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Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
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urned without proceeding with it. In the House, a message was received from the President, accompanying the documents relating to the Trent affair. Mr. Vallandigham, of Ohio, took occasion to express his dissatisfaction at the course pursued by the Government in delivering up Mason and Slidell; remarking that in less than three months we would be at war with Great Britain, or else we would tamely submit to the recognition of the Southern Confederacy, and the breaking up of the blockade. Mr. Hutchins, his colleague, replied, saying that Vallandigham had heretofore been opposed to coercion as to the South, while now he is against the delivery up of Mason and Slidell, and consequently in favor of war. The position of his colleague was liable to suspicion that his belligerent attitude was one which would benefit the rebels, by causing a war between England and the United States--a war which the South desired. Mr. Thomas, of Massachusetts, argued in justification of the capture of Mason
tory of the times. The bills proposing the indiscriminate confiscation of Southern property, and the disfranchisement of Southern citizens, have been already alluded to by us as measures of atrocity such as no truly civilized and Christian nation could endorse. We notice from the late Northern papers, that this pretended right of legislation for the Confederate States is still claimed by the Washington Parliament, and that we are to have a happy exemplification of it in a bill which one Mr. Hutchins, of Ohio, has announced that he will soon introduce into the lower house of that august body. This measure very humanely proposes that the enlightened and Christian North shall assume complete control over the ignorant and barbarous South, reducing all her States to the condition of a territorial or provincial government, and then immediately abolish slavery within their limits. This is another specimen of that wild and ferocious fanaticism which has seized on the Northern mind since
bill be laid on the table; which was beaten: Yeas 47; Nays 66. The amendment of the Judiciary Committee was then agreed to; the bill, as amended, ordered to be read a third time, and passed, as follows: Yeas--Messrs. Aldrich, Alley, Arnold, Ashley, Babbitt, Baxter, Beaman, Bingham, Francis P. Blair, Samuel S. Blair, Blake, Buffinton, Chamberlain, Clark, Colfax, Frederick A. Conkling, Covode, Duell, Edwards, Eliot, Fenton, Fessenden, Franchot, Frank, Granger, Gurley, Hanchett, Harrison, Hutchins, Julian, Kelley, Francis W. Kellogg, William Kellogg, Lansing, Loomis, Lovejoy, McKean. Mitchell, Justin S. Morrill, Olin, Pot-ter, Alex. H. Rice, Edward H. Rollins, Sedgwick, Sheffield, Shellabarger, Sherman, Sloan, Spaulding, Stevens, Benj. F. Thomas, Train, Van Horne, Verree, Wallace, Charles W. Walton, E. P. Walton, Wheeler, Albert S. White, and Windom--60. Nays--Messrs. Allen, Ancona, Joseph Baily, George H. Browne, Burnett, Calvert, Cox, Cravens, Crisfield, Crittenden, Diven, Dunla
Wilson, of Mo., and Wright--14. This bill having reached the House, Mr. Stevens, of Pa., in Committee of the Whole, moved April 10. the laying aside successively of each bill preceding it on the calendar, and thus reached this one; which was taken up and debated by Judge Thomas, of Mass., and Mr. Crittenden, of Ky., in opposition. Mr. Stevens tried to close the debate next day, but failed; and the bill was advocated by Messrs. F. P. Lair, of Mo., Bingham, Blake, Riddle, Ashley, and Hutchins, of Ohio, Rollins, of N. H., and Van Horn, of N. Y. Mr. Stevens at length induced the Committee to rise and report the bill; when the measure was further opposed by Messrs. H. B. Wright, of Pa., Wadsworth, Harding, Menzies, and Wickliffe, of Ky., and supported by Messrs. Hickman, of Pa., Train, of Mass., Lovejoy, of Ill., Dunn, of Ind., Cox and Vallandigham, of Ohio; and passed under the Previous Question: Yeas 92; Nays 39. [Messrs. G. H. Browne, of R. I., English, of Conn., Haight and Ode
rd, Kellogg, Little-john, Marvin, Miller, Morris, Nelson, Odell, Pomeroy, Radford, Steele, Van Valkenburg. New Jersey--Starr. Pennsylvania--Baily, Broomall, Coffroth, Hale, Kelley, McAllister, Moorhead, A. Myers, L. Myers, C. O'Neill, Schofield, Stevens, Thayer, Tracy, Williams. Delaware--Smithers. Maryland--Cresswell, Henry Winter Davis, F. Thomas, Webster. West Virginia--Blair, Brown, Whaley. Kentucky--Anderson, Randall, Smith, Yeaman. Ohio — Ashley, Eckley, Garfield, Hutchins, Schenck, Spaulding. Indiana--Colfax, Dumont, Julian, Orth. Illinois--Arnold, Farnsworth, Ingersoll, Norton, E. B. Washburne. Missouri--Blow, Boyd, King, Knox, Loan, McClurg, J. S. Rollins. Michigan--A. C. Baldwin, Beaman, Driggs, F. W. Kellogg, Longyear, Upson. Iowa — Allison, Grinnell, A. W. Hubbard, Kasson, Price, Wilson. Wisconsin--Cobb, McIndoe, Sloan, Wheeler. Minnesota--Donnelly, Windom. Kansas--Wilder. Oregon--McBride. Nevada--Worthington. California
f. If this is the case, the affair has been a great benefit to the community, as this Parker has been the terror of all isolated Union families in this region of country. Lieut. Nettleton deserves much credit for the manner in which the affair was conducted, and the boys went in with a relish which shows that their title of Wade and Hutchins cavalry, is not out of compliment to their men alone, but because they combine the pluck and fierceness of old Ben Wade with the activity of Hutchins. f. If this is the case, the affair has been a great benefit to the community, as this Parker has been the terror of all isolated Union families in this region of country. Lieut. Nettleton deserves much credit for the manner in which the affair was conducted, and the boys went in with a relish which shows that their title of Wade and Hutchins cavalry, is not out of compliment to their men alone, but because they combine the pluck and fierceness of old Ben Wade with the activity of Hutchins.
he proposition in good faith; he would suspend hostilities for present negotiation to try the temper of the South. Mr. Wright, of Pennsylvania, emphatically declared that the proposition held out to rebellious men a reward for their treason. Mr. Hutchins, of Ohio, moved to amend the proposition so that those commissioners should see that the war is vigorously prosecuted to the effectual putting down of this rebellion. Mr. Vallandigham declared he had moved his amendment to be read hereafter, and to be read and pondered by the people. Mr. Hutchins's amendment was lost; forty-four members only voting for it, and Mr. Vallandigham's amendment was then rejected, only twenty-one members voting for it. On motion of Mr. Curtis, of Iowa, the bill was so amended as to give the President authority to raise troops and appoint officers for them whenever the State authorities should neglect or refuse to do so. Mr. Diven, of New-York, moved to amend the fourth section so as to require the majo
s.) I take pleasure in reporting that the attack along my whole front was gallantly and successfully repelled by my brigade. No enemy ever arrived within fifty yards of my front, and even after my left was broken by the attack in rear and flank, the enemy in front had been so sharply repulsed that he did not venture to come again. Officers and men generally acted with gallantry. Lieutenant Z. C. Gunn, Fourteenth.Tennessee, fell in the most gallant discharge of his duty. Lieutenant-Colonel Hutchins, of the Nineteenth Georgia, mentions particularly the good conduct of Captain Mabry, Lieutenants W. H. Johnson and M. Edwards, Sergeant Shell, and Corporal Rogan. Lieutenants 0. H. Thomas and George Lemmon, of my staff, rendered me gallant and efficient service throughout the action. My loss in the action was forty killed, two hundred and eleven wounded, and one hundred and sixty-six missing, supposed to have been captured. Among the wounded were Colonel Turney, Lieutenan
reviously, the Fiftieth Virginia, Captain Matthews, and a detachment of a South Carolina regiment, under Major Gordon, had joined me as reenforcements. The enemy did not show himself again outside of his works. At four o'clock I was relieved, by the direction of Major-General A. P. Hill, under the command of General Pender. We took position soon after in the trenches about Chancellorsville, where we lay until ordered back to our camp, near Grace Church. Colonels Zachery, Graybill, and Hutchins led their regiments with spirit and energy. Captain Gratten, assistant adjutant-general, and Lieutenant Randle, aid-de-camp, were indefatigable in their efforts, and conspicuously bold in the discharge of their duties. Mr. H. H. Colquitt, acting upon my staff, bore himself with spirit and coolnesss. Especial credit is due Captain William M. Arnold, Sixth Georgia regiment, who commanded the battalion of skirmishers. His energy, zeal, and gallantry won my admiration. A. H. Colquitt, Br
hey cut off the blank for the axe-head, and shape and weld it while being held between the dies by means of a mandrel in the hands of the attendant. At the side of the machine is a punch for trimming the eye and a trip-hammer with suitable dies for trimming the head. The axe under treatment is moved from one operative part of the machine to another, and swaged to form by successive blows. Fig. 476 represents a machine in which the axe is made by successive operations between dies. Hutchins's machine for making axes. In this illustration, Fig. 1 is a front elevation; Fig. 2 is a side view of the dies p p, and Figs. 3 and 4 are sections of the dies. Fig. 5 is the iron blank. Figs. 6, 7, and 8 are the shapes it successively assumes as it comes from between the rollerdies c c and p p, and the bending apparatus z s t. The dies, by successive operations, give it the proper shape on both sides; it is then placed on the upper face of the former, which corresponds to the inner
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