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Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, April, 1863. (search)
n, who was commanding officer of the troops here. He told me a great deal about the Texan history, the Jesuit missions, and the Louisiana purchase, &c.; and he alarmed me by doubting whether I should be able to cross the Mississippi if Banks had taken Alexandria. I also made the acquaintance of Major Minter, another Virginian, who told me he had served in the 2d cavalry in the old United States army. The following officers in the Confederate army were in the same regiment-viz., General A. S. Johnson (killed at Shiloh), General Lee, General Van Dorn, General Hardee, General Kirby Smith, and General Hood. Also the Federal Generals Thomas and Stoneman. By the advice of McCarthy, I sent my portmanteau and some of my heavy things to be sold by auction, as I could not possibly carry them with me. I took my place by the stage for Alleyton (Houston): it cost $40; in old times it was $13. I dined with McCarthy and young Duff at 3 P. M. The latter would not hear of my payin
the captain and crew of which were taken off, and the vessel burnt to the water's edge. The Nashville then ran into Southampton, England, landed the prisoners, and remained there.--(Doc. 182.) Isham G. Harris, Governor of Tennessee, called out the militia of the Second, Third, and Fourth Divisions of that State to be ready to march by the 25th, unless, in the mean time, a sufficient number of volunteers shall have tendered their services to fill the requisition made upon him by General A. S. Johnson of the Confederate States Army.--(Doc. 177.) Warsaw, the capital of Benton County, Missouri, was burned. The flames broke out at six P. M., and all the business portion of the town was laid in ashes. G. Wallace Ewer, son of Captain John Ewer, of New Bedford, Massachusetts, was promoted from a Master's Mate to Acting Master, for gallant conduct at the Port Royal fight. He served on board the Mohican. His father was in the same action on board the Sabine. Major-Genera
ed herewith is a list of our men in the hands of the enemy, given me by Capt. Blake, which he thought to be nearly complete. The number reported buried by them on the field yesterday was sixty-eight. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. D. Webster, Major and Chief Engineer. To Brig.-Gen. U. S. Grant, Com. Div. Secession reports. General Polk's despatch. Headquarters, First Div. West, Department, Columbus, Ky., Nov. 7, 1861. To General Headquarters, through General A. S. Johnson: The enemy came down on the opposite side of the river, Belmont, to-day, about seven thousand five hundred strong, landed under cover of gunboats, and attacked Col. Tappan's camp. I sent over three regiments under Gen. Pillow to his relief, then at intervals three others, then Gen. Cheatham. I then took over two others in person, to support a flank movement which I had directed. It was a hard-fought battle, lasting from half-past 10 A. M. to five P. M. They took Beltzhoover's
Secession reports. General Polk's despatch. Headquarters, First Div. West, Department, Columbus, Ky., Nov. 7, 1861. To General Headquarters, through General A. S. Johnson: The enemy came down on the opposite side of the river, Belmont, to-day, about seven thousand five hundred strong, landed under cover of gunboats, and attacked Col. Tappan's camp. I sent over three regiments under Gen. Pillow to his relief, then at intervals three others, then Gen. Cheatham. I then took over two others in person, to support a flank movement which I had directed. It was a hard-fought battle, lasting from half-past 10 A. M. to five P. M. They took Beltzhoover's battery, four pieces of which were re-captured. The enemy were thoroughly routed. We pursued them to their boats seven miles, then drove their boats before us. The road was strewn with their dead and wounded, guns, ammunition, and equipments. Our loss considerable; theirs heavy. L. Polk, Major-General Commanding. Reply
West-Pointers in the two armies.--From a list before us of the West-Point graduates, who are officers in the armies of the United States and confederate States, it appears that there are in the United States army seventeen major-generals and twenty-four brigadier-generals; in the confederate States army, five generals (beside A. S. Johnson, killed at Shiloh,) eighteen major-generals, forty-one brigadier-generals. From this list, which ends with 1848, it appears that we have sixty-four generals from West-Point in our army, while the United States have but forty-one. It was no idle or unmeaning boast of President Davis that he had pick and choice of the officers of the old army. Notwithstanding the frequent flings at West-Pointers, we may yet find it a cause of congratulation that we had at the head of our government one who was educated at West-Point himself, but who, by his service in the army and in the War Department, was so thoroughly acquainted with the military talent of a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bragg, Braxton, -1876 (search)
for good conduct in the latter several brevets and promotions. The last brevet was that of lieutenant-colonel, for Buena Vista. Feb. 23, 1847. He was made major in 1855; resigned the next year, and lived (an extensive planter) in Louisiana until the breaking out of the Civil War, when (March, 1861) he was made a brigadier-general in the Confederate army. Made major-general in February, 1862, he took an important part in the battle of Shiloh in April. He was made general in place of A. S. Johnson, killed; and in May succeeded Beauregard in command. John H. Morgan, the guerilla chief, and N. B. Forrest, the leader of a strong cavalry force, had for some time (in 1862) roamed, with very little serious opposition, over Kentucky and Tennessee, preparatory to the invasion of the former by a large Confederate force under General Bragg. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, a native of Connecticut, led Bragg's advance. He entered Kentucky from eastern Tennessee, pushed rapidly to Lexington, after de
te. 58. rear Admiral Du Pont. 59 rear Admiral Dahlgren. 60 rear Admiral Goldsborough. 61 Commodore Winslow. 62. Lieutenant-commander Cushing. 63. General R. E. Lee. 64. General Stonewall Jackson. 66. General Ewell. 66. General Beauregard. 67. General Longstreet. 68. General Breckinridge. 69. General A. P. Hill. 70. General Fitzhugh Lee. 71. Colonel Mosby. 72. General Joseph E. Johnston. 73. General Hood. 74. General Bragg. 75. Lieut.-Gen. Kirby Smith. 76. Major-General Price. 77. Major-General A. S. Johnson. 78. Major-General Hardee. 79. Major-General Forrest. 80. Major-General John Morgan. Battle scenes. 81. Battle of Gettysburg. 82. Capture of Lookout mountain. 83. battle of Chapin's farm. 84. Surrender of General Lee. 85. Interview between Generals Sherman and Johnston. 86. The scout. 87. Prisoners' camp at Andersoville, Georgia. 88. the great railroad raid. 89. Obstructing the train. 90. Mrs. Bickerdyke and the Unfaithful surgeon. 91. Mrs. Bickerdyke Uses her dres
eneral McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General Birney. 46. General Mitchell. 47. General Reno. 48. General Grierson 49. General Rousseau. 51. General Wilson. 51. General Kautz. 52. General Stoneman. 63. General Pleasonton. u4. General Gregg. 56. Vice Admiral Farragut. 56. Rear Admiral Porter. 57. rear Admiral Foote. 58. rear Admiral Du Pont. 59 rear Admiral Dahlgren. 60 rear Admiral Goldsborough. 61 Commodore Winslow. 62. Lieutenant-commander Cushing. 63. General R. E. Lee. 64. General Stonewall Jackson. 66. General Ewell. 66. General Beauregard. 67. General Longstreet. 68. General Breckinridge. 69. General A. P. Hill. 70. General Fitzhugh Lee. 71. Colonel Mosby. 72. General Joseph E. Johnston. 73. General Hood. 74. General Bragg. 75. Lieut.-Gen. Kirby Smith. 76. Major-General Price. 77. Major-General A. S. Johnson. 78. Major-General Hardee. 79. Major-General Forrest. 80. Major-General John Morgan.
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Battles of the Western army in which Albama troops were engaged. (search)
urnside and Corn. Goldsborough, 7,500, 24 gunboats; loss 37 k, 214 w, 13 m. Alabama troops, Montgomery True Blues Art. Fort Donelson, Tenn., Feb. 14-16. Gen. Buckner, 17,000; loss 446 k, 1534 w, 13.829 m.—Federal, Gen. Grant and Com. Foote, 20,000, 6 gunboats; loss 500 k, 2108 W, 224 m. Alabama troops, Garvin's Battn.; 26th-50th, 27th Inf. Near Shiloh, Tenn., April 4. Col. Clanton; loss 7 m.—Federal, loss 1 k, 1 m. Alabama troops, 1st Cav. Shiloh, Tenn., April 6, 7. Gens. A. S. Johnson and Beauregard, 38,773; loss 1728 k, 8012 w, 959 m.—Federal, Gens. Grant and Buell, 70,863; loss 1754 k, 8408 w, 2885 m. Alabama troops, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 21st, 22d, 25th, 26th-50th, 31st, 4th Batt. Inf.; Brewer's, Forrest's, Clanton's, Jenkins', Cav.; 1st, 3d, 53d Cav.; Ketchum's, Gage's, Lumsden's Battrs. New Madrid or Island No.10, Tenn., March 16 to April 8. Gen. McCown, 15 regts.; loss 17 k, 13 w, 2000 m.—Federal, Gen. Pope and Corn. Foote, 33 regiments, 17 boats
Terrible Steam boiler explosion. --A terrible accident occurred at New Haven, Ct., Friday. The boiler of the factory of Dan & Brothers, makers of the hook works of carriages, exploded, tearing away a portion of the building and badly injuring several persons, One, a boy, named John Kane, will die from a fracture of the skull. Two others, G. G. Baldwin and George Dewolf, were badly scalded. Another boy named Johnson was badly injured. Another boy named Rice is supposed to be buried under the ruins. The cause of the explosion is unknown. The canal and railroad track are covered with the ruins. A dispatch from New Haven, Saturday, says: The boy Henry Rice, who was killed by the steam boiler explosion at Dan & Brothers' coach factory yesterday, was found under the ruins last night; nearly all his bones were crushed. The boy John Kane lives, but with no hope of his life; G. G. Baldwin and Geo. DeWolf are very low; Jos. Van Riper was badly scalded, but may live. The
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