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Chapter 9: the Mexican War. General Taylor occupies Corpus Christi. horsemanship of the Texans. Taylor moves to the Rio Grande. hostilities by the Mexicans. battle of Palo Alto. Resaca. volunteering. General Taylor's letter in regard to General Johnston. Asks him to join the army. he goes on horseback from Galveston and joins the army. his letters from point Isabel, detailing military operations. elected Colonel of first Texas Riflemen. pride in his Regiment. disbanded. his bitter disappointment. anecdote, the Texan father. General Johnston's letter describing the battle of Monterey. letter from the Hon. Jefferson Davis explaining and describing it. General Johnston's extraordinary peril. Rallies the Ohio Regiment. General Hooker's account of it. incident with General Hamer. complimented and recommended for Brigadier-General. overlooked. Jefferson Davis. his account of an incident in the capitulation of Monterey, and estimate of General Johnston's ch
and wounded. During the skirmish a new battery which the rebels had erected during Sunday night, and which interfered with the working party of the Nationals, was most effectually silenced and the guns dismantled. The Santa Fe, New Mexico mail, arrived at Kansas City, Mo., with dates to the twelfth inst. Col. Slough and Gen. Canby formed a junction at Galisteo on the eleventh. Major Duncan, who was in command of Gen. Canby's advance-guard, encountered a large party of Texans and routed them. Major Duncan was slightly wounded. The Texans were thirty miles south of Galisteo, in full flight from the territory.--Official Despatch. The rebel steamer Ella Warley (Isabel) arrived at Port Royal, S. C., in charge of Lieut. Gibson and a prize crew, she having been captured by the Santiago de Cuba, one hundred miles north of Abaco. Forts Jackson and St. Philip on the Mississippi River, below New Orleans, surrendered to the National fleet under Flag-Officer Farragut.--(Doc. 149.)
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 13: the siege and evacuation of Fort Sumter. (search)
honors. Two private soldiers of the company erected a board at the head of his grave. Charleston Mercury, May 2, 1861. When the flag was lowered, at the close of the salute, the garrison, in full dress, left the fort, and embarked on the Isabel, the band playing Yankee Doodle. When Major Anderson and his officers left the sallyport, it struck up Hail to the Chief. The last one who retired was Surgeon Crawford, who attended poor Gallway until the latest moment possible. Soon afterwarde civil war--Major Anderson, bearing the title of Major-General in the Armies of the United States, again raised that tattered flag over all that remained of Fort Sumter--a heap of ruins. See picture of the ruins on the preceding page. The Isabel lay under the battered walls of the fort, waiting for a favoring tide, until Monday morning, April 15, 1861. when she conveyed the garrison to the Baltic, then commanded by Captain Fletcher. The insurgent soldiers had been so impressed with the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.48 (search)
s the Sir Kenneth in Sir Walter Scott's Talisman. He died in 1219. He married Maud, daughter of Hugh Kivilioch, Earl of Chester. Their second daughter, VI.--Isabel, married Robert de Brus, Lord of Annandale, the fourth in descent from Robert de Brus, a noble Norman knight, who distinguished himself on the field of Hastings. assistance of King Henry III. On the death of Queen Margaret, in 1290, he claimed the throne of Scotland. He died in 1295, aged eighty-five. In 1244 he married Isabel, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, third Earl of Gloucester. Their eldest son, VIII.--Robert Bruce, Lord of Annandale, born about 1245, accompanied King Edward I e of Aberbrothwick January 13, 1446. His third son, by his wife Lady Mariota Dunbar, was V.--Sir Walter Lindsay, of Beufort and Panbride, who married secondly Isabel, daughter of William, Lord Livingston, and by her had a son, VI.--Sir David Lindsay, of Edzell and Beufort, who died 1527, and had by his wife Catherine, daugh
were received then, as now, with indifference. The ladies of the time of Louis IX. of France. like the first gentleman in Europe of nearly six centuries later, had their dresses stitched upon them to secure a tight fit without creases. Lord Alvanley's fat friend would stand for two hours like a royal Turveydrop, while the wrinkles were cut out of his coat and the seams taken up by fine-drawing. The introduction of bones and metal into the female breastplate is credited to the court of Isabel of Bavaria, about 1417, and the illiberal chronicler has suggested that the device was padded to conceal deformity, and stiffened to act as a scoliosis brace. Catharine de Medici introduced the fashion into France. The Emperor Joseph II. proscribed the corset and tried to discourage its use by arraying malefactors in it, much as the English authorities endeavored to set a seal of condemnation upon cotton goods by hanging criminals in cotton shirts. The dresses in one loose length, gir
Doc. 66. escape of the Harriet Lane. off Galveston, Texas, May 5, 1864. The late United States revenue cutter Harriet Lane, in company with three other notorious blockade running steamers-viz.: Matagorda, alias Alice, Isabel, and one whose name is unknown, has escaped from the harbor of Galveston. After being so closely watched for the past fifteen months, her escape, in company with the other steamers, was effected on the night of the thirtieth ultimo, during a squall, in this wise:owing overboard her whole deck load of cotton, some three hundred bales, after doing which the crew went to work tearing up the hurricane deck to burn in her furnaces; but again the pursuer and pursued separated, and during the night the Lane and Isabel were lost sight of, about thirty miles off the west coast of Louisiana, near Vermilion bayou, and the next day at dark the other two were lost to sight, owing to a head wind springing up, lessening the speed of the Katahdin some two knots, and en
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 2: a Keats manuscript (search)
s lines. It is a fortunate thing that, in the uncertain destiny of all literary manuscripts, this characteristic document should have been preserved for us. It will be remembered that Keats himself once wrote in a letter that his fondest prayer, next to that for the health of his brother Tom, would be that some child of his brother George should be the first American poet. This letter, printed by Milnes, was written Oct. 29, 1818. George Keats died about 1851, and his youngest daughter, Isabel, who was thought greatly to resemble her uncle John, both in looks and genius, died sadly at the age of seventeen. It is pleasant to think that we have, through the care exercised by this Americanized brother, an opportunity of coming into close touch with the mental processes of that rare genius which first imparted something like actual color to English words. To be brought thus near to Keats suggests that poem by Browning where he compares a moment's interview with one who had seen Shel
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 2: school days in Hartford, 1824-1832. (search)
, 1826, Dr. Beecher resigned his pastorate in Litchfield to accept a call to the Hanover Street Church, Boston, Mass. In a letter to her grandmother Foote at Guilford, dated Hartford, March 4, 1826, Harriet writes:-- You have probably heard that our home in Litchfield is broken up. Papa has received a call to Boston, and concluded to accept, because he could not support his family in Litchfield. He was dismissed last week Tuesday, and will be here (Hartford) next Tuesday with mamma and Isabel. Aunt Esther will take Charles and Thomas to her house for the present. Papa's salary is to be $2,000 and $500 settlement. I attend school constantly and am making some progress in my studies. I devote most of my attention to Latin and to arithmetic, and hope soon to prepare myself to assist Catherine in the school. This breaking up of the Litchfield home led Harriet, under her father's advice, to seek to connect herself with the First Church of Hartford. Accordingly, accompanied
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 4 (search)
ines. It is a fortunate thing that, in the uncertain destiny of all literary manuscripts, this characteristic document should have been preserved for us. It will be remembered that Keats himself once wrote in a letter that his fondest prayer, next to that for the health of his brother Tom, would be that some child of his brother George should be the first American poet. This letter, printed by Milnes, was written October 29, 1818. George Keats died about 1851, and his youngest daughter, Isabel, who was thought greatly to resemble her uncle John, both in looks and genius, died sadly at the age of seventeen. It is pleasant to think that we have, through the care exercised by this American brother, an opportunity of coming into close touch with the mental processes of that rare genius which first imparted something like actual color to English words. To be brought thus near to Keats suggests that poem by Browning where he speaks of a moment's interview with one who had seen Shelle
amb. who received such license. His wife was Isabel; but they left no posterity. Chester, Mrs.,. 22 Jan. 1715-16; Nehemiah, bap. 14 Ap. 1717; Isabel, bap. 25 Jan. 1718-19, m. Jonathan Winship 1 Oap. 21 Jan. 1732-3; Hannah, bap. 20 July 1740; Isabel, b. 18 June 1742; ,Jonathan, b. 30 Aug. 1744, rs; but their names are given as Elizabeth (or Isabel), and Mary. Mr. Dunster, in his will, speaks dward (2), had a grant of land in 1645. By w. Isabel (Mitchell calls her Elizabeth), he had Mary, m and 1662. Mr. Jakson had no children. His w. Isabel d. 12 Feb. 1661, and he m. Elizabeth, wid. of nce, b. 5 Nov. 1657; Joshua, b. 15 Sept. 1659; Isabel, d. 1661; Sarah, b. 10 June 1662. John the f.homas, and two dau. not named, one of whom was Isabel, w. of Francis Whitmore, and the other prob. m. Jacob Eliot 9 January 1654-5. Wilkinson, Isabel, a widow, was here early, and had several gran; Esther, b. 1 Jan. 1739, d. unm. 1 May 1789; Isabel, b. 2 Feb. 1743, d. unm. 18 Nov. 1763. Edwar[9 more...]
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