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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 68 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 20 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 2 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 24 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 21 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 10 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 20 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Jenkins or search for Jenkins in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 2: the battle of Bull Run (July, 1861) (search)
d after the rout of the enemy. Then, on the false alarm about 6.30 P. M., they were ordered to march back to Union Mills, where they arrived late at night, worn out with dust, heat, and fatigue, without having fired a shot all day. Next to Ewell and Holmes came Jones, who had crossed early and waited for Ewell, as has been told. He was also recalled about 11 A. M. About noon he was ordered to cross again and to make some demonstrations. He did so and attempted to charge a battery with Jenkins's S. C. regiment, but became entangled in difficult ground under sharp artillery fire. After losing 14 killed and 62 wounded, and finding his effort isolated and hopeless, he fell back. Next to the left of Jones was Longstreet. He also crossed and recrossed Bull Run in the morning, and crossed again about noon as Jones did. In the afternoon about four he was called back to the south side by orders from Johnston. But he had scarcely completed the movement, when, about half-past 5, there
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 5: Seven Pines or fair Oaks (search)
fight. The three other brigades pushed their attack upon the enemy's second line, which was now being reenforced by Kearny's division, but Hill received also a reenforcement of R. H. Anderson's brigade, which he divided. Two regiments under Jenkins he sent to the left and the remainder under Anderson to his right. A little later also he received two regiments, the 11th Ala. and the 19th Miss., of Wilcox's brigade. With this help the second line was carried. Four Federal regiments and a orces during the battle had averaged about four brigades, for R. H. Anderson had come up, after Rains dropped out with a loss of only 14 per cent. Anderson's losses are not given, but they were severe and probably equalled the average of Hill's. Jenkins's official report says:— We never fought twice in the same place, nor five minutes in one place, and steadily on the advance; were under fire from 3 P. M. to 7.40 P. M. The service we did will be evidenced by our list of killed and wounded.
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 8 (search)
Farm or Glendale, where we left them waiting vainly for the sounds of battle from Huger and Jackson. Between three and four o'clock the enemy, aware of their proximity, unwisely increased the fire of one of their batteries. Longstreet ordered Jenkins, second to none in either courage or ambition, to charge it. Jenkins charged the battery and got possession, but was attacked by the infantry in support. This brought on the battle at once, though not in the best shape; for, instead of one simuJenkins charged the battery and got possession, but was attacked by the infantry in support. This brought on the battle at once, though not in the best shape; for, instead of one simultaneous attack by the whole force, more time was wasted, and the brigades came in in piecemeal. A very desperate fight ensued, and lasted until long after dark, with varying fortunes. There were present but the two Confederate divisions, 12 brigades, which had borne the brunt of the 27th at Gaines Mill, and had lost 4300 men out of 22,000 engaged. They were taking the aggressive against Kearny's, McCall's, and Hooker's divisions (about 25,000 men), carefully posted, with some protection and
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
Northern Virginia, Sept., 1862 CORPSDIVISIONSBRIGADESBRIGADES 1st Corps Longstreet'sMcLawsKershaw, Semmes, Cobb, Barksdale5 Anderson, R. H.Wilcox, Armistead, Mahone, Pryor, Featherstone, Wright4 Jones, D. R.Toombs, Drayton, Garnett, Kemper, Jenkins, Anderson, G. T.4 Walker, J. G.Walker, J. G. Ransom2 EvansEvans, Hood, Law3 Reserve ArtilleryWashington Artillery, Lee's Battalion10 Total 1st Corps5 Divisions21 Brigades, 28 Batteries, 112 Guns28 2d Corps Jackson'sEwellLawton, Trimble, Eary holding key points to farther advance. Had our forces never been separated, the battle of Sharpsburg never would have been fought. On the arrival of the head of Longstreet's column, Evans was sent to the left to support Rodes, and Kemper, Jenkins, and Picketts were sent to the right at the foot of the mountain, by a rough road, to meet a force of the enemy said to be crossing the mountain in that direction. After marching a mile and a half, the report having been found to be erroneous,
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 13: Sharpsburg or Antietam (search)
able, the Federal casualties are distributed among the different actions. Confederate casualties. Maryland campaign BRIGADESKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL McLaws's Div Kershaw1074556568 Semmes5627443373 Cobb76318452846 Barksdale352724311 Total27413195052098 R. H. Anderson's Div. Wilcox3418129244 Armistead529135 Mahone892127227 Pryor4828549382 Featherstone4523836319 Wright3219234258 Total17210172761465 D. R. Jones's Div Toombs1612222160 Drayton82280179541 Garnett3019932261 Jenkins2719612235 Kemper1510227144 Anderson, Geo. T.880694 Total1789792781435 Walker's Div. Manning14068493917 Ransom411414186 Total181825971103 Hood's Div. Wofford6941762548 Law5339025468 Artillery41923 Total126826871039 Evans's Brigade4018565290 S. D. Lee's Art.117586 Washington Art.428234 Agg. Longstreet's Corps986525413107550 BRIGADESKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL 986525413107550 Ewell's Div. Lawton10644721574 Trimble272038238 Early181679194 Hays452892336 Total1961106
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 14: fall of 1862 (search)
Barksdale's, Cobb's, Semmes's, Cabell's Battalion Artillery, 4 Batteries, 18 Guns7,898 Anderson'sWilcox's, Mahone's, Featherstone's, Wright's, Perry's Unorganized Artillery, 4 Batteries, 18 Guns7,639 Pickett'sGarnett's, Kemper's, Armistead's, Jenkins's, Corse's Unorganized Artillery, 3 Batteries, 14 Guns7,567 Total23,104 1ST corps, Longstreet's (Continued) DIVISIONBRIGADES and ARTILLERYPRESENT for duty Hood'sTotal carried forward Law's, Robertson's, Anderson's, Benning's23,104 Unorgat partial cover they could find about the top and slopes of the hill, whence their fire contributed to that from the sunken road. There the six ranks fired successive volleys from each rank, with only a few seconds' intervals. A regiment from Jenkins's brigade was also advanced down the right bank of Hazel Run, reinforcing a company of sharp-shooters which had been doing fine service all day upon the enemy's flanks. Under this increased fire Griffin's charge differed but little in its res
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
, which he hoped would play upon and exaggerate these fears. Two of Pickett's five brigades had been temporarily left,— Jenkins's at Petersburg, and Corse's at Hanover Junction. Lee proposed that when his column of invasion crossed the Potomac, thhile, some demonstrations by the enemy from the York River had excited apprehensions at Richmond, and neither Corse's or Jenkins's brigades were sent forward, as had been planned. A reply was despatched on June 29, saying,— This is the first5,932 3 Corps, 9 Divisions, 37 Brigades, 15 Battns. Arty.62248 Stuart Cavalry10,292 Hampton, Robertson, Jones, F. Lee, Jenkins, W. H. F. Lee Imboden 1 Battn. Arty.624 Totals10,292 1 Division, 7 Brigades624 Aggregate76,22413 Corps, 10 Divisions, In view of the issues at stake, and of the fact that already he had been deprived of two promised brigades (Corse's and Jenkins's), it was unwise even to contemplate sending three brigades of cavalry upon such distant service. When one compares th
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 18: Gettysburg: third day (search)
ckenbrough251 123148 Archer16144517677 Davis180717897 Garnett's Arty.51722 Heth's Div.4111,9055342,850 Perrin100477577 Lane41348389 Thomas16136152 Scales102323110535 Poague's Arty.224632 Pender's Div.2621,3121161,690 McIntosh's Arty.72532 Pegram's Arty.1037148 Reserve Arty.176216,735 3d Corps8374,4071,4916,735 Confederate casualties. Gettysburg. Approximate by brigades COMMANDSKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Hampton17581691 Lee, F.5162950 Lee, W. H. F.2261341 Jones1240658 Jenkins's Arty. Total Cavalry3614064240 Aggregate2,59212,7095,15020,451 Livermore's Estimate3,90318,7355,42528,063 Federal casualties. Gettysburg by divisions COMMANDSKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Wadsworth2991,2296272,155 Robinson916169831,690 Rowley2651,2965412,103 Wainwright's Arty.98611106 1st Corps6663,1312,1626,059 Caldwell1878802081,275 Gibbon3441,2121011,647 Hays238987661,291 Hazard's Arty.271193149 2d Corps7973,1943784,369 Birney2711,3843562,011 Humphreys3141,5622162,092 R
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 19: battle of Chickamauga (search)
for the battle. HoodLaw, Robertson, Benning, Jenkins, Names in italics arrived too late for the were four brigades of Hood's division, under Jenkins, which had been brought around the high toe ory to be attacked. The remaining brigade was Jenkins's own, now under Bratton, and was about 1800 north end, and Geary's three miles behind it. Jenkins had been summoned before sundown to view it aomewhat cloudy, making the moonlight fitful. Jenkins endeavored to restrain his men from firing aselapsed. It was just at this juncture that Jenkins gave orders to withdraw. Law had notified hiight, and the non-pursuit of Law, both he and Jenkins were able to cross the bridge before daylightegate 408. The character of the attack by Jenkins's brigade, and of the defence by Greene's andbrigades of Johnson and Gracie, with those of Jenkins and Benning upon the left, when he received aONBRIGADEKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTALDATE Hood'sJenkins221095136Nov. 4 to Dec. 5 Hood'sBenning156Nov[2 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
llery KershawHenaganWoffordHumphreysBryanAlexander 54 Guns FieldJenkinsAndersonLawGregg Benning 2D corps. Ewell, Early EarlyHaysPegramwed by a general advance of all Longstreet's force, which included Jenkins's large brigade and four others of Anderson's division, which had Longstreet, Smith, Field, Kershaw, and others stood at the head of Jenkins's brigade, in column in the road, ready to be launched in the purs head of the column was about to pass, and it rode into the fire. Jenkins had just before ridden close to Longstreet to offer congratulationred we will put the enemy back across the Rapidan before night. Jenkins and Longstreet were both struck, the former mortally, dying withinapt. Doby, and Bowen, an orderly of Kershaw's staff, were killed. Jenkins's brigade levelled to return the fire, but Kershaw shouted F-r-i-e were so far in the rear, that the attack was given up. As it was, Jenkins's brigade, under Bratton, after a half-hour's attack, drove off Wa