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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 593 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 106 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 90 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 46 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 35 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 32 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 11, 1862., [Electronic resource] 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874.. You can also browse the collection for Andrew Jackson or search for Andrew Jackson in all documents.

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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
n, alleging that by a rule of his Department, passports are not granted to colored persons. In marked contrast are the laws of Massachusetts, recognizing such persons as citizens; and also those words of gratitude and commendation, in which General Jackson, after the battle of New Orleans, addressed the black soldiers who had shared, with a noble enthusiasm, the perils and glory of their white fellow-citisens. Fourthly.—The Post-Office Department, in a formal communication with regard to whate battle which determined the future career of the successful candidate; and it may be reckoned among the important events which led to the grand crisis that was looming up in the future. There has been no instance, perhaps, since the case of Gen. Jackson, in which any public man has been chosen for a high political station who became the object of such bitter assaults by the Press. The vituperation heaped upon him from every quarter of the Union was without a parallel. But Mr. Sumner preserv
enly put forth by the friends of Slavery at the South. Thirdly.—Mr. Clayton, as Secretary of State, in defiance of justice, and in mockery of the principles of the Declaration of Independence, has refused a national passport to a free-colored citizen, alleging that by a rule of his Department, passports are not granted to colored persons. In marked contrast are the laws of Massachusetts, recognizing such persons as citizens; and also those words of gratitude and commendation, in which General Jackson, after the battle of New Orleans, addressed the black soldiers who had shared, with a noble enthusiasm, the perils and glory of their white fellow-citisens. Fourthly.—The Post-Office Department, in a formal communication with regard to what are called incendiary publications, has stated that the Postmaster-General leaves the whole subject to the discretion of Postmasters under the authority of State Governments. Here is no word of indignation at the idea that the mails of the United S
XVIII. Thus ended the battle which determined the future career of the successful candidate; and it may be reckoned among the important events which led to the grand crisis that was looming up in the future. There has been no instance, perhaps, since the case of Gen. Jackson, in which any public man has been chosen for a high political station who became the object of such bitter assaults by the Press. The vituperation heaped upon him from every quarter of the Union was without a parallel. But Mr. Sumner preserved through it all the most admirable dignity of behavior, and the completest serenity of spirit. Neither strangers, nor the most intimate friends, could discover that his spirits were even ruffled; and to reply to any of the assaults made upon him, however malignant, or the prophecies of evil omen which were so profusely uttered, was the last thing he thought of. Indeed, through life he made it a rule never to reply to attacks, unless it became necessary to fortify by
anguage and manner; since I have been charged with openly declaring my purpose to violate the Constitution, and to break the oath which I have taken at that desk, I shall be pardoned for showing simply how a few plain words will put all this down. Xlvi. The Senators, who have been so swift in misrepresentation and in assault upon me as disloyal to the Constitution, deserve to be exposed, and it shall be done. Now, sir, I begin by adopting as my guide the authoritative words of Andrew Jackson, in 1832, in his memorable veto of the Bank of the United States. To his course, at that critical time, were opposed the authority of the Supreme Court and his oath to support the Constitution. Here is his triumphant reply: If the opinion of the Supreme Court covers the whole ground of this act, it ought not to control the co-ordinate authorities of this Government. The Congress, the Executive and the Court, must each for itself be guided by its own opinion of the Constitution.
Xlvi. The Senators, who have been so swift in misrepresentation and in assault upon me as disloyal to the Constitution, deserve to be exposed, and it shall be done. Now, sir, I begin by adopting as my guide the authoritative words of Andrew Jackson, in 1832, in his memorable veto of the Bank of the United States. To his course, at that critical time, were opposed the authority of the Supreme Court and his oath to support the Constitution. Here is his triumphant reply: If the opinion of the Supreme Court covers the whole ground of this act, it ought not to control the co-ordinate authorities of this Government. The Congress, the Executive and the Court, must each for itself be guided by its own opinion of the Constitution. Each public officer, who takes an oath to support the Constitution, swears that he will support it as he understands it, and not as it is understood by others. It is as much the duty of the House of Representatives, of the Senate, and of the Preside
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
gton's army Colored heroes at red Bank Commodore Chauncey's Black sailors Gen. Jackson's Proclamation in 1814 Jackson's Address to Colored troops advantages of Cicited the military services of negroes in the Revolution, and rewarded them. Jackson did the same in the War of 1812. Under both those great captains the negro tragainst Generals Butler and Hunter, he (Mr. Dunn) pointed to the fact that General Jackson employed colored soldiers in the defence of New Orleans and complimented tof men of color. Xlvi. The following proclamation and address of General Andrew Jackson covers the whole ground, and breathes the magnanimous spirit of that he will give you every necessary information on the subject of this address. Andrew Jackson, Major-General commanding.Niles's Register, vol. VII., p. 205. XLVII. the white and colored troops in New Orleans, on Sunday, December 18, 1814, General Jackson's address to the troops was read by Edward Livingston, one of his aids, an
have shown a lamentable amount of ignorance, and an equally lamentable lack of common sense. They know as little of the military history and martial qualities of the African race as they do of their own duties as commanders. All distinguished generals of modern times who have had opportunities to use negro soldiers, have uniformly applauded their subordination, bravery, and powers of endurance. Washington solicited the military services of negroes in the Revolution, and rewarded them. Jackson did the same in the War of 1812. Under both those great captains the negro troops fought so well that they received unstinted praise. Bancroft, in speaking of the battle of Bunker Hill (vol. VII. p. 421, History of United States), says:— Nor should history forget to record that as in the army at Cambridge, so also in this gallant band, the free negroes of the colony had their representatives. For the right of free negroes to bear arms in the public defence was at that day as lit
ullivan to support his almost exhausted troops. It was in repelling these furious onsets that the newly-raised black regiment, under Colonel Green, distinguished itself by deeds of desperate valor. Posted behind a thicket in the valley, they three times drove back the Hessians, who charged repeatedly down the hill to dislodge them. Negroes have always been favorites In referring to Mr. Wickliffe's remarks against Generals Butler and Hunter, he (Mr. Dunn) pointed to the fact that General Jackson employed colored soldiers in the defence of New Orleans and complimented them upon their gallantry and good order. Kentuckians were in that battle with black men. Commodore Perry fought his battles on Lake Erie with the help of black men; and black men, too, fought in the Revolutionary War. Commodores Stringham and Woodhull severally testify to the valuable services of the blacks in the navy, saying they are as brave as any who ever stood at the guns. They fought before Vicksburg, and
Xlvi. The following proclamation and address of General Andrew Jackson covers the whole ground, and breathes the magnanimous spirit of that hero-patriot:— Headquarters, 7th Military District. Mobile, September 21, 1814. To the free colored inhabitants of Louisiana. Through a mistaken policy, you have heretofore been deprived of a participation in the glorious struggle for national rights in which our country is engaged. This no longer shall exist. As sons of freedom, you are nowgiment, pursuing the path of glory, you will, undivided, receive the applause and gratitude of your countrymen. To assure you of the sincerity of my intentions, and my anxiety to engage your invaluable services to our country, I have communicated my wishes to the Governor of Louisiana, who is fully informed as to the manner of enrolment, and will give you every necessary information on the subject of this address. Andrew Jackson, Major-General commanding.Niles's Register, vol. VII., p. 20
XLVII. At the close of a review of the white and colored troops in New Orleans, on Sunday, December 18, 1814, General Jackson's address to the troops was read by Edward Livingston, one of his aids, and the following is the portion addressed:— To the men of color. Soldiers! From the shores of Mobile I collected you to arms,—I invited you to share in the perils, and to divide the glory of your white countrymen. I expected much from you; for I was not uninformed of those qualities which must render you so formidable to an invading foe. I knew that you could endure hunger and thirst, and all the hardships of war. I knew that you loved the land of your nativity, and that, like ourselves, you had to defend all that is most dear to man. But you surpass my hopes. I have found in you, united to these qualities, that noble enthusiasm which impels to great deeds. Soldiers! The President of the United States shall be informed of your conduct on the present occasion; and the vo