Sunday T
the swords of the rebels. The ceremony of surrender took place in one of the casemates, (used by Colonel Olmstead for his own quarters,) at about dark. Five National officers, besides Badeau, were present: Major Halpine, Adjutant-General for Gen. Hunter, Capt. S. H. Pelouze, Capt. Ely, Lieut. O'Rorke, and Lieut. Irwin of the Wabash. Each rebel, as he laid his sword on the table, announced his name and rank. The Colonel said, I yield my sword, but I trust I have not disgraced it ; others mad, and pork were served for supper and breakfast; and for variety, sweet oil was used instead of molasses. The conversation was animated, and often touched on politics. Immediately afterwards, Mr. Badeau was recommended to the President, by Gen. Hunter, for a captaincy, and made bearer of despatches to the Government, announcing the fall of Pulaski. He had also the honor of being mentioned in Gen. Gillmore's formal report of the operations. The President accordingly at once appointed him a
F. Butler had declared that all fugitive slaves would be considered as contraband of war. Congress, however, decided in August that all slaves confiscated should be held subject to the decision of the United States courts. In April of 1862, General Hunter, at Hilton Head, South Carolina, declared that all slaves in his military department were forever free, but a week later Lincoln annulled the proclamation. Hunter, however, raised a storm by organizing a regiment of fugitive slaves. It was Hunter, however, raised a storm by organizing a regiment of fugitive slaves. It was only before Cedar Mountain — to be precise, on July 22, 1862--that all National commanders were ordered to employ as many Negroes as could be used advantageously for military and naval purposes, paying them for their labor and keeping a record as to their ownership as a basis on which compensation could be made in proper cases. Ten days after the battle, Greeley published his famous letter to Lincoln, The Prayer of Twenty millions. On September 22, 1862, the Emancipation Proclamation was issue
irginia Military Institute at Lexington, after Hunter's raid in 1864. The picture shows the blackeneading Virginia military institution after General Hunter's raid through the valley in the early sumontributions to the Confederate cause that General Hunter ordered it to be burned. At any rate, he sburg as McCausland left it. As a reprisal for Hunter's raid in the Shenandoah Valley, the Confederaad soldiers followed the retreating columns of Hunter until the latter had safely filed his men throut not as Lee had expected. Believing that if Hunter were defeated he would retreat down the Valleyn great danger. The question was, how to draw Hunter from his new position. To pursue him further r a march into Maryland, in the hope of luring Hunter from his lair. So Early turned to the north win Pennsylvania was planned as retaliation for Hunter's operations in the Shenandoah. Early succeedfense around Richmond on June 12th, had driven Hunter out of the Shenandoah, and (after marching the[3 more...]
irginia Military Institute at Lexington, after Hunter's raid in 1864. The picture shows the blackeneading Virginia military institution after General Hunter's raid through the valley in the early sumontributions to the Confederate cause that General Hunter ordered it to be burned. At any rate, he rg, Virginia. There was some skirmishing, but Hunter, who did not have enough ammunition to sustainut not as Lee had expected. Believing that if Hunter were defeated he would retreat down the Valleyn great danger. The question was, how to draw Hunter from his new position. To pursue him further r a march into Maryland, in the hope of luring Hunter from his lair. So Early turned to the north wway to Winchester, where General Averell, from Hunter's forces, now at Harper's Ferry, attacked themin Pennsylvania was planned as retaliation for Hunter's operations in the Shenandoah. Early succeedfense around Richmond on June 12th, had driven Hunter out of the Shenandoah, and (after marching the[3 more...]
vision, Army of West Virginia; Confed., Gen. Breckinridge's command. Losses: Union, 25 killed and wounded; Confed., 25 killed and wounded. June 5, 1864: Piedmont, W. Va. Union, portion of Army of West Virginia, commanded by Maj.-Gen. Hunter; Confed., Gen. Vaughn's Cav. Losses: Union, 130 killed, 650 wounded; Confed., 460 killed, 1450 wounded, 1060 missing. Confed. Gen. W. E. Jones killed. June 6, 1864: old River Lake or Lake Chicot, Ark. Union, Sixteenth Co's command, reenforced by two divisions of Lee's army on June 18th. Losses: Union, 1688 killed, 8513 wounded, 1185 missing; Confed. (estimate), 5000 killed, wounded, and missing. June 16, 1864: Otter Creek, near liberty, Va. Union, Hunter's command in advance of the Army of West Virginia; Confed., McCausland's Cav. Losses: Union, 3 killed, 15 wounded. June 17-18, 1864: Lynchburg, Va. Union, Sullivan's and Crook's divisions and Averell's and Duffie's Cav., Army of We
February, moving upon the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, at Patterson's Creek, he captured the guard there, and brought out about twelve hundred cattle and some sheep. On the 7th of June, Sheridan was sent with two divisions to communicate with Hunter, and to break up the Virginia Central Railroad and the James River Canal. He started on this mission with eighty-nine hundred cavalry. On the morning of the 8th, Hampton, who had succeeded Stuart in the command of the Cavalry Corps of the Army rawal of Sheridan's forces, and his rejoining Grant. General Grant, in his Memoirs, states of this withdrawal that Sheridan went back because the enemy had taken possession of a crossing by which he proposed to go west,.and because he heard that Hunter was not at Charlottesville. In September, Lee's army was sorely in need of beef. Scouts reported at Coggin's Point a large but well-guarded herd of cattle, and on the morning of the 11th, Hampton, with his cavalry, started to capture it. Noti
o opposition raised. But this very action left Washington a tempting morsel for a daring raider, and the Confederate commander was not long in taking advantage of that fact. Lee was hard pressed, and he sought to create a diversion by sending Early to threaten, and, if possible, to capture Washington. This ruse of threatening the national capital had been successful before, and he hoped that Grant also might be influenced by it. Early left Lee's army under orders to attack and destroy General Hunter's army in the Shenandoah and then to threaten Washington. Several times during the raid, Lee communicated with Early, leaving the decision of returning or moving on to the judgment of Early, according to the circumstances in which he found himself. On the 10th of July he was within sixteen miles of Washington, in Maryland, and defeated a small detachment of Federal cavalry. Hasty preparations were made in the defenses to muster all the troops possible to repel the invader. General
re needed, they were handled by the Pioneer Corps, or other details from the ranks, under the direction of officers of the Engineer Corps. The bridge on which General Lee's army recrossed the Potomac near Williamsport after the battle of An ingenious device of the Confederates in Pulaski The Confederates had swung upwards the muzzle of this 8-inch smooth-bore sea-coast gun within Fort Pulaski, so that it could be used as a mortar for high-angle fire against the Federal batteries. General Hunter and General Gillmore's troops, supported by the gunboats, had erected these on Jones Island and Tybee Island. Fort Pulaski, commanding the entrance to the Savannah River and covering the passage of blockade runners to and from Savannah, early became an important objective of the Federal forces at Hilton Head. It was of the greatest importance that shells should be dropped into the Federal trenches, and this accounts for the position of the gun in the picture. There was no freedom of re
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