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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 14: Poe (search)
itude. As time has passed and we have come to know more about Poe's life, it has become more and more evident that the view of his character held by Griswold and those who sided with him was unduly harsh, It is due to Griswold, however, to say that his account of Poe's life, though inaccurate at many points and jaundiced throughout, is more to be relied on than is now commonly assumed. For exposing most of Griswold's inaccuracies we are indebted to Poe's English biographer, the late John H. Ingram. though it remains clear, nevertheless, that Poe was not without regrettable traits and serious weaknesses. It is plain, first of all, that he was abnormally proud and sensitive and impulsive; it is equally plain that he was thoroughly undignified and ungenerous in his attacks on certain of his contemporaries who had aroused his envy or incurred his dislike. We have already noted that he was not invariably accurate of statement, especially in matters pertaining peculiarly to himself; w
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
0 Hume, David, 399 Hume, Martin, 129 Hunter, General, 155 Hutchinson, Thomas, 104, 106, 113 Hyacinth, the, 174 Hymns to the gods, 290 Hyperion, 34 Ichabod, 51 Iduna and other stories, 388 Ike and his friends, 155 Iliad, 2 Illinois monthly magazine, the, 163 In a cellar, 373 In an Atelier, 242 Independent, the, 280 Independent chronicle, 178 Independent journal, the, 180 Indian fairy tales, 357 n. Individuality, 344 Industrious Apprentice, 214 Ingram, John H., 62 n. In Harbor (Hayne), 311 In the Harbor (Longfellow), 40, 228 Inland voyage, an, 6, 9 Inman, Henry, 174 In re Walt Whitman, 266 n. In School days, 241 In state, 281 Internal evidences of the genuineness of the Gospels, 210 In the midst of life. See Tales of soldiers and Civilians In the Tennessee Mountains, 388, 389 Introduction to the history of the revolt of the American colonies, 108 Io Triumphe, 286 Irene, 38 Irving, Washington, 10, 22, 32, 33
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cruise of the Nashville. (search)
wo hundred or one thousand four hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; Charles M. Fauntleroy, First Lieutenant; John W. Bennett, Second Lieutenant; William C. Whittle, Third Lieutenant; John H. Ingram, Master; Jno. L. Ancrum, Surgeon; Richard Taylor, Paymaster; James Hood, Chief Engineer; Assistant Murray, and two others, and the following Midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton,—— Thomas and —— McClintock. Early in the fall of 1861 she ran out of Charleston, touched at Bermuda for coal and soon arrived at Southampton, England, having ] captured and burned en route the American ship Harvey Birch. Here we remained until the latte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
bout twelve or fourteen hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood; Assistant Murray and two others, and the following midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton, ——Thomas, and ——McClintock. On the night of October 21, 1861, she ran out of Charleston and touched at Bermuda. After stopping there a few days for coal, she headed across the Atlantic, and on November 19th captured in the entrance of the British channel the ship
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
bout twelve or fourteen hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood; Assistant Murray and two others, and the following midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton, ——Thomas, and ——McClintock. On the night of October 21, 1861, she ran out of Charleston and touched at Bermuda. After stopping there a few days for coal, she headed across the Atlantic, and on November 19th captured in the entrance of the British channel the ship