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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. 8 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 2 0 Browse Search
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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 2 (search)
ments, bed and bedding, etc. I very much fear this will be a most ruinously expensive business, and I wish to heaven I was out of it; but it was absolutely necessary to procure these things, and I could get them cheaper here than in New Orleans, besides my intention of spending no longer time than absolutely necessary in that city. I shall leave here to-night or early to-morrow morning for down the river, and may probably spend a day at Louisville, where I understand that Elizabeth Elizabeth Ingraham, wife of Alfred Ingraham, and sister of Lieutenant Meade. and her children are staying. I also expect to overtake there a young officer of our corps, on his way to Texas, whom I find by the books at the hotels is just one day ahead of me. I shall then proceed immediately to New Orleans, and if there is not a vessel going soon to this place, I will go to some place in the neighborhood of New Orleans known to be healthy, and wait there till one should be ready. At New Orleans I expect
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 18., Turell Tufts and his family connections. (search)
all, so called, and in 1824 by John Howe. For several years following her husband's death there is evidence that Elizabeth Ingraham occupied three-quarters of some house and the remainder was occupied by others at the same time, namely, Joseph Burrage and Benjamin Tufts. Mrs. Ingraham belonged to that band of charitable and kind-hearted gentlewomen of Medford who regularly supplied Marm Betty, the poor and aged schoolmistress of Medford, with food. Mrs. Ingraham sent on Thursdays. MaMrs. Ingraham sent on Thursdays. Marm Betty had a room in the old bakery, as we knew it. At that time there was a small door on the south side, of ordinary size, close to the east end. Mrs. Ingraham, as a woman of means, was probably a good business woman for investments, or she Mrs. Ingraham, as a woman of means, was probably a good business woman for investments, or she had the advice of her son, Turell Tufts, who was well versed in town affairs. A broadside of the town expenses, when such were printed on a single sheet, shows in the miscellaneous account, In this same account there was paid to Turell Tufts one