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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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osing about twenty-three acres sloping down from each end to a stream in the center. When the stockade was built a number of trees were left inside, but the prisoners soon cut these down for fuel and for shelter, and then dug out the stumps and even the roots. Wood was also furnished. Various officers commanded during the few months it was open, and there was considerable conflict of authority until General Winder was placed in charge of all prisons east of the Mississippi. Lieutenant-Colonel John F. Iverson held command of the prison, and his kindness and humanity have A Confederate prison in Petersburg, April, 1865 This prison in Petersburg was known as Castle Thunder. When this photograph was taken, in April, 1865, for many months Confederate sentries had been pacing up and down where the Union sentry now stands with his gun at support arms. For months a succession of Union prisoners had gazed out longingly through the bars, listening to the Union guns which day after da
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
afterward served in the army of Tennessee from a short time after the battle of Shiloh until after July, 1864, when it was sent to the Georgia coast. It participated also under Joe Johnston in the final campaign in the Carolinas. Its first colonel, John K. Jackson, became brigadier-general before Shiloh. His successors in the colonelcy were Samuel W. Mangham, Wm. F. Black, Wm. T. Beach and Charles P. Daniel. The lieutenant-colonels that succeeded Thomas Beall were Charles R. Day and John F. Iverson. Maj. Wm. L. Salisbury was followed by Charles P. Daniel, D. H. Ansley and W. B. Hundley. Captain Platt was succeeded by D. H. Ansley; Hull by H. P. Steeney; Pottle by Wm. B. Hundley, afterward major; Lang by John F. Kidder; Sears by John J-. Hurt; King by Stephen R. Weston. The Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth regiments were twelve months troops. At the expiration of their term they re-enlisted for the war. Thus in the first four months of 1861 there were five twelve months infa