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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 68 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 20 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 2 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 24 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 21 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 10 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 20 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Jenkins or search for Jenkins in all documents.

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While the rebel General Jenkins was in Hagerstown, Md., a lieutenant and five men, wearing the uniform of Union soldiers, crept out of some of the houses of the town where they had been hidden, and delivered themselves up. When they made their appearance before General Jenkins, the following conversation occurred: Jenkins. HalGeneral Jenkins, the following conversation occurred: Jenkins. Halloo! who are you, and where did you come from? Lieutenant. We belong to the Union army, or did belong to it, but we don't wish to fight any longer against our Southern brethren; so when our forces left here we staid behind, and to-day we came out to be paroled. Jenkins. What did you say about Southern brethren ? If I thought erable to be paroled in military style. So saying, he ordered a detail of six men and a sergeant--good lusty fellows, with thick boots --who paroled the recreant Federals to the west border of the town, where the paroling process ceased, and the detail and crowd returned highly pleased with Jenkins's mode of paroling cowards.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), Border war, as seen and experienced by the inhabitants of Chambersburgh, Pa. (search)
But we heeded it not until it was clear That Jenkins had come unpleasantly near, And Lee himself wne, And night put her sable garments on, Came Jenkins, the guerrilla chief, And arrant traitor, ands rebs were dirty as dirt could make 'em, And Jenkins himself may have been a sachem, A man or goril deny he was wretchedly dirty and hairy. Now Jenkins put up at the best hotel, And as every thing ir battles “mit Sigel.” “Dear Harmon,” says Jenkins, “I'm glad to be here, And to know you's a grsed, no doubt, with this honest feeling, (For Jenkins was morally hostile to stealing,) He ordered d at the bills and bought out the town. Still Jenkins had terrible griefs to bear, And as Jenkinsesofane, You all shall be paid — to-morrow. Now Jenkins determined to leave us awhile, But first thouy them by firing (And oh! how we trembled at Jenkins's frown) Upon the benignant confederate forceor howitzer, cannon, and caisson. VII. But Jenkins now returns again, And Lee and his army