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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 4 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jewett, Sarah Orne 1849- (search)
Jewett, Sarah Orne 1849- Author; born in South Berwick, Me., Sept. 3, 1849; was educated at the Berwick Academy. She has travelled extensively in the United States, Canada, and Europe; and is widely known as a short-story writer. Her works include Deephaven; Play days; Old friends and New; A White Heron; A Marsh Island; Betty Leicester; Country by-ways; The mate of the daylight, and friends ashore; A country Doctor; The story of the Normans; The King of folly Island, and other people; Strangers and Wayfarers; A native of Winby, and other tales; The life of Nancy; The country of the pointed firs, etc.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 8: local fiction (search)
o Scotch parishes are alike, at least if one is painted by Barrie and the other by Ian Maclaren; nor any three New England hamlets if painted respectively by Sarah Orne Jewett, Mary Wilkins, and Alice Brown. Miss Jewett will find in hers an element of higher breeding and more refined living. Her people will be more influenced by Miss Jewett will find in hers an element of higher breeding and more refined living. Her people will be more influenced by sentiment, perhaps sometimes too much so. Miss Wilkins's people will be wonders of keen delineation, but their life will be grim-sometimes too grim. Undoubtedly the whole life of New England seems to all English readers much more stern and sombre than it is, because of her delineations; just as all Americans form a highly exaggeraaking doll in starched petticoats. Few, indeed, of our authors can venture to portray, what would seem not so impossible, an every-day gentleman or lady. But Miss Jewett can produce types of the old New England gentry, dwelling perhaps in the quietest of country towns, yet incapable of any act which is not dignified or gracious;
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 9: the Western influence (search)
h more artificial society. It is as inevitable as the yearning of every clever amateur comedian to act Hamlet. Bret Harte and many of his successors handle admirably the types they knew in early life, but the moment they attempt to delineate a highly-bred woman the curtain rises on a creaking doll in starched petticoats. Few, indeed, of our early Western authors could venture to portray, what would seem not so impossible, an everyday gentleman or lady. For the East, on the other hand, Miss Jewett has been able to produce types of the old New England gentry, dwelling perhaps in the quietest of country towns, yet incapable of any act which is not dignified or gracious; and Miss Viola Roseboro has depicted such figures as that of the old Southern lady, living in a cheap New York boarding-house, toiling her life away to pay her brother's or her father's debts, and yet so exquisite in all her ways that the very page which describes her seems to exhale a delicate odor as of faded jasmin
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
Ingraham, Joseph Holt, 129. Innocents abroad, Mark Twain's, 248. Irving, Washington, 83-92, 94, 119, 140, 142, 161, 240. I sing the body Electric, Whitman's, 230. I slept and dreamed that life was beauty, Mrs. Hooper's, 264. Israfel, Poe's, 212. Jackson, Helen, 126-128, 264. James, Henry, 161, 246, 249-251. James, William, 18. James River Massacre, 9. Jane Talbot, Brown's, 70. Jay, John, 40, 53. Jefferson, Thomas, 46, 48, 80, 82, 221. Jeffrey, Lord, 69, 82. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 253. Joan of Arc, Mark Twain's, 248. Johnson, Dr., Samuel, 57, 67, 216. Johnston, Lady, 53. Jonson, Ben, 174. Josh Billings, 242, 243. Keats, John, 225, 279. Kenton, Simon, 237. Kerr, Orpheus C., 243. King, Clarence, 278. Kirkland, Mrs. Caroline M., 240. Knickerbocker literature, 106. Knickerbocker magazine, 106, 132. Knickerbocker's history of New York, Irving's, 85. Knickerbocker School, 83, 104. Kubla Khan, Coleridge's, 212. Laco Letters, 48. Lady
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
d obscure sound, as hev for have, hendy for handy, ez for as, thet for that, and again giving it the broad sound it has in father, as hansome for handsome. 5. To the sound ou he prefixes an e (hard to exemplify otherwise than orally). . . . 6. Au in such words as daughter and slaughter, he pronounces ah. 7. To the dish thus seasoned add a drawl ad libitum. The New England dialect may perhaps best be studied in such later writers as Rose Terry Cooke, See Book III, Chap. VI. Sarah Orne Jewett, Ibid. and Mary E. Wilkins Freeman. Ibid. What is known as the Southern dialect may be formulated also in seven general rules: 1. Like does duty for as if in such sentences as He looks like he was sick. This construction, says Lowell, is never found in New England. 2. 'Low (allow), meaning think and say, though never heard in New England (Lowell), is very common among white and black illiterates, as it is in the pages of Bret Harte. Guess in the New England sense is also u
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
rials of life itself. One cannot forget them. A transition from another source is to be found in the stories of Sarah Orne Jewett (1849-1909), who also stands on the border line between the real and the romantic. She was affected not at all by real that it may be reckoned with as one of the characters in the story. Rose Terry Cooke had written of New England; Miss Jewett wrote of Deephaven, which was Berwick, Maine, her native town. Mrs. Stowe and Mrs. Cooke wrote of the New England flood tide; Miss Jewett wrote of the ebb, not despairingly like Miss Wilkins and the depressed realists, but reverently and gently. Over all her work is the hint of a glory departed, that Irving-like atmosphere which is the soul of romance. She deligree phases: first, the Irvingesque school that romanticized its material and threw over it a softened light,—Harte, Miss Jewett, Cable, Page; second, the exhibitors of strange material objectively presented,—Charles Egbert Craddock, Octave Thanet, a
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: books for children (search)
Some of these were written for St. Nicholas, in which Mrs. Mary Mapes Dodge was nearly equalling her achievement. The two books which next to Miss Alcott's have the most assured position are Mrs. Dodge's Hans Brinker (1865) and Donald and Dorothy (1883). The former still remains the best story about Holland, and was awarded a prize by the French Academy; the latter runs it close for naturalness and interest. A little later these artistic successes were matched by Betty Leicester of Sarah Orne Jewett, See also Book III, Chap. VI. whose work for young people has the charm and distinction of her short stories for adults. St. Nicholas became in itself a library of choice literature for children, and many of the books which this chapter mentions appeared there. It encouraged writers for younger children also, and there were now some magazines devoted to them alone. For them Rebecca Clarke (1833-1906) had already written much, under the name of Sophie May. The Little Prudy and Do
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
0, 150, 151, 183, 291 Jackson, Helen Hunt, 383 Jackson, Henry Rootes, 290, 299 Jackson, Dr., James, 226 Jackson, T. J. (Stonewall), 283, 290, 299, 300, 302, 307 Jacobs, Joseph, 357 n. James, Henry, 18, 293, 374-376, 377, 380, 381, 384, 386, 387 James, William, 213, 375 Janvier, Thomas A., 388 Japikse, N., 146 Jay, John, 180 Jeanette, 381 Jefferson, 84, 93 n., 105, 111, 180, 183, 201 Jeffersonian, 191 Jerrold, Douglas, 148 Jespersen, Professor, 365 Jewett, Sarah Orne, 382-383, 364, 390, 402 Jolly old pedagogue, 242 John Brown's body, 279, 285 John Burns of Gettysburg, 284 John Endicott, 39 John of Barneveld, 145, 146 John Phoenix. See Derby, G. H. Johns Hopkins University, 338 Johnson, Andrew, 143, 144, 151, 157 Johnson, Judge S. E., 264 Johnson, Dr., Samuel, 38, 94, 124, 203, 234, 239, 367 Johnston, Albert Sidney, 306 Joseph E., 306 Joseph E., Richard Malcolm, 316, 318, 320, 347, 365, 379, 389 Jonas books, 400
, 39 Huckleberry Finn, Clemens 238 Humorists, American, 239 Hutchinson, Anne, 32 Hutchinson, Thomas, 12 Hiyperion, Longfellow 152 Indian Wars, Hubbard 89 Indians, in literature, 37-40; Thoreau's notes on, 136 Innocents abroad, Clemens 237, 239 Irving, Washington, 89, 90-95 Israfel, Poe 189, 192 Jackson, Andrew, 5 Jackson, Helen Hunt, 248 James, Henry, 250, 251-55 Jay, John,65 Jefferson, Thomas, 79-85, 265 Jesuits in North America, the, Parkman 185 Jewett, Sarah Orne, 249, 250 John of Barneveld, life and death of, Motley 181 Johnson, Edward, Captain, 38 Joshua Whitcomb, Thompson 248 Journal, Emerson 122, 125, 127, 235 Journal, Thoreau 134, 135 Journal, Woolman 69 Journal and correspondence, Longfellow 216 Journalism, in the colonies, 60-62; in 20th century, 263-64 Kemble, Fanny, 245-46 Kennedy, J. P., 245 King, Grace, 247 King, Starr, 262 King Philip's War, 39-40 King's College (Columbia), 62 Knickerbocker gr
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
on, 12 October, 1918. The short story may specially claim Bret Harte, Aldrich, Stockton, Bunner, Rose Terry Cooke, Sarah Orne Jewett, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, Cable, Constance Fenimore Woolson, Charles Egbert Craddock, Johnston, Page, For these the New England life she knows so well—an atmosphere which relates her to the school of fiction ably represented by Sarah Orne Jewett, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, and Mrs. Margaret Deland. See Book III, Chap. VI. But Children of earth failed becausonal prospectus it began auspiciously. Among the earliest contributors were William James, Robert Louis Stevenson, Sarah Orne Jewett, Thomas Nelson Page, Elizabeth Akers, H. C. Bunner, Andrew Lang, Austin Dobson, Charles Edwin Markham, Edith Thomasinence; but the favourite publishers of Southern writers for a generation before the war were the Harpers, the Appletons, Jewett & Company, Derby & Jackson, and the Lippincotts. But if the South was not active in publication, the evidence is overwhe
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