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t by displaying the U. S. flag, with the Union down, from the same staff, and below the confederate flag. Col. A. Duryea was placed in command of the camp near Fortress Monroe, by Major-General Butler.--(Doc. 202.) The Twentieth N. Y. Volunteer Regiment left New York city for the seat of war.--(Doc. 203.) The First Regiment of Virginia Volunteers, Col. Kelly, stationed at Wheeling, Va., left that place at 7 A. M., and moved towards Grafton. After their departure, the Sixteenth Ohio Regiment, 1,000 strong, stationed at Bellaire, Ohio, under command of Col. Irvine, crossed the Ohio and followed Col. Kelly's command. The Fourteenth Ohio Regiment, Col. Steadman, crossed the Ohio, at Marietta, about the same time, and occupied Parkersburg. At midnight the rebels evacuated Grafton in great haste.--(Doc. 204.) The Washington Artillery of New Orleans, La., left that city for Virginia. Previous to their departure, they were addressed by the Rev. Dr. Palmer.--(Doc. 205.)
Ky., between the Union forces of Colonel Lilly, commanding two squadrons of the Fourteenth Kentucky cavalry, and the rebels. The latter, under Colonel Scott, after their failure to take Lexington and Paris, commenced beating a hasty retreat for Irvine. They were hotly pursued by the Federal forces. Skirmishing commenced at or near Winchester, and continued for a long distance. Irvine is some thirty miles from Winchester, where the Fourteenth were stationed. The rebels came upon them unawarIrvine is some thirty miles from Winchester, where the Fourteenth were stationed. The rebels came upon them unawares, but this not discomfit them in the least, nor did they stop to calculate how far they were outnumbered, which they were, fully four to one. As soon as the attack was made by the rebels, the Fourteenth was ready for them, and gave them such a battle as they have cause long to remember. Every assault was bravely met and withstood, and notwithstanding the enemy gained some little advantage at one point, and captured some of the Nationals, the tide of battle was soon turned again, and the Nati
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), Casualties in the First New-Jersey cavalry. (search)
l. Kilpatrick, was composed of his own regiment, the Second New-York cavalry, (Harris's Light,) First Maine cavalry, Col. Douty, and Tenth New-York cavalry, Lieut.-Col. Irvine. The Second brigade was commanded by Colonel Wyndham, and consisted of his own regiment, the First New-Jersey cavalry, First Maryland cavalry, Lieut.-Col. of his right leg. Gen. Gregg and staff advanced and ordered Col. Kilpatrick to support Col. Wyndham on the right. As the first regiment, Tenth New-York, Lieut-Col. Irvine, emerged from the woods, they charged upon the rebels formed near the railroad, and were closely followed by the Harris Light cavalry, (Second New-York,) Lieand rising in echelon; was ordered to charge and drive the enemy from the hill and hold it, when the whole line was threatened by a superior force. It was here Col. Irvine was seen to fall. Col. Davies, of the Harris Light cavalry, was ordered to attack the enemy in flank — their movements were checked by two columns of the enemy
ell known. You have now shown, under the most adverse circumstances, that the great mass of the people of Western Virginia are true and loyal to that beneficent Government under which we and our fathers have lived so long. A brief and stirring address to his soldiers was issued simultaneously with the above; and, both being read to those in Camp Carlile that evening, the 1st Virginia, 1,100 strong, Col. Kelly, crossed to Wheeling early next morning, closely followed by the 16th Ohio, Col. Irvine. The 14th Ohio, Col. Steedman, crossed simultaneously, and quietly occupied Parkersburg, the terminus of the Northwestern branch of the Baltimore and Ohio road. A rebel force, then holding Grafton, which connected the branch aforesaid with the main or Wheeling division of the railroad, had meditated a descent on Wheeling; but, finding themselves anticipated and outnumbered, they obstructed and destroyed the railroad west of them, so that the Unionists did not reach Grafton till the morn
posed of by lottery, 105; Georgia defies the Indian laws, and hangs Tassells, 106; treaties made with those of Kansas, 235. Ingersoll, Charles J., of Pa., reports in favor of Annexation, 171; extract from speech in 1845, 186. Ingersoll, Joseph R., of Pa., speech at the Philadelphia Peace meeting, 363. Iowa, diminished Republican vote in, 300-301. Iredell, James, of N. C., explains the omission of the word slave in the Constitution, 48. iron, product of, pig and wright, 23. Irvine, Col., crosses into West Virginia, 521. Iverson, Alf., of Ga., fire-eating speech of, 373. J. Jackson, Andrew, contrasted with Calhoun; their early life; are chosen President and Vice-President, in 1828, etc., 88-9; he advocates the Protective system, 89; is reflected in 1832, 93; his orders to Gen. Scott and instructions to the Collector of Charleston, 94; is strikingly contrasted with Buchanan; his Proclamation, 95; he anticipates and refutes one of Jeff. Davis's manifestoes; appe
ong the incidents of the engagement my command took several prisoners, among whom was Lieutenant-Colonel Boone, of the Mississippi regiment, taken personally by Mr. Irvine, of my regiment; and since said prisoner's confinement in the Capitol at Washington city, Mr. Irvine, in company with Hon. Morton S. Wilkinson, United States SeMr. Irvine, in company with Hon. Morton S. Wilkinson, United States Senator from Minnesota, visited him, when he promptly recognized Mr. Irvine as his captor, and thanked him very cordially for his humane treatment and kindness to him as a prisoner. I deem it but just that this fact should be officially known, as Lieutenant-Colonel Boone was an officer of the highest rank taken in the battle. ThMr. Irvine as his captor, and thanked him very cordially for his humane treatment and kindness to him as a prisoner. I deem it but just that this fact should be officially known, as Lieutenant-Colonel Boone was an officer of the highest rank taken in the battle. The humble part which I have performed as an officer commanding one of the regiments of your brigade, individually and otherwise, is now left to you and those commanding the division. Respectfully, W. A. Gorman, Col. First Regiment, Minnesota. Supplement to the official report of Col. Gorman, of the First regiment, Minnesota
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 8: from the battle of Bull Run to Paducah--Kentucky and Missouri. 1861-1862. (search)
Ohio, Colonel Harris. Cynthiana, Kentucky.--Thirty-fifth Ohio, Colonel Vandever. Nicholasville, Kentucky.--Twenty-first Ohio, Colonel Norton; Thirty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Bradley. Big Hill.--Seventeenth Ohio, Colonel Connell. Colesburg.--Twenty-fourth Illinois, Colonel Hecker. Elizabethtown, Kentucky.--Nineteenth Illinois, Colonel Turchin. Owensboroa or Henderson.--Thirty-first Indiana, Colonel Cruft; Colonel Edwards, forming Rock Castle; Colonel Boyle, Harrodsburg; Colonel Barney, Irvine; Colonel Hazzard, Burksville; Colonel Haskins, Somerset. And, in order to conclude this subject, I also add copies of two telegraphic dispatches, sent for General McClellan's use about the same time, which are all the official letters received at his headquarters, as certified by the Adjutant-General, L. Thomas, in a letter of February 1, 1862, in answer to an application of my brother, Senator John Sherman, and on which I was adjudged insane: Louisville, November 8, 10 P. M. To Ge
00 Indian Trust Fund, D. 5 Indians. the Catawba tribes tender to Gov. Pickens, D. 16; notice of, D. 43; stationed at Harper's Ferry, D. 77; Cherokees in the Southern army, P. 126, 127 Ingraham, D. P., Judge, D. 40 Ingraham Henry, D. 27 Ink, Blood, and Tears, the taking of Fort Sumter, P. 90 Ireland, union with England, Int. 16 Irish Regular, anecdote of an, P. 57 Irishmen, among the rebels, D. 103 Ironton, Mo., lead seized at, D. 76 Irvine, Colonel, D. 83 Irving, Jim, notice of, P. 150 Ithaca, N. Y., volunteers from, D. 56 It is great for our Country to die, P. 105 Ives, T. P., commissioned in the revenue service, D. 71 J Jacobus, J. J., Mrs., P. 136 Jackson, Claiborne F., Gov. of Mo., his reply to Cameron, D. 30; secession sympathies of, D. 55; calls for 50,000 troops, D. 101; evacuates Jefferson City, Mo., D. 104; notices of, D. 47, 107; proclamation, June 12, Dec. 363 Jackson, Andrew, The T
is line was a work of considerable difficulty and delicacy. In this work, as indeed on every occasion during the entire affair, Lieut.-Col. Colville, Major Adams, and Adjutant Peller rendered efficient aid. I regret here to note the loss of Corporal Irvine, Corporal Irvine has since returned on parole. of company D, who went by my orders to reconnoitre a point in front of our right, where we could hear the sound of intrenching tools. He did not return, and probably fell into the hands of tCorporal Irvine has since returned on parole. of company D, who went by my orders to reconnoitre a point in front of our right, where we could hear the sound of intrenching tools. He did not return, and probably fell into the hands of the enemy. Finding that we were about four hundred yards from the rifle-pits of the enemy, and exposed to his batteries in the front and flank, I sent to the rear and procured spades and shovels, and caused pits to be dug and slight embankments made to protect the men on the following day. The precaution was a fortunate one, as during the following day we had to endure a constant fire from the enemy's artillery in front, and an enfilading fire from the right. This at times was very severe, a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Kirby Smith's Kentucky campaign. (search)
en no treachery, no gross negligence nor disobedience of orders, no flagrant breach of duty. General Smith had withdrawn his forces from their position in front of Covington, with the view to cooperate with General Bragg, when, on the 24th of September, he received information that the Federal General, Morgan, had evacuated Cumberland Gap on the 17th instant, and was seeking an outlet by Manchester and West Liberty to the Little Sandy. Brigadier-General Morgan was at once dispatched to Irvine, with a regiment of cavalry, with orders to get in the enemy's front, and destroying supplies and felling timber along his line of march, retard his progress as much as possible. At the same time General Heth was ordered to Mount Sterling, whither General Smith proceeded the next day. There he learned that Morgan had made his escape, having passed West Liberty. From the declarations of many citizens about Lexington, who professed to know the country well, General Smith was led to believe t
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