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The Daily Dispatch: December 2, 1861., [Electronic resource], The second American Revolution, as Viewed by a member of the British parliament. (search)
n, as Viewed by a member of the British parliament. On the 25th October, Capt. Jervis, member of the House of Commons for the borough of Harwich, Essex, England, ucated on the subject of our national difficulties. By special request, Capt. Jervis, R.A., one of the members for the borough of Harwick, delivered a lecture at(Maj. Browness,) presided, and having briefly introduced the subject-- Captain Jervis, M. P., who, on rising, met with a cordial reception, said--Mr. Chairman anneighbors. After reverting to the general features of the American war, Capt. Jervis observed, with reference to the power of the President of the United States required to do so by law, and by the civil authority." In conclusion, Captain Jervis pointed out that the field of emigration which had hith- erto been opapplause. The Mayor then briefly tendered the thanks of the audience to Captain Jervis, and proposed three cheers for him, which, having been heartily given, the
The Daily Dispatch: December 2, 1861., [Electronic resource], The second American Revolution, as Viewed by a member of the British parliament. (search)
Speech of Capt. Jervis, R. A. --We give in another column a speech of Captain Jervis, R. A., delivered on the 25th of October, before a large assembly in Harwich, Essex county, England. A brief paragraph respecting it was re-published in the DCaptain Jervis, R. A., delivered on the 25th of October, before a large assembly in Harwich, Essex county, England. A brief paragraph respecting it was re-published in the Dispatch some time since, but the first full report is that which we now copy from the London Times. This liberal speech is one of many exhibitions of the manner in which the English mind is being educated upon the great Southern question.--Hitherto,f empire; but that, upon personal examination, that opinion had been exactly reversed. Thus such speeches as those of Capt. Jervis will go far to disabuse the public mind of England of anti-Southern prejudices, stimulated, as the English mind now iselfare of England intimately and indissolubly with that of the South. It will be observed that Essex county, to which Capt. Jervis addresses himself, is an agricultural, not a manufacturing county, and that he demonstrates to his audience that not o