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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
attle being distinctly heard, he changed the direction of his march toward the firing. Arriving at the Robinson house, he took position in defense of a battery and attacked the enemy in his front. Advancing to the turnpike under fire, Lieut.-Col. B. J. Johnson, of the legion, fell, as, with the utmost coolness and gallantry, he was placing our men in position, says his commander. Soon enveloped by the enemy in this direction, the legion fell back with the commands of Bee and Evans to the fir, leading in the final and triumphant charge of the Confederates, was a South Carolinian. Col. C. H. Stevens, a volunteer on his staff, his near kinsman, and the distinguished author of the iron battery at Sumter, was severely wounded. Lieut.-Col. B. J. Johnson, who fell in the first position taken by the Hampton legion, was a distinguished and patriotic son of the State, and Lieut. O. R. Horton, of the Fourth, who was killed in front of his company, had been prominent in the battle of the ear
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
ould be interesting to the South Carolina public, I write this communication. Beaufort Volunteer Artillery (Stuart's Battery). Our historian, the late William Gilmore Sims, is authority for the statement that this command was founded in 1776, and served during the war for independence; it was on duty at the siege of Charleston, and of course, was included in the surrender of May, 1780. The commanders from 1776-1865 have been Captains Burke, Henry, Grayson Zealy, George P. Elliott, B. J. Johnson, J. G. Barnwell, Stephen Elliott, Jr., H. M. Stuart. In the early days of this organization its services were presumably for heavy artillery, a similar organization existing in Charleston at the same period, and now maintained only as a social one, The Charleston Ancient Artillery. As far back as present memories go, the company had field pieces, but did not use horses. The light battery gun drill was kept up, and the members were familiar with the light artillery manoeuvres, the me
ct to incorporate the Lynchburg and Tennessee Railroad Company. Mr. Newman, by leave, reported a bill to incorporate the Virginia Mineral Oil and Coal Company, in the county of Mason, and a bill to amend an act entitled an act to incorporate the Mason county Mining and Manufacturing Company, in the county of Mason, passed March 22, 1860. A large number of bills were advanced a stage. Resolutions.--The following resolutions of inquiry were adopted and appropriately referred:--By Mr. Johnson, of prohibiting by law the sale of ardent spirits to free negroes; by Mr. Critcher, of refunding to John F. Hughlett certain expenses incurred by him in the service of the Commonwealth. On motion of Mr. August, the Senate adjourned. House of Delegates. Monday, Feb. 18th, 1861. The House was called to order by Mr. Tomlin, of King William county. Prayer by Rev. George Jacobs, of the Hebrew Church, as follows: Almighty God. Sovereign of the Universe, whose thro
rally, and could be interpreted to mean everything, or nothing, as the case might be. The question next arose as to what the report of the committee meant respecting the Territorial question. It was contended by several, among whom was Reverend Johnson, that it not only applies to our present Territories, but to future acquisitions also, and with that view he (Mr. Johnson) should move an amendment, so as to exclude territory hereafter to be acquired. The debate was kept up to nearly 3ng, as the case might be. The question next arose as to what the report of the committee meant respecting the Territorial question. It was contended by several, among whom was Reverend Johnson, that it not only applies to our present Territories, but to future acquisitions also, and with that view he (Mr. Johnson) should move an amendment, so as to exclude territory hereafter to be acquired. The debate was kept up to nearly 3 o'clock, when they adjourned until Monday at 11 o'clock.
General Assembly of Virginia.[extra session.]Senate. Tuesday,March 12, 1861. The Senate was called to order at 10 o'clock, Mr. Johnson in the chair. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Moore. A communication from the House was rend, announcing the passage of the Senate bill providing for the correction of erroneous assessments, with an amendment, which was concurred in; also, House bill imposing taxes for the support of Government. s On motion, the tax bill was laid on the table and orMr. Carson spoke briefly in support of the measure. The vote was then taken on the indefinite postponement of the bill, with the following result: Yeas.--Messrs. Carter, Coghill, Critcher, Day, J. Dickenson, Douglass, Greever, Hubbard, Johnson, Logan, Lynch, Marshall, Massie, Nash, Neeson, Newlon, Pate, Quesenberry, Rives, Smith, Stuart, Taliaferro, H. W. Thomas, Townes, Urquhart and Wickham--26. Nays.--Messrs. Brannon, Bruce, Caldwell, Carson, Claiborne, A. D. Dickinson, Early,
The Daily Dispatch: March 13, 1861., [Electronic resource], Missouri Convention-report of the Committee on Federal Relations. (search)
continues to exist. It has all the interest of romance about it. It may be put in the same catalogue with Xeno phon's Anabasis, and Napier's history of the Peninsular War. It possesses the inestimable superiority attributed by Horace to seeing over hearing. It abounds in vivid description and animated episodes. Its great fault is the somewhat too turgid character of the style. This, however, was a fault of the age more than of the man.-- He wrote at a time when the declamatory style of Johnson had not ceased to exercise its influence upon English writers, or, we should rather say, his style was formed during that period. Had it been formed at a later day, it might have been simpler, but it would have lost much of its animation, and, consequently, much of its attractiveness. --We are contented to take it as it is, forming, as it does, the most readable book ever yet written by a Virginian, or by any Southern man, so far as we know. It will always be classed with these narratives
The Daily Dispatch: March 13, 1861., [Electronic resource], The intended evacuation of Fort Sumter. (search)
For Hire. --A No. 1 Nurse and House Servant, of good character. Apply to Johnson, Trueheart & Vaughan: Or to B. J. Johnson, cor. of 7th and Clay sts. mh 12--2t For Hire. --A No. 1 Nurse and House Servant, of good character. Apply to Johnson, Trueheart & Vaughan: Or to B. J. Johnson, cor. of 7th and Clay sts. mh 12--2t
--The different companies composing Col. Wade Hampton's South Carolina Legion, have already began their march to Virginia. It is composed of fine materials. The following are the field and staff officers: Colonel, Wade Hampton; Lieut. Colonel, B. J. Johnson; Major, J. B. Griffin: Quartermaster, C. L. Goodwin; Commissary. Thomas Beggs; Surgeon, J. T. Darby; Assistant Surgeon, B. Walter Taylor. The following companies under Lt. Colonel Johnson, arrived in Richmond on Saturday morningLt. Colonel Johnson, arrived in Richmond on Saturday morning via Petersburg Railroad: Washington Light Infantry.--Captain, Jas. Conner; Lieutenants--1st, James Lewndes; 2d, T. M. Logan 3d, Theodore Klinck. Davis Guards.-- Captain, W. L. M. Austin; Lieutenants--1st, G. W. Lester; 2d, J. G. W. Lester; 3d, D. William Yeargon. Gist Rifles--Captain, H. J. Smith; Lieutenants--1st, Robert H. Hudgings; 2d, W. H. Mauldin; 3d, Elijah H. Acker. Washington Artillery--First Lieutenant commanding, James F. Hart; 2d, S. Gilman Horsev 3d, Warren R. Marshall; 4th, Pau
The traitor Andy Johnson. This double-dyed villain reported in Kentucky and Washington that he had been fired upon thirteen times in Tennessee by the Secessionists, in his flight from that State to take shelter under the Lincoln Government. His inference from his escape without injury is probably that he wears a charmed life; but he need not lay the flattering unction to his soul. A man born to be hung cannot be shot. The Knoxville Register corrects his statement by declaring that the shots he supposed to have been fired at him, were only shots fired by the Powell's Valley picnic, on the Pinnacle, in salutation of their flag. Johnson thought they were aimed at him. "A guilty conscience needs no accuser."
The Daily Dispatch: September 13, 1861., [Electronic resource], Major Terrill's official report of skirmishes near Alexandria. (search)
ut four P. M. the same day I attacked, with company B, (Culpeper Minute Men), Lieut. Starke commanding, a company of U. S. infantry, who were routed after heavy firing on both sides, with considerable loss on the part of the Federals. The enemy appeared greatly confused and astonished at the position we had taken, being almost surrounded by their camps. On Tuesday morning my entire command was relieved, and with two additional companies of the 1st Maryland Regiment, commanded by Major B. J. Johnson, the entire force commanded by Col. J. E. B. Stuart, advanced on Munson's hill, which was occupied by Federal troops, the attack on which, as well as on Upton's hill, still further in advance, was a complete success. The field officer of the day on the Federal side and a number of men were killed--six prisoners were taken. East of Upton's hill, near the Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad, whilst patrolling with a detachment of ten men from company I, 1st Maryland Regiment, commanded by
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