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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 23, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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in counterfeit confederate money, and an old watch, for a horse. At every private house they demanded food, milk, and the latest papers from Richmond. The Colonel (Davies) said he regretted the war; that it was now only a fight for boundaries; that they could not afford to lose the South-west. They numbered between five and six hundred, and were well equipped, but indifferently mounted, save here and there a good horse, which looked very much as if stolen. They were convoyed on this trip by several buck negroes who were mounted, uniformed, and armed. The principal of these seemed to be a negro well known as Dabney, the miller of J. C. Jerrold, at Thornsburgh, in Spottsylvania. Their general behavior was good. They interfered with no private property, save horses, and, as far as we can hear, carried off no negroes. At one place, on their return, they stopped and gave a gentleman a bottle of whisky, made in 1834, which the lucky recipient acknowledged to have been excellent.
ne of the Their love of by their taking off some six or the consent of their own They had along with quantity of counterfeit Confederate money city of Richmond and other notes They gave a man $15 counterfeit Confederate bills for a basket of chickens. In another city, they gave their bond, in counterfeit an old watch, for a horse. At every they demanded food, milk, and the from Richmond. (Davies) said he regretted the now only a fight for boundaries; that not afford to lose the They between five and six hundred, and were but indifferently save a good horse, which looked very . They were on this by several buck negroes, who were mounted and armed. The principal of these negro will known as the J. C. Jerrold, at Thomasburg, in Spotsylvania general behavior was good. They with no private property save horses. as we can bear, carried off no negroes. their return, they stopped and a battle of whiskey, made in the lackey recipient acknowledges to