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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 26 2 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Jackson at Harper's Ferry in 1861. (search)
s discovered by one of our party, who induced a friend to follow the negro and take the dispatch from him. This perhaps prevented troops being sent to head us off. My telegram to the Staunton Artillery produced wild excitement, and spread rapidly through the county, and brought thousands of people to Staunton during the day. Augusta had been a strong Union county, and a doubt was raised by some whether I was acting under the orders of Governor Letcher. To satisfy them, my brother, George W. Imboden, sent a message to me at Gordonsville, inquiring under whose authority I had acted. On the arrival of the train at Gordonsville, Captain Harman received the message and replied to it in my name, that I was acting by order of the governor. Harman had been of the committee, the night before, that waited on Governor Letcher, and he assumed that by that hour-noon — the convention must have voted the State out of the Union, and that the governor had kept his promise to send orders by wire
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Fire, sword, and the halter. (search)
eight hundred men; the two temporary conglomerate brigades under Colonels Brown and Jones, of about one thousand men each, and about seven hundred reserves, a total of between four thousand and four thousand five hundred men, including the two batteries, he was entirely confident that he could whip Hunter. We fully expected an attack early on the morning of the 4th. The enemy not appearing, however, up to ten o'clock, I sent a regiment of cavalry — the Eighteenth Virginia, under Colonel George W. Imboden--to Hunter's side of the river to find out what he was doing. In a couple of hours it was ascertained that he had left the main road leading from Winchester to Staunton, and was marching to the southeastward to Port Republic, at the junction of the North and South rivers, which unite there near the foot of the Blue Ridge and form the Shenandoah. This flank movement disappointed and somewhat disconcerted General Jones. It imposed on him the necessity of a night march over roads h
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
Hampton, Robertson, Fitzhugh Lee, Jenkins, W. E. Jones, and W. H. F. Lee, and six batteries of horseartillery under Major R. F. Beckham. To these should be added Imboden's command, a strong brigade of over 2000 effective horsemen and a battery of horse-artillery, which had been operating in the mountain country and was now near Stnceded to, the Confederate cavalry. In this respect the affair was an important one. It did not, however, delay Lee's designs on the valley; he had already sent Imboden toward Cumberland to destroy the railroad and canal from that place to Martinsburg. Milroy's Federal division, about 9000 strong, occupied Winchester, with McRring the withdrawal of the First and Eleventh corps through the town to Cemetery Hill, there was hard fighting in the college grounds.--editors. to the Potomac. Imboden, his work of destruction completed, had taken post at Hancock. Longstreet and Hill crossed the Potomac on the 24th and 25th and directed their march on Chambersb
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.53 (search)
ended upon for an assault.; the others could be used as supports, and to follow up a success. The artillery was almost intact. Stuart had arrived with his cavalry, excepting the brigades of Jones and Robertson, guarding the communications; and Imboden had also come up. General Lee, therefore, directed the renewal of operations both on the right and left. Ewell had been ordered to attack at daylight on July 3d, and during the night reenforced Johnson with Smith's, Daniel's, and O'Neal's briga. On the 5th, whilst Lee was moving through the passes, French destroyed the pontoon-bridge at Falling Waters. On the 6th--as Meade was leaving Gettysburg — Buford attacked at Williamsport and Kilpatrick toward Hagerstown, on his right, but as Imboden's train guard was strong, Stuart was up, and Longstreet close by, they had to withdraw. [See p. 427.] The enemy proceeded to construct a new bridge and intrench a strong line covering Williamsport and Falling Waters. There were heavy rains on
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate retreat from Gettysburg. (search)
ung's cavalry and Hart's battery began the ascent of the mountain near Cashtown — that the entire column was seventeen miles long when drawn out on the road and put in motion. As an advance-guard I had placed the 18th Virginia Cavalry, Colonel George W. Imboden, in front with a section of McClanahan's battery. Next to them, by request, was placed an ambulance carrying, stretched side by side, two of North Carolina's most distinguished soldiers, Generals Pender and Scales, both badly wounded, nfusion. I had a narrow escape from capture by one of these parties — of perhaps fifty men that I tried to drive off with canister from two of McClanahan's guns that were close at hand. They would perhaps have been too much for me, had not Colonel Imboden, hearing the firing turned back with his regiment at a gallop, and by the suddenness of his movement surrounded and caught the entire party. To add to our perplexities still further, a report reached me a little after sunrise, that the Fe
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A prisoner's march from Gettysburg to Staunton. (search)
nk they feared an advance by Harper's Ferry and Martinsburg. The cavalry and flying artillery came from that direction; Imboden's men told us so, and I never gave up hope until we had passed Winchester. A brigade composed of infantry, cavalry, and artillery under General Imboden guarded us from this point to Staunton, a distance of over 1.20 miles, I think. It seemed five hundred miles to me, for I was barefooted and the pike had been recently repaired. The mode of marching us was now foillery marched en masse between the divisions, while the infantry marched in two files, one at each side of the column. Imboden's brigade did not seem to have seen much hard service, at least I thought so because their clothes were new, yet the gene guards they upbraided the Confederates for theft and violence north of the Potomac. It must have been very galling to Imboden's command to be reviled that way by their countrywomen, but they bore it with cast-down heads, and made no reply. We co
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
s Horse Artillery, Maj. R. F. Beckham: Va. Battery, Capt. James Breathed; Va. Battery, Capt. R. P. Chew; Maryland Battery, Capt. W. H. Griffin; S. C. Battery, Capt. J. F. Hart; Va. Battery, Capt. W. M. McGregor; Va. Battery, Capt. M. N. Moorman. Imboden's Command, Brig.-Gen. John D. Imboden: 18th Va. Cav., Col. George W. Imboden; 62d Va. (mounted infantry), Col. George H. Smith; Va. Partisan Rangers, Capt. John H. McNeill; Va. Battery, Capt. J. H. McClanahan. According to the reports of brigCol. George W. Imboden; 62d Va. (mounted infantry), Col. George H. Smith; Va. Partisan Rangers, Capt. John H. McNeill; Va. Battery, Capt. J. H. McClanahan. According to the reports of brigade and other subordinate commanders the total loss of the Confederate Army was 2592 killed, 12,709 wounded, and 5150 captured or missing =20,451. Several of the reports indicate that many of the missing were killed or wounded. Rolls on file in the office of the Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, bear the names of 12,227 wounded and unwounded Confederates captured at and about Gettysburg from July 1st to 5th, inclusive. The number of wounded prisoners is reported by the medical director of Meade's
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Relative strength of the armies. (search)
sisting of ten batteries, are not included in the above figures. Their effective strength may, however, be put at 800 officers and men. There were also 6116 officers borne on the return as present for duty, which, added to the foregoing, give an aggregate of 75,268 officers and men. The accessions by organizations to the army between May 31st and July 3d, were as follows; Estimated at not less than 1st. Pettigrew's infantry brigade 2,000 2d. Jenkins's cavalry brigade 1,600 3d. Imboden's cavalry brigade 2,000 Total gain 5,600 The loss by organizations during the same period was: 1st. Corse's brigade and one regiment of Pettigrew's brigade left at Hanover Court House, Va 2,000 2d. Three regiments of Early's division left at Winchester, Va 1,000 3d. One regiment of Stuart's cavalry left in Virginia 350   Total loss (estimated) 3,350 or a net gain of 2250, which, added to the strength on May 31st, of 75,268, makes a maximum in the campaign of 77,518. After ma
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of New Market, Va., May 15th, 1864. (search)
Lee. I had with me the 62d Virginia Infantry, mounted, Colonel Geo. H. Smith; the 23d Virginia Cavalry, Colonel Robert White; the 18th Virginia Cavalry, Colonel George W. Imboden; Major Harry Gilmor's Maryland battalion of cavalry; a part of Major Sturgis Davis's Maryland battalion of cavalry, Captain J. H. McNeill's Rangers, Capturn as long as possible. I summoned Colonel Smith, of the 62d, to my headquarters, and informed him confidentially of my intention to take the 18th Regiment, Colonel Imboden's, McNeill's Rangers, and two guns of McClanahan's battery and that night cross the North Mountain through a pass called The Devil's hole, and intercept the einner. Whilst we were at table a courier arrived with a message from Colonel Smith to me that Sigel's cavalry, 2500 strong, had reached Rude's Hill, and that Colonel Imboden of the 18th was falling back skirmishing, but was so vigorously pressed that he, Smith, had formed line of battle just west of the town to cover the 18th in i
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at New Market, Va., May 15, 1864. (search)
y, McLaughlin's Battalion, Maj. William McLaughlin; Cadet Battery Section, Lieut. C. H. Minge. Cavalry, Imboden's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John D. Imboden: 62d Va. (mounted infantry), Col. George I. Smith; 23d Va., Col. Robert White; 18th Va., Col. George W. Imboden; Gilmor's Maryland Battalion, Maj. Harry Gilmor; Davis's Maryland Battalion (detachment), Maj. Sturgis Davis; Partisan Rangers, Capt. John H. McNeill; McClanahan's Va. Battery, Capt. J. H. McClanahan. In an address delivered at the anninridge's strength at 4816, as follows: Wharton's brigade, 1578; Echols's brigade, 1622; engineer co., 56; cadet corps, 227; company of Missourians, 70; Jackson's battery, 100; Chapman's battery, 135; Callahan's battery, 93; cadet's section, 35; Imboden's cavalry (not including the 62d Va., with Wharton), 900. The losses were 42 killed, 522 wounded, and 13 missing == 577. These figures include the losses of the cadet corps, which numbered 225, and sustained a loss of 8 killed and 46 wounded.
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