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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 20 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 18 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 18 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Indians or search for Indians in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. General Rousseau's expedition. (search)
he river was a beautiful sight. The long array of horsemen winding between the green islands and taking a serpentine course across the ford — their arms flashing back the rays of the burning sun, and guidons gaily fluttering along the column, formed a bright picture, recalling the days of romance, and contrasting strongly with the stern hardships and vivid realities of the every-day life on the duty march. This ford is one crossed by General Jackson during his campaign against the Creek Indians. Without further delay, the march was resumed. The day was very hot and intolerably dusty. A few miles from the river we reached an iron furnace which was being operated for the rebel authorities. It was thoroughly destroyed by General Rousseau's orders. After a march of fifteen miles a halt was made for about two hours to feed and rest. The heat of the day was very trying, particularly upon the artillery horses, and finding that to retain both guns would impede the march and preven
in the honorable custody of a peaceful ordnance sergeant, and seized and made prisoners of war, the very garrisons sent to protect your people against negroes and Indians. Long before any overt act was committed by the, to you, hateful Lincoln Government.you tried to force Kentucky and Missouri into rebellion in spite of themseldoors upon the mission of subjugation. You say we seized upon your forts and arsenals, and made prisoners of the garrisons sent to protect us against negroes and Indians. The truth is, we expelled by force of arms insolent intruders, and took possession of our own forts and arsenals, to resist your claim to dominion over masters, slaves and Indians, all of whom are to this day, with unanimity unexampled in the history of the world, warring against your attempts to become their masters. You say that we tried to force Missouri and Kentucky into rebellion in spite of themselves. The truth is, my Government, from the beginning of this struggle to this hour,
, and are likely to stand this winter, however, with these Indians, there is no manner of danger to the frontier settlements ere have been no active operations, there being no hostile Indians, except a few straggling thieves, east of the Missouri riv should secure the United States against the raids of such Indians, or should permit the United States forces to pursue into ming into the territory of the United States to trade with Indians, whether hostile to us or not, who live south of the Britia copy of that letter and a copy of trade regulations with Indians, which I have heretofore forwarded, and which I deem necesn and decent. These are the first lessons to be taught to Indians. Religious instruction will come afterward in its naturrespect and kindness. The peace which will be made with Indians, under the instructions I have given to Generals Sully anditary authorities be left to themselves to deal with these Indians, and to regulate the trading with the Indian tribes withou
on him, but he repelled them, assisted by some well directed shots from Jones' battery. About this time a large body of Indians, who we ascertained afterward had been out hunting for me came up on my rear. I brought a piece of Jones' battery to than camp with both companies of my command, in accordance with orders, for the purpose of destroying the property of said Indians, and although several other companies were at work destroying the property of the Indians my two companies destroyed somin front of the skirmishing line and fired three rounds of spherical case shot, killing five or six and wounding several Indians. I was then ordered to move to the left, with instructions to head them off and drive them towards the right. I advanct dusk two of the pickets, members of company D, Second Minnesota cavalry, were surprised and killed by a small party of Indians, which is the only casualty of consequence which occurred in the command during the engagement. The complete success