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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 31 7 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 12 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 9 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
icket to the grounded Indianola, saw this new antagonist coming she only stopped to give the alarm, and fled down the river. The supposed monitor stuck fast a mile or two above the Indianola, but the Confederate officer in charge of the work on board the latter did not wait for an attack, but set fire to the recent prize, which was in great part destroyed. Less than three weeks after, on the 14th of March, Farragut ran the batteries at Port Hudson. In a letter to the editors Rear-Admiral T. A. Jenkins says, in reference to Farragut's plan of an attack on Port Hudson: The great importance, not to say necessity, of co-operation by a part of the military forces, in so far, at the least, as to cause a diversion upon the enemy's rear, was decided upon, whereupon the commanding general (Banks) was conferred with with great frequency, until at last in the early part of March, 1863, it was arranged that a considerable force (8000 or 10,000) of all arms should rendezvous at Baton R
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Union vessels in the Vicksburg operations. (search)
t. Master E. Sells (receiving ship); Great Western, (ordnance boat), Act. V. Lieut. W. F. Hamilton; Judge Torrence, (ordnance boat), Act. V. Lieut. J. F. Richardson; New National, Act. Master A. M. Grant (receiving ship), 1 howitzer; Red Rover, Act. Master W. R. Wells (hospital steamer), 1 gun; Sovereign (storeship, no battery), Act. Master T. Baldwin; William H. Brown (dispatch steamer), Act. V. Lieut. J. A. French. West Gulf squadron: Passage of Port Hudson, March 14th-15th, 1863.--Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut commanding; Capt. Thornton A. Jenkins, Fleet Captain. Hartford (flag-ship), Capt. James S. Palmer; Mississippi, Capt. Melancton Smith; Monongahela, Capt. J. P. McKinstry; Richmond, Com. James Alden; Genesee, Com. W. H. Macomb; Albatross, Lieut.-Com. John E. Hart: Kineo, Lieut.-Com. John Watters. Cooperating vessels of West Gulf Squadron, in Red River, May, 1863: Albatross, Lieut.-Com. John E. Hart; Estrella, Lieut.-Com. A. P. Cooke; Arizona, Act. V. Lieut. Daniel P. Upton.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Through the Wilderness. (search)
rps.--A. S. W. Ferrero's colored division, after a forced march of forty miles, was held in the rear to guard the trains. Longstreet's arrival on the field was known and reported by General Hancock to General Meade at 7 A. M. on the 6th; indeed, it was found that Longstreet was present when, at 5 o'clock, my brigade (of Gibbon's division) was ordered to relieve General Getty. When I advanced I immediately became engaged with Field's division, consisting of Gregg's, Benning's, Law's, and Jenkins's brigades, on the north side of the Orange Plank road. Just before 5 o'clock the right of the line under Sedgwick was attacked by the Confederates, and gradually the firing extended along the whole front. Wadsworth's division fought its way across Hancock's front to the Plank road, and advanced along that road. Hancock pushed forward Birney with his own and Mott's divisions, Gibbon's division supporting, on the left of the Plank road, and soon drove his opponents from their rifle-pits
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 7.51 (search)
ard the Hartford, when the positions of the various vessels were assigned, and the order of the line was arranged. Unfortunately Captain (now Rear-Admiral) Thornton A. Jenkins was absent, his vessel, the Richmond, having been unavoidably delayed at Pensacola, whither she had gone for coal and to escort the monitor Tecumseh. Had h861 when commanding the Merrimac in Hampton Roads. Before he could reach them the line had become straightened, and the leading vessels had passed the fort. Admiral Jenkins, who commanded the Richmond during the fight, writing of this part of the fight, for the use of the present writer, says: During the delay under the guns eaviest powder charge; the forecastle gun's crew were ordered to get their small-arms and fire into her gun-ports; and as previously determined, if Rear-Admiral Thornton A. Jenkins. From a photograph. we came in collision at any time, the orders were to throw gun charges of powder in bags from the fore and main yard-arms down
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Mobile. (search)
n, Captain Percival Drayton. Monitors. Tecumseh, Com. T. A. M. Craven, 2 15-inch guns; Manhattan, Com. J. W. A. Nicholson, 2 15-inch; Winnebago, Com. Thomas H. Stevens, 4 11-inch; Chickasaw, Lieut.-Com. George H. Perkins, 411-inch. Screw-sloops. Hartford (flag-ship), Capt. Percival Drayton, 2 100-pounder Parrott rifles, 1 30-pounder Parrott, 18 9-inch, 3 howitzers; Brooklyn, Capt. James Alden, 2 100-pounder Parrotts, 2 60-pounder rifles, 20 9-inch, 1 howitzer; Richmond, Capt. Thornton A. Jenkins, 1 100-pounder rifle, 1 30-pounder rifle, 18 9-inch, 2 howitzers; Lackawanna, Capt. J. B. Marchand, 1150-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 50-pounder Dahlgren pivot, 2 11-inch, 4 9-inch, 6 howitzers; Monongahela, Com. James H. Strong, 1 150-pounder Parrott, 2 11-inch, 5 32-pounders, 3 howitzers; Ossipee, Com. William E. Le Roy, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 1 11-inch, 6 32-pounders, 2 30-pounder Parrotts, 2 howitzers; Oneida, Com. J. R. M. Mullany, 2 11-inch, pivot, 3 30-pounder Parrotts, 4 32-pou
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The ram Tennessee at Mobile Bay. (search)
trained to believe that history will give him his just meed of praise. The casualties on board the Tennessee were two killed and nine wounded. Her armor was never penetrated, although she was under the heaviest fire for nearly four hours. One solid 15-inch shot struck her shield, at point-blank range, between two of the ports and caused an indentation of about twelve inches, but did not break the iron plating. The Board of Survey appointed by Admiral Farragut, and consisting of Captain T. A. Jenkins, Captain James Alden, Commander W. E. Le Roy, and Chief-Engineer Thomas Williamson, reported in part as follows on the injuries received in the action, by the Tennessee. On the port side of the casemate the armor is also badly damaged from shot. On that side nearly amidship of the casemate, and between the two broadside guns, a 15-inch solid shot knocked a hole through the armor and backing, leaving on the inside an undetached mass of oak and pine splinters, about three by four
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
ned earlier if a sufficient number of troops had been sent to accompany the gun-boats in the first instance, but it seems seldom to have been realized that these expeditions would be comparatively fruitless unless conducted as combined military and naval operations, when they were generally successful. West Gulf Squadron, January 1st, 1863 Rear-Admiral David G. Farragut, Commander-in-chief. Steamer Hartford, Flag-ship. Captain, James S. Palmer, commanding; Fleet Captain, Thornton A. Jenkins; Lieutenant-Coinmander, Lewis A. Kimberly; Lieutenants, J. C. Watson and H. B. Tyson; Fleet Surgeon, J. M. Foltz; Surgeon, W. M. King; Assistant Surgeon, Joseph Hugg; Paymaster, W. T. Meredith; Chief Engineer, J. B. Kimball; Marine Officers: Captain, J. L. Broome; 1st Lieutenant, J. H. Higbee; Ensigns, J. H. Read, J. J. Read,D. D. Wemple and C. D. Jones; Midshipman, H. J. Blake; Assistant Engineers, E. B. Latch, F. A. Wilson, Isaac de Graaf, C. M. Burchard, A. K. Fulton, H. H. Pilking
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
death of Commander Abner Reed of the Monongahela. He was mortally wounded by a rifle-shell while passing the batteries, twelve miles below Donaldsonville, and Farragut says of him: Commander Reed was one of the most enterprising and gallant officers in my squadron, and the very mention of his name was a source of terror to the Confederates--the country could well have spared a better man. No higher eulogium was ever passed upon any officer, and it should be recorded in history. Captain T. A. Jenkins, who was on board, was severely wounded. This brings the narrative of events up to July 28th, 1863. The news of the surrender of Vicksburg had been received in New Orleans, and that of Port Hudson immediately followed. The Father of Waters flowed peacefully to the sea, free and untrammelled. The great chain of slavery was broken, never to be again united. The work of setting free the great artery of the North and South, so essential to our nationality, had been accomplishe
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
stant Surgeon, Edward Kershner; Lieutenant of Marines, Charles Haywood; Acting-Master's Mates, Henry Wyman, E. V. Tyson, Chas. O'Neil and J. M. Harrington; Boatswain, E. B. Bell; Gunner, Eugene Mack; Carpenter, W. M. Leighton; Sailmaker, David Bruce. Steamer John L. Lockwood. Acting-Masters, G. W. Graves and W. F. North; Acting-Assistant Engineers, J. T. Newton, W. W. Whiting and J. T. Miller; Acting-Master's Mate, Samuel Horton. Steamer Wachusett. Commander, Wm. Smith and Capt. T. A. Jenkins [commanding at different times]; Lieutenant-Commanders, C. A. Babcock and C. E. Fleming; Surgeon, J. H. Otis; Assistant Paymaster, F. K. Moore; Lieutenant Wm. Whitehead; Acting-Masters, Edm. Kimble, S. P. Lathrop and P. Leach; Midshipman, H. C. Tallman; Chief Engineer, W. C. Wheeler; Assistant Engineers, W. D. Pendleton W. H. Messinger, C. J. Coney, H. Holmes and M. H. Knapp; Acting-Master's Mates, A. Ellwell, Wm. McCreary and C. A. Stewart; Boatswain, John Burrows; Gunner, Samuel Cro
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
th the Metacomet, Lieutenant-Commander James E. Jouett. Richmond, Captain Thornton A. Jenkins, with the Port Royal, Lieutenant-Commander Bancroft Gherardi. Lachere is one other officer of my squadron of whom I feel bound to speak, Captain T. A. Jenkins, of the Richmond, who was formerly my chief-of-staff, not because of hi Garrison, coal-heaver; Thomas O'Connell--. Captain (now Rear-Admiral) Thornton A. Jenkins. Report of Captain Thornton A. Jenkins, commanding U. S. S. RichmondCaptain Thornton A. Jenkins, commanding U. S. S. Richmond: Sir — I have the honor and very great pleasure to report, that in the action this forenoon with the batteries at Fort Morgan and the rebel rain Tennessee, thisoantree is particularly deserving of notice. Additional Reports of Captain T. A. Jenkins, commanding U. S. S. Richmond: Sir — I have the honor to report tatswain, Andrew Milne; Gunner, J. Q. Adams. *steamer Richmond. Captain, Thornton A. Jenkins; Lieutenant-Commander, Edward Terry; Surgeon, L. J. Williams; Assist
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