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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Jackson at Harper's Ferry in 1861. (search)
Jackson at Harper's Ferry in 1861. John D. Imboden, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. Richmond, Virginia, in 1861. from a sketch. The movement to capture Harper's Ferry, Virginia, and the fire-arms manufactured and stored there was organized at the Exchange Hotel in Richmond on the night of April 16th, 1861. Ex-Governor Henry A. Wise was at the head of this purely impromptu affair. The Virginia Secession Convention, then sitting, was by a large majority Union in its sentiment till Sumter was fired on and captured, and Mr. Lincoln called for seventy-five thousand men to enforce the laws in certain Southern States. Virginia was then, as it were, forced to take sides, and she did not hesitate. I had been one of the candidates for a seat in that convention from Augusta county, but had been overwhelmingly defeated by the Union candidates, because I favored secession as the only peace measure Virginia could then adopt, our aim being to put the State in an independent position t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing armies at the first Bull Run. (search)
oss: k, 60; w, 293 = 353. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. B. E. Bee (k): 4th Ala., Col. Jones (k), Col. S. R. Gist; 2d Miss., Col. W. C. Falkner; 11th Miss. (2 cos.), Lieut.-Col. P. F. Liddell; 6th N. C., Col. C. F. Fisher (k). Loss: k, 95; w, 309; m, 1 = 405. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. K. Smith (w), Col. Arnold Elzey: 1st Md. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. George H. Steuart; 3d Tennessee, Col. John C. Vaughn; 10th Va., Col. S. B. Gibbons; 13th Va., Col. A. P. Hill. Loss: k, 8; w, 19 = 27. Artillery: Imboden's, Stanard's, Pendleton's, Alburtis's, and Beckham's batteries. Cavalry: 1st Va., Col. J. E. B. Stuart. (Loss not specifically reported.) Total loss Army of the Shenandoah: k, 282; w, 1063; m, 1 = 1346. Total loss of the Confederate Army: killed, 387; wounded, 1582; captured or missing, 13,--grand total, 1982. Strength of the Confederate army. In October, 1884, General Thomas Jordan, who was General Beauregard's adjutant-general, prepared a statement of the strength of the Confed
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Incidents of the first Bull Run. (search)
Incidents of the first Bull Run. John D. Imboden, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. From the day of his arrival at Winchester [see page 124], General Johnston was ceaseless in his labors to improve the efficiency of his little army, in which he was greatly assisted by several staff-officers who afterward rose to high distinction. xandria battery Latham's, I thinktook part in the conflict on the north side of Young's Branch to our right and across the Plan of the Bull Run battle-field. Imboden's second position is on the line of the Confederate front as formed by Jackson. Finally the Confederate line reached from behind the Robinson house to the left along the edge of the pines, and (as reinforcements came up) made a concave arc to a point behind the Chinn house. General Imboden counted twenty-six Confederate guns in the semicircle east of the Sudley road, when Griffin and Ricketts had taken position near the Henry house.-editors. turnpike, so long as Bee, Bartow, Evans, and Whe
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Responsibilities of the first Bull Run. (search)
on each flank by the continually arriving enemy, General Bee fell back to the position from which he had moved to rescue Evans — crossing the valley, closely pressed by the Federal army. Hampton with his Legion reached the valley as the retrograde movement began. Forming it promptly, he joined in the action, and contributed greatly to the orderly character of the retreat by his courage and admirable soldiership, seconded by the excellent conduct of the gentlemen composing his command. Imboden and his battery did excellent service on this trying occasion. Bee met Jackson at the head of his brigade, on the position he had first taken, and he began to re-form and Jackson to deploy at the same time. In the mean time I had been waiting with General Beauregard on Lookout Hill for evidence of General McDowell's design. The violence of the firing on the left indicated a battle, but the large bodies of troops reported by chosen scouts to be facing our right kept me in doubt. But n
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. by John D. Imboden, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. Soon after the battle of Bull Run Stonewall Jackson was promoted to major-general, and the Confederate Government having on the 21st of October, 1861, organized the Department of Northern Virginia, under command of General Joseph E. Johnston, it was divided into the Valley District, the Potomac District, and Aquia District, to be commanded respectively by Major-Generals Jackson, Beauregard, and Holmes. Ot region; and if his subordinates had been equal to the task, and there had been no interference from Washington, it is probable the Confederate army would have been driven out of Virginia and Richmond captured by midsummer, 1862. Brigadier-General John D. Imboden, C. S. A. From a photograph. Jackson's little army in the Valley had been greatly reduced during the winter from various causes, so that at the beginning of March he did not have over 5000 men of all arms available for the defen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate retreat from Gettysburg. (search)
The Confederate retreat from Gettysburg. by John D. Imboden, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. Carry me back to Ole Virginny. During the Gettysburg campaign, my command — an independent brigade of cavalry — was engaged, by General Lee's confidential orders, in raids on the left flank of his advancing army, destroying railroad bridges and cutting the canal below Cumberland wherever I could so that I did not reach the field till noon of the last day's battle. I reported direct to General Lee for orders, and was assigned a position to aid in repelling any cavalry demonstration on his rear. None of a serious character being made, my little force took no part in the battle, but were merely spectators of the scene, which transcended in grandeur any that I beheld in any other battle of the war. When night closed the struggle, Lee's army was repulsed. We all knew that the day had gone against us, but the full extent of the disaster was only known in high quarters. The carnage of th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
ade, Brig.-Gen. William E. Jones: 6th Va., Maj. C. E. Flournoy; 7th Va., Lieut.-Col. Thomas Marshall; 11th Va., Col. L. L. Lomax; 35th Va. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. E. V. White. Brigade loss: k, 12; w, 40; m, 6 = 58. Stuart's Horse Artillery, Maj. R. F. Beckham: Va. Battery, Capt. James Breathed; Va. Battery, Capt. R. P. Chew; Maryland Battery, Capt. W. H. Griffin; S. C. Battery, Capt. J. F. Hart; Va. Battery, Capt. W. M. McGregor; Va. Battery, Capt. M. N. Moorman. Imboden's Command, Brig.-Gen. John D. Imboden: 18th Va. Cav., Col. George W. Imboden; 62d Va. (mounted infantry), Col. George H. Smith; Va. Partisan Rangers, Capt. John H. McNeill; Va. Battery, Capt. J. H. McClanahan. According to the reports of brigade and other subordinate commanders the total loss of the Confederate Army was 2592 killed, 12,709 wounded, and 5150 captured or missing =20,451. Several of the reports indicate that many of the missing were killed or wounded. Rolls on file in the office of the Adjutant-Gener
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of New Market, Va., May 15th, 1864. (search)
The battle of New Market, Va., May 15th, 1864. by John D. Imboden, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. Cadet of the Virginia Military Institute in marching outfit. On the retreat of General Lee from Gettysburg, in July, 1863, he was not pursued by the Federal army into the Shenandoah Valley. After resting there and recuperating his shattered forces for a short time he crossed to the east side of the Blue Ridge. On the 21st of July, 1863, he assigned me to the command of the Valley District, comprising the country west of the Blue Ridge and as far south as James River in Botetourt County. This district had been constituted a separate territorial command in 1861-62 for Stonewall Jackson, and its boundaries were not changed during the war. When I took the command it was so little menaced that I had only my own brigade of cavalry and mounted infantry and General Gabriel C. Wharton's infantry brigade, McClanahan's six-gun battery, McNeill's Rangers, and two small battalions of cava
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at New Market, Va., May 15, 1864. (search)
issing == 831. The Confederate Army.--Major-General John C. Breckinridge. Echols's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John Echols: 22d Va.,----; 23d Va.,----; 26th Va.,----. Wharton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. G. C. Wharton: 45th Va.,----; 51st Va.,----; 30th Va. Battalion,----. Cadet Corps (four companies from the Virginia Military Institute), Lieut.-Col. Scott Ship. Artillery, McLaughlin's Battalion, Maj. William McLaughlin; Cadet Battery Section, Lieut. C. H. Minge. Cavalry, Imboden's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John D. Imboden: 62d Va. (mounted infantry), Col. George I. Smith; 23d Va., Col. Robert White; 18th Va., Col. George W. Imboden; Gilmor's Maryland Battalion, Maj. Harry Gilmor; Davis's Maryland Battalion (detachment), Maj. Sturgis Davis; Partisan Rangers, Capt. John H. McNeill; McClanahan's Va. Battery, Capt. J. H. McClanahan. In an address delivered at the anniversary celebration of the battle General Echols referred to the bravery of a company of Missourians who were in the battle. They were
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Lynchburg expedition. (search)
,----; 1st N. Y. (Veteran),----; 21st N. Y.,----; 1st Md., P. H. B.,----. Second Brigade, Col. John E. Wynkoop: 15th N. Y.,----; 20th Pa.,----; 22d Pa.,----. Second cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. William W. Averell. First Brigade, Col. James N. Schoonmaker: 8th Ohio, Col. Alpheus S. Moore; 14th Pa.,----. Second Brigade, Col. John H. Oley: 34th Ohio (mounted infantry),----; 3d W. Va.,----; 5th W. Va.,----; 7th W. Va.,----. Third Brigade, Col. William H. Powell: 1st W. Va.,----; 2d W. Va.,----. Hunter started on this expedition with about 8500 men of all arms. After uniting with Crook and Averell at Staunton his force was about 18,000 strong. The Confederate Army. The forces resisting Hunter's advance were commanded by Generals W. E. Jones (killed at Piedmont), J. C. Vaughn, John McCausland, W. L. Jackson, and J. D. Imboden. General John C. Breckinridge's division and Jubal A. Early's corps arrived at Lynchburg in time to defend the place against Hunter's meditated attack.
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