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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 69 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 4 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 14 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 7 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 7 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 3, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for George W. Johnson or search for George W. Johnson in all documents.

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While the Fourth corps were thus engaged, Johnson's and Davis' divisions moved up from Catoosa lroad, and threw his line across the valley. Johnson came up on the right and entered the town by At 8 A. M,. the assembly was sounded in General Johnson's division, and it immediately moved forwlt by Wood and Stanley, the enemy opened upon Johnson's division from a mountain howitzer, planted of hills known as the Chattanooga Mountains. Johnson promptly ordered one section of Houghtalling' thing calculated to weary or impede them. Johnson's column filed through Hooker's Gap just afte afternoon, and Colonel Scribner's brigade of Johnson's division, and Morgan's brigade of Davis' direlieved Colonel Williams. A gap between General Johnson and the Fifteenth corps was supplied for of Wood's division, and Scribner's brigade of Johnson's division, which was supporting on the left,o the left, were Generals Hooker, Howard, and Johnson, forming the centre, with General Schofield o
ine of skirmishers drove the enemy from the hill, assisted by the Fifth Indiana battery, Lieutenant Morrison, one section of which was located on a commanding hill about a mile north-west of the town. While the Fourth corps were thus engaged, Johnson's and Davis' divisions moved up from Catoosa Platform, on the centre, and entered Tunnel Hill. Davis' division moved along the main wagon road running parallel with the railroad, and threw his line across the valley. Johnson came up on the rigJohnson came up on the right and entered the town by a narrow trail running down from the direction of Nickojack's Gap. Barnett's Illinois battery, attached to Davis' division, opened their guns upon the enemy's position about nine, and a brisk cannonading was kept up for two hours until the enemy was flanked and took flight. The fire of the enemy's artillery was quite accurate, and the cavalry displayed remarkable abandon and contempt for our fire, oily retiring when compelled to by overwhelming numbers. On compar
Sunday, May 8. At 8 A. M,. the assembly was sounded in General Johnson's division, and it immediately moved forward and formed line of battle about a mile in advance of its former position. Immediately after General Howard, who, in the absence of General Thomas, had command of the Fourteenth and Twenty--third corps, in addition to his own corps, ordered forward General Stanley's division on the centre to make a demonstration to develop the enemy's strength and position. Simultaneously with this order General Newton was instructed to endeavor to throw a regiment or two up Rocky Face, and to move along it cautiously. General Harker was instructed by Newton to execute the order, and promptly selected the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Ohio, Colonel Opdycke, to perform the task. The response of Colonel Opdycke and his Ohio tigers was prompt, fearless, and steady. The veteran regiment climbed the steep ride, ever and anon stopping to, cross some rocky gorge, or scale almost perpendic
and steep gorges rendered an assault and capture of the ridge impossible. In the operations of the day Wood lost about seventy wounded and six killed. At eleven o'clock, and previous to the assault by Wood and Stanley, the enemy opened upon Johnson's division from a mountain howitzer, planted on the summit of a commanding hill, which forms a link in the chain of hills known as the Chattanooga Mountains. Johnson promptly ordered one section of Houghtalling's Illinois battery into position,Johnson promptly ordered one section of Houghtalling's Illinois battery into position, and shelled the rebel battery, the third shot taking effect in the howitzer, and silencing it until in the afternoon, when Wood and Stanley made their demonstration, and called out a vigorous artillery and musketry fire along the whole line. At four o'clock, General Howard ordered the divisions of Stanley and Wood forward into the gaps facing the enemy's breastworks and fortifications to the right of Dalton. The movement had the desired effect, compelling the enemy to open his artillery, a
e fought forward as my report shows (that I sent yesterday) for three miles, the particulars of which I am unable to give you more fully now. Suffice it to say now, that the Thirty-sixth began the fight. and my tent is now reared (to-day) on the advance post where the last dead rebel fell. General Nelson thinks we buried the great Sidney Johnson, their commander, within two rods of where I am now writing. He lies silently seeking his rights in the territories. The provisional rebel, Governor Johnson, of Kentucky, is also in our hands, wounded, God bless him. I hope he will die without delay. Our loss is heavier than I wrote you yesterday; it is now estimated at one thousand five hundred killed, two thousand taken prisoners on Sunday, and four thousand wounded; total seven thousand five hundred. That of the enemy is much larger, particularly in killed. I will write you some of the particulars more definitely, of the latter part of the battle, in my next, if there is no move to
s' corps hospital. Sayers was one of the Camp Jackson prisoners, and formerly a citizen of St. Louis, Missouri. I presume many of the prisoners taken on Sunday escaped. About four o'clock a deserter came in and informed us that Breckenridge's division of the rebel army was advancing towards the same point where we had been in such deadly strife during the fore part of the day, which statement was soon verified by the roar of artillery and small arms in that direction, again moving upon Johnson and Baird's shattered divisions ; about the same time a heavy force of the enemy commenced an attack to our right and rear, from towards Lee and Gordon's Mills, and from the direction we had come in the morning, and opened the most terrific cannonading I had heard during these battles, and in a few moments completely enfilading our entire rear. At fifteen minutes before five o'clock, Lieutenant Thomas, Major-General Palmer's Aid, brought me an order to retire my command. Which way or wher
the Major-General commanding, to proceed as rapidly as possible with my command and report to him at Nashville, arriving at that place at five o'clock P. M. on the first day of December. By an accident to one of the trains the command of Colonel Johnson, of the Forty-fourth United States colored troops, was detained until the morning of the second December, when the train conveying his troops was attacked by the cavalry of the enemy, five miles south of Nashville. I herewith submit ColoColonel Johnson's report of his encounter with the enemy. On the second day of December I moved my command, by order of the Major-General commanding, into position, and occupied and fortified the ridge between the Murfreesboro and Nolensville pikes, and crossing the Nashville and Chattanooga railroad on Raine's farm. December 3. By order of Major-General Thomas I withdrew my command from the position occupied the day previous, and placed it on a line indicated, nearer the city of Nashville,
of young Frank Gray in bringing away the friction primers would have prevented the enemy from using them against us. Too much credit cannot be awarded to Sergeant Johnson, of the Second Maryland; Captain San. Goins, of this place; Mr. Albert Bayliss, of Shelby; and Mr. J. B. Gibson, of Cincinnati, the latter an old Kentucky Mted the fort, and found the ordnance and stores in good condition, but no regular artillery force to man the guns. I then directed Colonel Keenon to furnish Sergeant Johnson, of the Second Maryland infantry, with a force from his command to work the cannon, which being done, I commenced, in order to strengthen the position, the cery loyal citizen. Never did veteran soldiers conduct themselves more nobly than did the little band that defended the capital. To Captain Sanford Goins, Sergeant Johnson, Mr. Bayliss, of West Point, Mr. J. B. Gibson, of Cincinnati, and Captain Henry Brown, I am under especial obligations for efficient services in manning the
The men, however, resort to various ingenious devices to get over to us. In my last I stated the circumstance of almost two hundred coming in on Friday night to Johnson's (Fourteenth) corps and Logan's. I have since learned that they were the remnants of the Forty-sixth and--Georgia regiments, who during a truce had arranged, thrgainst our right centre, composed of General Newton's division of General Howard's corps, on the main Buckhead road; of General Hooker's corps next south, and General Johnson's division of General Palmer's corps. The blow was sudden and somewhat unexpected, but General Newton had hastily covered his front by a line of rail piles wed, and had to fight on comparatively open ground, and it, too, after a very severe battle, drove the enemy back to his intrenchments. The action in front of General Johnson was comparatively light, that division being well intrenched. The enemy left on the field over five hundred dead, about one thousand wounded severely, seven
long the railroad between there and Chattanooga, and quietly make preparations to defend his post. On the thirteenth, one corps of Hood's army appeared in front of Dalton, and a summons to surrender, signed by Hood in person, was sent in to Colonel Johnson, Forty-fourth United States colored troops, commanding the garrison. Colonel Johnson being convinced of the uselessness of contending against so overwhelming a force of the enemy, and knowing there was no succor at hand, complied with the dColonel Johnson being convinced of the uselessness of contending against so overwhelming a force of the enemy, and knowing there was no succor at hand, complied with the demand. On the fourteenth,Morgan's division reached Chattanooga, and General Steedman's command arrived at Bridgeport, where he received orders to proceed to Chattanooga. After remaining at Dalton one day, during which he destroyed about five miles of railroad, the enemy moved off to the westward, through Nickajack Gap, to rejoin the remainder of Hood's army near Summerville, to which point he had been followed by General Sherman with the Fourth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Seventeenth corps
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