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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Charles ii. 1630- (search)
rles in the gardens at Hampton Court, and presented their memorial so full of pious pretensions, the monarch, after looking each man in the face for a moment, with a merry twinkle in his eves, burst into loud laughter, in which his audience joined involuntarily. Then taking up a little shaggy spaniel, with large meek eyes, and holding it at arm's-length before them, he said, Good friends, here is a model of piety and sincerity which it might be wholesome for you to copy. Then, tossing the little pet to Clarendon, he said, There, Hyde, is a worthy prelate; make him archbishop of the domain I shall give you. With grim satire, Charles introduced into the preamble of their charter that the petitioners, excited with a laudable and pious zeal for the propagation of the Gospel, have begged a certain country in the parts of America not yet cultivated and planted, and only inhabited by some barbarous people who have no knowledge of God. See State of North Carolina; State of South Carolina.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornbury, Edward Hyde, Lord -1723 (search)
Cornbury, Edward Hyde, Lord -1723 Colonial governor; was sent to the province of New York as governor in 1702, when he was Sir Edward Hyde, grandson of the first Earl of Clarendon, and nephew, by marriage, of James II. He was one of the officers of that monarch's household, and was the first to desert him and go over to the Prince of Orange, who became William III, of England. Grateful for this act, William made him governor of the united provinces of New York and New Jersey. He was cordially and generously received. The Assembly, which was largely Leislerian in its political composition, and claimed Hyde as a friend, voted him a double salary, a disbursement of the expenses of his voyage, and a reversion of seven years. A public dinner was given him, and the freedom of the city in a gold box. His suite, the soldiers of the garrison, and all citizens unable to purchase their freedom, were made freemen, with rights of suffrage, trade, and of holding office. This generous rec
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), De Peyster, Abraham, 1658-1728 (search)
De Peyster, Abraham, 1658-1728 Jurist; born in New Amsterdam (New York), July 8, 1658; eldest son of Johannes De Peyster, a noted merchant of his day. Between 1691 and 1695 he was mayor of the city of New York; was first assistant justice and then chief-justice of New York, and was one of the King's council under Governor Hyde (afterwards Lord Cornbury), and as its president was acting-governor for a time in 1701. Judge De Peyster was colonel of the forces in New York and treasurer of that province and New Jersey. He was a personal friend and correspondent of William Penn. Having amassed considerable wealth, he built a fine mansion, which stood, until 1856, in Pearl street. It was used by Washington as his headquarters for a while in 1776. He died in New York City Aug. 10, 1728.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Episcopacy in America. (search)
k, and earnestly recommended as a remedy for all these social evils to send over a bishop to the province of New York duly qualified as suffragan to the Bishop of London, and five or six young ministers, with Bibles and prayer-books; to unite New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Rhode Island into one province; and the bishop to be appointed governor, at a salary of $7,200, his Majesty to give him the King's Farm of 30 acres, in New York, as a seat for himself and his successors. When Sir Edward Hyde (afterwards Lord Cornbury) became governor of the combined provinces of New York and New Jersey, in 1702, even violent efforts were used to make the liturgy and ritual of the Church of England the state system of worship. He denied the right of preachers or schoolmasters to exercise their functions in the province without a bishop's license; and when the corporation of New York resolved to establish a grammar-school, the Bishop of London was requested to send over a teacher. In viola
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Jersey, (search)
west Jersey were left without a regular civil government, and so remained several years. Finally, wearied with contentions and subjected to losses, the proprietors surrendered the domain of the Jerseys to the crown (1702), and the dissolute Sir Edward Hyde (Lord Cornbury), governor of New York, ruled over the province. Politically, the people were made slaves. It remained a dependency of New York until 1738, when it was made an independent colony, and so remained until the Revolutionary War.est Jersey Proprietors 1691 Col. Joseph Dudley 1691 Andrew Hamilton 1692 Andrew Hamilton 1692 Jeremiah Basse 1697 Jeremiah Basse1698 Andrew Hamilton 1699 Andrew Bowne, deputy 1699 Andrew Hamilton 1699 Royal governors. Assumes office. Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury 1702 Lord Lovelace 1708 Richard Ingoldsby, lieutenant-governor 1709 Robert Hunter 1710 William Burnett1720 John Montgomery1728 Lewis Morris, president of council1731 William Crosby 1732 John Anderson, president of counci
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, State of (search)
re them, he said, Good friends, here is a model of piety and sincerity which it might be wholesome for you to copy. Then, tossing it to Clarendon, he said, There, Hyde, is a worthy prelate; make him archbishop of the domain which I shall give you. With grim satire, Charles introduced into the preamble of the charter a statement derson Walkerpresident of council1699 Robert Danielappointed deputy gov1704 Thomas Careyappointed deputy gov1705 William Gloverpresident of councilMay, 1709 Edward Hydepresident of councilAug., 1710 Edward Hydeappointed governorJan. 24, 1712 Thomas Pollockpresident of councilSept. 12, 1712 Charles Edenassumes office as govMaEdward Hydeappointed governorJan. 24, 1712 Thomas Pollockpresident of councilSept. 12, 1712 Charles Edenassumes office as govMay 28, 1714 Thomas Pollockpresident of councilMar. 30, 1722 William Reedpresident of councilSept. 7, 1722 George Burringtonassumes office as govJan. 15, 1724 Sir Richard Everardassumes office as govJuly 17, 1725 Royal governors. George Burringtonassumes officeFeb. 25, 1731 Nathaniel Ricepresident of councilApr. 17, 1734 Ga
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Savannah, Ga. (search)
Savannah, Ga. The chief commercial city of Georgia; 18 miles from the Atlantic Ocean; county seat of Chatham county; noted for its large exports of cotton, naval stores, rice, and lumber; population in 1900, 54,244. Late in 1778 Sir Henry Clinton de- A view of Savannah. spatched Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell with about 2,000 men to invade Georgia. He sailed from New York on Nov. 27, under convoy of a portion of Commodore Hyde Plan of the siege of Savannah, Oct. 9, 1779. Parker's fleet. They arrived at the mouth of the Savannah on Dec. 23, and, after much hinderance, made their way towards Savannah, opposed by Gen. Robert Howe with about 600 Continentals and a few hundred militia. Howe was defeated, and fled, pursued by the invaders. Savannah passed into the hands of the British, with 453 prisoners, forty-eight cannon, twenty-three mortars, the fort (with its ammunition and stores), the shipping in the river, and a large quantity of provisions. The Americans lost, in kil
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Jersey, (search)
east Jersey built at Middletown......1688 Governor Barclay dies......Oct. 3, 1690 Presbyterian churches established in Freehold and Woodbridge......1692 First school law of the State enacted by the General Assembly of east New Jersey at Perth Amboy, to maintain a school-master within the town......Oct. 12, 1693 Burlington incorporated......1693 Salem incorporated......1695 Government of New Jersey surrendered to the crown, and both provinces united......April 17, 1702 Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury, appointed governor of New York and New Jersey by Queen Anne......Nov. 16, 1702 General Assembly meets at Perth Amboy......Nov. 10, 1703 First association of Seventh-day Baptists formed in Piscataway......April, 1707 Lord Cornbury, removed from office by Queen Anne, is imprisoned for debt by his creditors......1709 Paper money first issued in New Jersey......1709 Assembly votes to aid the English expedition against the French in Canada......July 16, 1711 S
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
n the Dutch church, Garden Street......1699 Governor Bellomont dies at New York......March 5, 1701 Kidd is denounced as a pirate, and, returning to New York, and thence to Boston, is there arrested and ultimately sent to England, where he is tried, convicted, and hanged, with nine accomplices, at Execution Dock, London......May 24, 1701 William III. of England dies......March 8, 1702 Queen Anne succeeds......702 Lieut.-Gov. John Nanfan acts as governor until the arrival of Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury......May 3, 1702 Yellow fever in New York. General Assembly at Jamaica, L. I.......1702 Lord Cornbury prohibits Presbyterians from preaching without his license......1707 Lord Cornbury removed; succeeded by Lord Lovelace, who arrives......Dec. 18, 1708 Slave market established at the foot of Wall Street, New York......1709 Lord Lovelace dies......May 12, 1709 Lieutenant-Governor Ingoldsby, acting governor......1709 Expedition fitted out against Montreal;
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Walworth, Reuben Hyde 1788-1867 (search)
ritish invasion of Plattsburg, in September, 1814, he was aide to Gen. Benjamin Mooers, by whom he was assigned to view the naval fight from the shore and to report the resuits. He held a seat in Congress in 1821-23; was judge of the fourth judicial district of New York in 1823-28; and chancellor of New York State in 1828-48. In the latter year the court of chancery was abolished by the adoption of the new constitution. He published Rules and orders of the New York Court of Chancery, and Hyde genealogy (2 volumes). He died in Saratoga Springs, N. Y., Nov. 27, 1867. His son, Mansfield Tracy, born in Albany, N. Y., Dec. 3, 1830, graduated at Union College in 1849 and at the Harvard Law School in 1852; was admitted to the bar in 1855, but soon abandoned law and devoted himself to literature. He was the author of Life of Chancellor Livingston and many novels. He was shot and killed by his son, who claimed that he committed the act to save his mother's life, in New York City, June
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