Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 6, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for James W. Jackson or search for James W. Jackson in all documents.

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possible to reconcile the patriot and the conservative to greater perfection. He is one of the many in Italy anxious to dissociate national from social revolution; one of those Italians who wanted to conquer their country that they might constitute it, not disorganize it. Precisely because the Baron is the man of order and discipline, he is hated and dreaded by the out-and-out revolutionary party, even more than his great predecessor. The rage with which the journals of Guerrazi and Mazzini fell foul of him, even before Cavour's clay was cold, shows the wisdom of the King's and the nation's choice. Ricasoli is the man, as the anarchists well know, to curb and chastise them. There is something in his cold grey eyes, in his deeply-furrowed face, in his spare, dried up, somewhat gaunt frame, that speaks of undaunted courage and unswerving resolution. He somewhat reminds one of Gen. Jackson, the man whose character the Americans summed up in the single appellation of "Old Hickory."
A good name. --The name of Jackson seems to be gaining an enviable distinction in the present war. First, James W. Jackson, of Alexandria, Va., slew Col. Ellsworth for interfering with a flag, private property, when he knew his own death wouldJames W. Jackson, of Alexandria, Va., slew Col. Ellsworth for interfering with a flag, private property, when he knew his own death would follow. Second, Gov. Jackson, of Missouri, has taken a bold, patriotic stand for the South, against heavy odds. Third, Mrs. Jackson, of Tazewell, Drove Andy Johnson, the traitor, from her hotel, assuring him that money could not purchase her proviGov. Jackson, of Missouri, has taken a bold, patriotic stand for the South, against heavy odds. Third, Mrs. Jackson, of Tazewell, Drove Andy Johnson, the traitor, from her hotel, assuring him that money could not purchase her provisions for such an ingrate Hurrah for the Jacksons!--Fayetteville Ob. ic stand for the South, against heavy odds. Third, Mrs. Jackson, of Tazewell, Drove Andy Johnson, the traitor, from her hotel, assuring him that money could not purchase her provisions for such an ingrate Hurrah for the Jacksons!--Fayetteville Ob.
The battles of Martinsburg. It turns out that Cadwallader of Patterson, (or both, as the case may be,) did not recross the Potomac; but followed Johnston's advanced force, under Gen. Jackson, until it effected a junction with the main body of the Confederate forces a few miles south of Martinsburg. That town is in Berkeley county, upon the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, ten or twelve miles from the Potomac, and twenty miles north of Winchester. The Federalist, according to the most reliabd a considerable force of them would likely arrive in good time to join Gen. Johnston. The reader will be amused with one of the Washington dispatches, published in our columns this morning, of the effect one of Cadwallader's telegrams had on old "Fuss and Feathers." who caused the old Ape to be aroused from his bed to hear the glorious news of the retreat of Jackson! It is exceedingly rich. The whole Cabinet was in the highest spirits upon the following day! How are they by this time?
Ominous. --The St. Louis (Mo.) State Journal relates the following: Just as the conference was about to opened between Governor Jackson and General Lyon, a discharge of electricity from overhanging cloud, struck the pole at the -bey Course, from which was floating Stars and Stripes, rent the flag into ribbon and the pole into splinters. Had such an event occurred in the days of the Cæ it would have been regarded as an abdomen from the gods. Less significant indents have, strange to say, determined issue of battles and the fate of kingdoms.
urg concur, substantially, in the following accounts: On Tuesday last the Yankee forces, numbering near 10,000, while approaching Martinsburg, were met by Col. Jackson's advance, consisting of a portion of Col. Harper's Regiment from Augusta county, about 700 strong, and a squadron of cavalry under Col. Steward. The Federal and a half between the main bodies, with a loss to the enemy estimated at the minimum of 67 killed, 85 wounded, and 53 prisoners; when the firing ceased, and Colonel Jackson fell back slowly to a stronger position nearer Martinsburg, with a loss on his side of three killed and five wounded. Gen. Johnston, being notified, advanced from Winchester with his forces, and reliable reports received yesterday say, that in conjunction with Col. Jackson's force, he three several times repulsed the attacks of Gen. Patterson's entire army of about 20,000 men, and drove him into Martinsburg. Gen. Johnston has since succeeded in throwing his army between Gen. Patt