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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 76 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 50 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 49 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 42 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 28 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 35 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Hurlbut or search for Hurlbut in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 4 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—eastern Tennessee. (search)
ward, in order to try and recapture Nashville or even Vicksburg. He wished in that case that Burnside should come to Chattanooga, so as to allow Rosecrans to follow up the enemy, and that Grant should take his troops by railway to meet Bragg as far as Tuscumbia. There was nothing practical except the last part of this Vol. IV.-7 plan. Once at Tuscumbia, Grant would at last have been enabled to give Rosecrans the co-operation which the latter had so vainly demanded up to that time. But Hurlbut at Memphis had only a few troops, and could not lead them beyond Corinth. The rest of the army, commanded by Sherman in the absence of Grant, who was ill at New Orleans, was near Vicksburg, while the despatches, carried by steamboats, reached it only very slowly. On the 18th, Sherman received Halleck's orders: time was required to prepare for their execution. Reinforcements were also requested of Schofield, who had a command in Missouri, and of Pope, who was watching the Indians on the f
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the siege of Chattanooga. (search)
of which we shall hereafter relate the disastrous issue. Hurlbut, with the Sixteenth corps, is recalled to Memphis: one ofays. The despatch of the 15th arrives first, on the 21st; Hurlbut sends it immediately to Grant, who receives it on the 22d. Helena, and to proceed by water as far as Memphis, whence Hurlbut shall direct him by land on Corinth, with two divisions ofivision. Osterhaus had repaired by rail to Corinth, where Hurlbut's two divisions had already arrived. J. E. Smith was preptober his entire corps is at Corinth, and the troops which Hurlbut has stationed en ├ęchelon along the railway are preparing tlabama. But immediately after the affair at Collierville, Hurlbut sent all his cavalry to meet Chalmers. Two days thereaftelarge division, which is immediately started on the way by Hurlbut; McPherson sends by water, to Memphis, Tuttle's division, ailways running to Nashville. At the same time he ordered Hurlbut to abandon the Columbus and Memphis Railroad. The telegra
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
any as far as Panola. On the other hand, the Federals strongly occupy the line of railway from Memphis to Corinth, which it is proposed to force. Grierson, the Union general, whose headquarters are at La Grange, has distributed his three cavalry brigades along that line and watches the crossings on the Wolf River, an important stream which flows from Grand Junction to Memphis, and of which the railway follows the left bank. The principal stations are fortified, and in the last-named city Hurlbut holds himself in readiness promptly to bring forward his infantry on any point menaced by the enemy. Forrest counts for his expedition on the mounted brigade of Tennesseeans recently raised by General Richardson; this command, estimated at two thousand men, is reduced, however, by desertions to two hundred and fifty combatants. It is therefore with five hundred mounted men that he takes the road; he is followed only by two guns and four wagons. But General Lee accompanies him to help p
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
observe as closely as possible McPherson and Hurlbut. Loring's division, seven thousand strong, wson Davis' plantation on the road followed by Hurlbut. Winslow's cavalry had, on the evening of thrps in the destruction of the railroad, while Hurlbut was starting ahead in the direction of Hillsbg returned to take before Decatur the rest of Hurlbut's column, he had also to send to the south Fo lines which crossed each other at Meridian. Hurlbut sent in the direction of Corinth and Demopolie banks of the Mississippi a few days after. Hurlbut brought one of his divisions back to Memphis.sure the free navigation of the Mississippi. Hurlbut and General Brayman, commanding the District serve the movements of the Memphis garrison. Hurlbut, who had about four thousand infantry in this29th, of four companies of artillery, sent by Hurlbut to reinforce the Thirteenth Tennessee and com to occupy the post he has just conquered, as Hurlbut feared, seems to have no other thought than t[5 more...]