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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stedman, Edmund Clarence 1833- (search)
Stedman, Edmund Clarence 1833- Author; born in Hartford, Conn., Oct. 8, 1833; was a member of the class of 1853 of Yale College; on the editorial staff of the New York Tribune in 1859-61; war correspondent of the New York World in 1861-63; and has been an active member of the New York Stock Exchange since 1869. He is best known as a poet and critic. Among his notable critical works are Victorian poets (1875); Poets of America (1885); A Victorian Anthology (1895) ; and An American Anthology (1900). He was associated with Ellen M. Hutchinson in the editorship of A Library of American Literature (11 volumes, 1888-89), and with Prof. D. E. Woodbury in that of The works of Edgar Allan Poe (10 volumes, 1895).
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tea in politics. (search)
ibuters. They were requested to refrain from receiving the proscribed article. The request of a public meeting in Philadelphia, Oct. 2, 1773, that Messrs. Wharton should not act, was complied with, and their answer was received with shouts of applause. Another firm refused, and they were greeted with groans and hisses. A public meeting in Boston (Nov. 5) appointed a committee to wait upon the consignees in that town and request them to resign. These consignees were all friends of Governor Hutchinson—two of them were his sons and a third his nephew. They had been summoned to attend a meeting of the Sons of Liberty (under Liberty Tree) and resign their appointments. They contemptuously refused to comply; now, in the presence of the town committee, they so equivocated that the meeting voted their answer unsatisfactory and daringly affrontive. Another committee was appointed for the same purpose at a meeting on the 18th, when the consignees replied: It is out of our power to com
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Preface (search)
native literature who have been most emphasized by our literary historians, we have attempted to do a new service by giving a place in our record to departments of literature, such as travels, oratory, memoirs, which have lain somewhat out of the main tradition of literary history but which may be, as they are in the United States, highly significant of the national temper. In this task we have been much aided by the increasing number of monographs produced within the past quarter of a century upon aspects of American literary history. Such collections as A Library of American literature, edited by Edmund Clarence Stedman and Ellen M. Hutchinson in 1889-90, and the Library of Southern literature (1908-13), compiled by various Southern men of letters, have been indispensable. In the actual preparation of the work we have been indebted for many details to the unsparing assistance of Mrs Carl Van Doren, who has also compiled the index. June, 1917. W. P. T. J. E. S. P. S. C. V. D.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XI (search)
ming nearest to a regularity of rhythm. The praise generally bestowed on the admirable selections in the Library of American Literature, by Mr. Stedman and Miss Hutchinson, is a proof that there is a certain consensus of opinion on this subject. Had they left out Austin's Peter Rugg, or Hale's A Man Without a Country, there wou with that unsurpassed poetic symbol of hopeless remoteness— As the pearl in the depths of the sea From the portionless king who would wear it. In the case of Miss Hutchinson, her exquisite little poem of The Moth-Song will be equally unmistakable. When Harriet Prescott Spofford's first youthful story, Sir Rohan's Ghost, originallf wrote of that rare and unappreciated thinker, Brownlee Brown; and he is less known now than he was then; yet his poem on Immortality, preserved by Stedman and Hutchinson, is so magnificent that it cheapens most of its contemporary literature, and seems alone worth a life otherwise obscure. It is founded on Xenophon's well-known
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XVIII (search)
test of greatness, nor do any of the efforts to ascertain it by any other test succeed much better. The balloting in various newspapers for the best hundred authors or the forty immortals has always turned out to be limited by the constituency of the particular publication which attempted the experiment; or sometimes even by the action of jocose cliques, combining to force up the vote of pet candidates. As regards American authors, the great Library of American Literature of Stedman and Hutchinson aims to furnish a sort of Westminster Abbey or Valhalla, where the relative value of different writers may be roughly gauged by the number of pages assigned to each candidate for fame. But this again is determined by the taste of the compilers, and their judgment, however catholic, is not infallible. Still another test, and one coming nearer to a general popular consensus may be sought in the excellent catalogues which are now prepared for our public libraries—catalogues in which the lis
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, Index (search)
109, 142, 159, 189, 229. Hemans, F. D., 179. High-water marks, concerning, 97. Hogg, James, 169. Holmes, O. W., 54, 62, 67, 97, 99, 178, 205. Holt, Henry, 172. Homer, 48, 98, 114, 169, 171, 190, 217. Horace, 16, 48, 99, 114. Houghton, Lord, 19, 56, 62, 94. Howells, W. D., 13, 15, 66, 114, 118, 171, 184, 194, 201, 202, 210, 229. Howe, E. W. 11. Howe, Julia Ward, 67, 100. Hugo, Victor, 49, 56, 68, 110. Humboldt, A. von, 73, 176. Humor, American, perils of, 128. Hutchinson, Ellen M., 101, 102. Huxley, T. H., 137, 158. I. Ideals, personal, 106. Iffland, A. W., 90. International copyright law, 122. Irving, Washington, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 20, 64, 216. J. Jackson, Andrew, 110. Jackson, Helen, 68, 102. James, G. P. R., 94. James, Henry, 65, 66, 84, 114, 118, 184. Jefferson, Thomas, 4, 5, 11, 110, 155. Johnson, Samuel, 197. Joubert, Joseph, 26, 96, 194, 195. Jouffroy, T. S., 216. Junius, 190. K. Keats, John, 86, 103. Kipling, Rudyard, 15.