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Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Hutchins or search for Hutchins in all documents.

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urned without proceeding with it. In the House, a message was received from the President, accompanying the documents relating to the Trent affair. Mr. Vallandigham, of Ohio, took occasion to express his dissatisfaction at the course pursued by the Government in delivering up Mason and Slidell; remarking that in less than three months we would be at war with Great Britain, or else we would tamely submit to the recognition of the Southern Confederacy, and the breaking up of the blockade. Mr. Hutchins, his colleague, replied, saying that Vallandigham had heretofore been opposed to coercion as to the South, while now he is against the delivery up of Mason and Slidell, and consequently in favor of war. The position of his colleague was liable to suspicion that his belligerent attitude was one which would benefit the rebels, by causing a war between England and the United States--a war which the South desired. Mr. Thomas, of Massachusetts, argued in justification of the capture of Mason
tory of the times. The bills proposing the indiscriminate confiscation of Southern property, and the disfranchisement of Southern citizens, have been already alluded to by us as measures of atrocity such as no truly civilized and Christian nation could endorse. We notice from the late Northern papers, that this pretended right of legislation for the Confederate States is still claimed by the Washington Parliament, and that we are to have a happy exemplification of it in a bill which one Mr. Hutchins, of Ohio, has announced that he will soon introduce into the lower house of that august body. This measure very humanely proposes that the enlightened and Christian North shall assume complete control over the ignorant and barbarous South, reducing all her States to the condition of a territorial or provincial government, and then immediately abolish slavery within their limits. This is another specimen of that wild and ferocious fanaticism which has seized on the Northern mind since